Career Articles for Nurse


  So . 

 You made it! You sat for the exams a while ago, waited a few days for your results and now you’ve passed. 

   

 But slow down! Your career as a nurse still has a long way to go. This is only one of the first steps. 

  Here’s what to do after you’ve passed your nursing board exams:  

 1. Celebrate! 

 Yes! Go out and celebrate. You studied very hard for it. You’ve sacrificed a lot. Your family supported you through it. You’ve spent an enormous amount of time and energy in order to become a registered nurse. 

 So yes, celebrate. Be grateful you’ve made it this far. Allow yourself a moment to feel proud of yourself. It isn’t a small achievement, no matter what people say. 

 2. Claim your license 

 Passing the exam does not automatically grant you your license. There’s a couple of things you have to get sorted first. 

 
	 Get the form from the  Malaysian Nursing Board website.  
	 Prepare some passport-sized photos, copies of your birth certificate, NRIC, SPM transcript and an official photo of you in your nurse uniform. 
	 Fill in the form. Use black ink! The administration might scan your documents, so using any other color might not turn up well. 
	 Carry with you RM25 when you’re going to go submit it. 
	 Keep a copy with you, stored in a safe file. 
 

 3. Search for a job! 

 Once you’ve got your registration, it’s time to search for work so you can collect experience immediately. 

 You can apply through healthcare institutions directly; many of them do walk-in interviews. Alternatively, you can opt to apply for a nursing job through the Public Services Dept (SPA -  Suruhanjaya Perkhidmatan Awam ). 

 If you want to be  really  fancy about it, use  MIMS Career . Browse through the hundreds of nursing jobs we have in our database, uploaded by high-paying healthcare employers. Filter by location, experience, and time to help you find what you want. 

     

 Can’t find what you’re looking for? Sign up for our  headhunting service . Just submit your CV/resume, and we’ll match you with jobs that meet your criteria, for  free . If you’re unsatisfied with who we match you with, no problem; we’ll match and match you again, until you land the job you want. 

  Use MIMS Career  

  Sign up for our headhunting service to get automatically matched to jobs

Passed Your Malaysian Nursing Board (LJM) Exam? Here's What To Do Next!

So . You made it! You sat for the exams a while ago, waited a few days for your results and now you’ve passed. But slow down! Your career as a nurse still has a long way to go. This is only one of the first steps. Here’s what to do after you’ve passed your nursing board exams:...

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 Let’s get down on the breakdown of how to avoid your meltdowns because of commuting downtown. 

 That rhyme scheme though. Okay, let’s get to it: here are five ways to make your terrible commute a little bit more bearable: 

 1. Consume great content: Learn something! 

   

 Podcasts 

 Podcasts are an amazing way to pass the time during long commutes. Fill up your wasted time in traffic or on public transport by listening to high-quality conversations that teach you something. 

 For those unfamiliar with the term, a podcast is sort of like a radio show; it’s a conversation between two or more people, or it’s a talk by someone with ideas or topics worth sharing. Think of it as on-demand radio talk shows, digitized into a digestible format. 

 The best method of listening to podcasts on the go is using your phone. on iOS, the Podcasts app does a pretty good job; you can browse and subscribe to shows then listen to them within the app. For extra features,  Overcast  does an amazing job; it has smart speed features that eliminate pauses in conversations. It also boosts voice audio using smart algorithms to provide you a clear sound over the hustle and bustle of your commute. 

 On Android,  Pocket Casts  is an  excellent  podcast-listening app. 

 Recommended listens: Dan Carlin’s  Hardcore History ,  The Tim Ferriss Show , and  TED Talks: Science and Medicine . 

 Books 

 Statistics show that  42 percent of people after graduation never read another book again . 

  42 percent!  Don’t let that be you. High achievers all finish an average of 10 books per year. Read! And we don’t mean read magazines or newspapers. Read fiction. Non-fiction. Documentaries. Biographies. 

 Even reading for ten minutes on the train or bus, when done every day, you can finish way more than ten books in a year. 

 Can’t read because you drive? Listen to audiobooks: books that are narrated by professional narrators. We recommend  Audible  for your audiobook needs. 

 Take online courses 

 The best thing about mobile internet is that you can access an entire wealth of knowledge from the world wide web, right in the palm of your hands. 

  Skillshare ,  Udemy , and  Udacity  are all great resources for you to learn anything. 

 Learning never stops!  Read more on why healthcare professionals need to practice lifelong learning HERE.  

 2. Clear your mind 

   

 Meditative exercises 

 Whether or not you work the AM shift or the PM shift, we could all use some peace and quiet before the workday begins. A bit of meditation can go a long way in calming you down, preparing yourself mentally for all the chaos that comes ahead of you. 

  Read about the 5 minute meditation all nurses should know about HERE.  

 Practice mindfulness 

 Mindfulness is the act of being in the moment, the ability to be fully aware of where we are and what we’re doing. Mindfulness allows us to not be overly reactive or overwhelmed by what’s going on around us. 

 Just be still, and focus on your breathing. Notice when your mind wanders. If it does, return your attention to your breaths. 

 Studies have shown that medical practitioners who practice this are happier and better at their jobs. 

 3. Do something productive! 

   

 Triage your emails and tasks 

 Triage is not just for patients! Triage your tasks for the day. For those of you who have a more administrative role in your workplace, sift through your email inbox during your commute. 

 Archive or delete the ones that do not require any action. Draft replies for important emails.  Add some to your task lists.  

 Do this and you will focus more on  doing  things rather than  thinking  about what to do. 

 Journal 

 Write in your journal every day during your commute. List down your worries, your concerns. Also write down what you’re grateful for. Sometimes, just acknowledging that we’re lucky to have a lot of things just makes the day automatically better. 

  The benefits are many.  Successful people throughout the ages have all kept a journal in which they spent so much time on.  Florence Nightingale wrote extensively in her journal , which became the basis of a lot of the texts that she wrote on nursing. 

 You can journal in a small notebook that you keep in your bag on your commute. Alternatively you can decide to go digital: writing your journal in a digital format allows you to save it and retrieve it in the future. 

 4. Talk to someone! 

   

 When was the last time you called your parents? That long-time friend that you drifted away from? 

 You can even strike up a conversation with the person sitting next to you. Try it; don’t be shy. You might even be surprised with the conversations you end up having. 

 5. Change workplace! 

   

 In the end, if your commute is just god-awful, dreadful, soul-sucking, life-sapping… (ok you get the idea) then you should probably request for a change in workplace. 

 Or apply for a job nearer to where you live using MIMS Career, our amazing portal for healthcare professionals like you. Simply filter jobs by location, and browse through hundreds of our listings. Save them for later. Or apply straight away, on your phone of desktop. It just works. 

  The shorter the commute, the happier the workers.  Give it a shot with MIMS Career.

5 Ways To Make Travelling To and From Work More Enjoyable

Let’s get down on the breakdown of how to avoid your meltdowns because of commuting downtown. That rhyme scheme though. Okay, let’s get to it: here are five ways to make your terrible commute a little bit more bearable: 1. Consume great content: Learn something! Podcasts Podcasts are...

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  Aisyah  (not her real name) was frustrated. 

 Last night’s shift made her feel like she never even went to nursing school. 

 She had a patient with ESRD who was about to go for dialysis at 0800. She was monitoring his blood pressure, and at 0445 it was at 166/89. When she came back at 0545, it was 168/98. 

 She started to get nervous. She wanted to call the M.O., but a note left by the nephrologist stated to only notify is systolic is over 200 and diastolic 100. 98 was pretty close to 100, so Aisyah started to panic. 

 It was then that Aisyah realized that the note actually said to call at diastolic > 115. 

 At 0725, the M.O. came over. Although he was nice about it, he told Aisyah that she should’ve called when diastolic was above 90. 

 If Aisyah could kick herself, she would. Even though that happened last night, she is still thinking about the mistake feels bad about it. She feels that she should’ve known better, should’ve talked to her coworkers about it, should’ve made a better decision about the note… 

 
 Does this sound familiar to you? Do you seem to finally be doing well at work, only to make a mistake that bogs you down and makes you miserable, long after it’s happened? Do you feel like you’re a bad doctor/nurse/pharmacist? 

 You have  impostor syndrome . 

 Impostor Syndrome 

 It is the feeling of being a fraud, a fake, and people are going to find out. It’s fine for people who are undercover secret agents or  quacks , but it’s a terrible feeling for people who are trying to make the world a little better. 

 
 “There are an awful lot of people out there who think I’m an expert. How do these people believe all this about me? I’m so much aware of all the things I don’t know.” - Dr. Chan, Chief of the World Health Organization 
 

 You’re actually doing a good job, but you don’t feel that way. Left unchecked, this will harm your mental health and affect your career. 

 Focus on providing value 

  What do people/the ward sister/the HOD think of me? They must think I’m an idiot!  

 We say this to ourselves time and time again. 

 The rule of thumb is that if you’re so concerned about what other people think, you’re not focusing on your work enough. 

  Focus on providing value . Show up, do your best work. Provide value to your patients, colleagues, departments. 

 Stop comparing yourself to others 

  Respect your own experiences.  You went to nursing/med/grad school. You studied extremely hard for this. You sacrificed a ton of your time and energy. You suffered through grueling on-calls and surgeries. 

 You are the sum of your experiences. Please respect all the things you went through to make you who you are. 

  Don’t just be aware of other’s successes.  They have their own shortcomings too, just like you. It’s just that you don’t see them. 

 Being wrong doesn’t mean you’re bad. 

 Being wrong does not mean you’re a bad nurse, bad doctor, bad pharmacist, physician; bad  anything . 

  Everybody makes mistakes.   The designers of the Titanic , supposedly the smartest engineers of their time, designed a now-obvious flaw into the doomed ship. The  Terengganu stadium collapse in 2013  was also a mistake done by contractors, the state government, and inspectors.   Thousands  of mistakes are made in surgery  every year .  

 It’s just how the world works. Don’t let your mistakes and failures define you, and carry on. 

 Nobody really knows what they’re doing 

 Really, no one does. 

  Even multi-million dollar companies run by the smartest people fail a lot.  

 You only feel like you know nothing because you’re more aware of the things you  don’t  know. 

 Final words 

 If you already feel like a failure right now, it probably means you’re doing a good job because of the  Dunning-Kruger effect.  It’s a psychological phenomenon that describes low-ability people’s incompetence to realize their incompetence. 

 In other words,  people who are bad at something don’t know they’re bad at it.  

 The fact that you’ve come to a self-actualization level sufficient to see your own shortcomings means that you’re  learning and growing as a healthcare professional , and as a person. 

 Comfort zone is very nice, but nothing ever grows there. 

 Carry on!

Why You Feel Like You Suck Even Though You're Doing A Great Job

Aisyah (not her real name) was frustrated. Last night’s shift made her feel like she never even went to nursing school. She had a patient with ESRD who was about to go for dialysis at 0800. She was monitoring his blood pressure, and at 0445 it was at 166/89. When she came back at 0545, it...

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 Recently there’s been talk about the Malaysian Nursing Board phasing out the Diploma in Nursing programme. As a result, soon all future nursing students that want to practice the profession in the country has to complete a four-year degree (Bachelor of Science in Nursing). 

 Many parties have been very vocal about this, citing that many nurses cannot afford the extra costs it takes to study for four years instead of the usual two for a diploma. Some students get into nursing for that reason; it offers a quick pathway to work in a respectable profession, without the added burden of a pre-university programme after completion of secondary school. 

 While I understand that some nurses have to support their families ASAP, I’m here to argue that there is a hidden benefit to all nurses being required to do their degree in order to be registered practitioners. 

 That benefit is the extra 2-4 years of age that nurses have upon graduation. 

 Older… Wiser? 

 A few days ago there was news of a 19-year old girl who will become the  youngest medical doctor in Malaysia  this year. The prodigy completed her secondary education at the age of 14, enrolling straight into an Australian pre-U programme, followed by medical school. 

 While I applaud her achievements (it is nothing to make light of), for the rest of us entering the healthcare workforce at 19 is not the best of ideas. 

 A doctor fresh out of medical school at the age of 25 is six years older than 19, and will have six years of extra life experiences that will make him or her relate better to patients. 

 The healthcare line, as we all know, is riddled with a lot of challenges and difficulties that are difficult to teach in training colleges. There are unexpected obstacles from patients, their relatives, and colleagues that are difficult to circumnavigate without emotional maturity. When these are not handled well they lead to burnouts and depression. 

 Forcing the degree programme for nurses rather than diploma grants student nurses extra time to prepare themselves. Most of the time, maturity comes with age. Being a nurse (or a doctor for that matter) is an arduous endeavor in itself. There will be times when you have to react to difficult situations requiring you to make a choice. Maturity grants the wisdom to make the right ones. 

 
 The healthcare line, as we all know, is riddled with a lot of challenges and difficulties that are difficult to teach in training colleges. 
 

 Being sure about oneself 

 As a patient, you would want nurses or doctors who are sure of themselves for your treatment. You want those who believe in what they do and believe in the importance of their work. Not the reluctant ones. 

 It is common for healthcare practitioners to leave the profession within the first 5 years of working. An extra few years of study provides the extra time to contemplate on whether this career path is really for them or not. This creates better rounded nurses and doctors. 

 Better clinicians 

 Better rounded nurses and doctors, who can find the balance between their personal growth and career, make for better clinicians. They are more likely to innovate and push medicine forward. This is why countries like the US and Sweden require prospective medical school students to have a Bachelor’s degree beforehand. These countries have the most number of medical innovations in history. 

 Removal of bad habits 

 
 Better rounded nurses and doctors make for better clinicians. 
 

 For nurses, making BSN degrees mandatory in order to be registered means an addition 4-5 years of study; 1-2 years for a pre-university course (like STPM) and another 4 years for the degree. Contrast this with immediately hopping on the diploma programme for two years after school. 

 The work involved to obtain a degree is very hard. It can only be done by being mentally sound, organized, and effective. These habits are not necessarily attained in school. 

 An older nursing graduate has more time to become a better, organized person; to know her strong points, faults, breaking points, things she cannot do, and learn how to deal with them knowing that a harder road lies ahead.

Making The Case For Longer Studies

Recently there’s been talk about the Malaysian Nursing Board phasing out the Diploma in Nursing programme. As a result, soon all future nursing students that want to practice the profession in the country has to complete a four-year degree (Bachelor of Science in Nursing). Many parties...

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  This week we managed to get in touch with Nejlika (pronounced neh-lika) Confinement Care Centre. They provide confinement services for mothers with newborn babies. Established in 2014, Nejlika is committed to providing the best and safest form of care for the newborns’ first 28 days, and for the mothers’ recoveries.  

  What really got us interested with Nejlika was their practice in bringing confinement, which is a traditional concept in post-natal care, into modern times by using scientific methods of observation and critical analysis.  

  Nejlika is currently hiring for post-natal care nurses.  See the job posting page here for more details .  

 
  Can you describe what your institution provides?  

 Nejlika Confinement Centre provides confinement care for post-natal mothers and newborn babies. 

 We assess the health conditions of the mother and baby, monitoring them daily. We provide professional and scientific feeding, nursing care, and early intellectual development for the baby. For the mother we have uniquely customized meals that are both healthy and delicious. These efforts do a lot to promote healing. 

  How did this place come about?  

 We first saw that there was a market demand for confinement centers in the Klang Valley. We saw that in places like Penang or Johor there are already a substantial amount. But a lot of them are sort of like household business. They hire non-medical professionals for treatment. So we set up this place in 2014. 

 The founders of this centre are all from the healthcare industry. The first 28 days of a newborn will be the most critical stage of a baby’s life. Although confinement is a traditional concept of post-natal care, we bring in present, scientific methods to bring this practice to modern times. 

 New parents or non-professionals are not able to take care of the newborn baby and mother as well as trained nurses and physicians. We aim to provide the best quality service, comfortable living environment, nutritious meals and warm family surroundings to help both the mother and newborn navigate this crucial period of their lives. 

  I saw on your Facebook you have many customers; even non-malaysians. What do you do to attract people to come here?  

 To be honest we don’t really go out to promote the centre. So far it’s all been through word of mouth, maybe a bit of Facebook postings. 

  How do you convince someone who is pregnant to use your services, rather than carry out traditional confinement at home?  

 Usually after the customer knows about us, they will call to inquire. This is before they give birth. So we arrange a 1-to-1 appointment with them. So during this appointment period we explain to them what is the service that we provide, and the philosophy behind our service. 

 Over here, our center advocates breast-feeding, and we have a certified infant massage instructor. We promote early brain development for the baby through the infant massages. 

  What makes you different from the other confinement centres?  

 First of all we are one of the pioneers here, so we are very experienced in specialized confinement care. Also, one of our founders is the only person in Malaysia with twin certificates specialized in confinement care from Taiwan. She purposely went to Taiwan to obtain this certification, not just once but twice. 

 At the same time we engage the service of chinese traditional medicine practitioners. Although we advocate scientific and modern confinement care, we also incorporate the traditional care to bring a well-rounded care to the mother and baby. 

 In Traditional Chinese Medicine, we believe the body constitution of humans can be divided into nine types. Different type of body constitution will require different forms of nutrition or medication. Our chef will prepare the personalized herbal tonic soup for each post-natal mother upon advice by our chinese medicine practitioner for greater rejuvenation.  

 Not many other confinement care provide this service. 

  Can we talk about the food you serve here? They look great! Do you have an in-house cook?  

 We have a special cook. We put out an ad in the newspaper, and managed to get one with training for confinement cooking. We advocate healthy and nourishing foods that aids the mothers’ recovery. 

 Everything that comes into contact with the mothers and babies have to be clean, healthy, and promote recovery. This includes the furniture, beds, food, even the air in the centre as well. 

  How many staff members do you now have?  

 We have 10 nurses, 2 maids, 2 chefs and 1 assistant to help us run the operation. 

 As for now, there are not many customers. It is a bit of a low season. Usually there are more births from late July-early August til the end of the year. 

  To staff: What do you do to make your staff happy and enjoy working here?  

 We feel happy because we enjoy what we do. It’s a slower pace than hospitals, and we love to look after babies. 

  What’s the hiring process like? Who decides on the hire?  

 Advertising on newspaper, platforms online, recommendations of current nurses. More so on the EQ. 

 We advertise in the newspapers, online platforms such as MIMS Career, and word of mouth. Very often we get new hires based on the recommendations of nurses currently working here. 

  What kind of people do you look for when you hire staff?  

 We need staff who are passionate about care for post-natal mothers and infant babies. Post-partum depression is very real, so nurses here have to be very aware of the telltale signs of it. They need to have high EQ to be able to console and advise mothers suffering through post-partum depression and help guide them out of it. 

 We also look out for staff who have high patience levels. Dealing with babies can sometimes prove to be a frustrating task. 

  What cool pieces of technology do you have in this centre?  

 We have a  bilirubinometer ; it is a device that measures the level of bilirubin in the babies to detect jaundice. If jaundice is determined to be present in the baby, we bring in a “jaundice phototherapy” machine and treat the infant until bilirubin levels drop to normal levels. We are the first confinement centre to provide this service. It avoids the hassle of going to the hospital, which can be very strenuous on both mother and newborn. 

 Also, to really avoid cross-contaminations we sterilize the rooms with a  UV light emitter . UV light destroys germs and bacteria. 

 On the other side of the  light spectrum , we use Infrared light emitters to promote healing of mothers’ wounds, especially ones after C-sections. 

 Finally, we have a baby swimming pool! Therapy done in the pool promotes brain development. 

  What does the future look like for Nejlika Confinement Care Centre?  

 Obviously we want to expand. That is the only way a business can grow. 

 We have moved from single storey to double storey within three years. We’re looking to set up branches in other places, in order to provide service to customers not within reach of us right now.

Institution Highlight: Nejlika Confinement Centre

This week we managed to get in touch with Nejlika (pronounced neh-lika) Confinement Care Centre. They provide confinement services for mothers with newborn babies. Established in 2014, Nejlika is committed to providing the best and safest form of care for the newborns’ first 28 days, and...

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  Marhabaan ! 

 Choosing to work overseas can be a monumental task. That’s why MIMS Career is committed to making your job search and hire process as easy and as clear as possible. This article is aimed for those who are interested in working in the  beautiful island-kingdom of Bahrain . 

 Bahrain is a wonderful archipelago of small islands in the Gulf, with rich culture, history, architecture and entertainment.  Read more about what it’s like to live there HERE.  

 Carry on reading to know nurses can work there. 

 Qualifications 

 First up, qualifications. 

 Bahrain’s hospital policies dictate that for foreign nurses coming in to work must have a  degree  qualification, with 3 years of experience. 

 That means you  must  have a BSN, and work as a registered nurse for at least three years or more. 

 And that’s about it. No need for  IELTS ,  NCLEX ,  TOEFL , or any other assessments. It’s fairly straightforward and is a great choice for young nurses. 

  Apply  

 Application can be done  here  or you can contact our consultants through  Facebook  and  website . 

 Our consultants will guide you through the rest of the application process by matching you with hospitals, aiding you with visa applications, housing, etc. 

 Let us help you! 

 That’s all there is to it! 

 Most people live their entire lives in the same corner of the planet that they were born in. See the same sights, live out the same routine day by day. Why should you do the same? 

 Apply for our overseas jobs. We’ll help you get there to see the world, and earn more in the process to be financially stable. Gain experience that other people would not have, and expand your horizons. 

 Hope this inspires you to take up overseas work. Respond to this article by contacting us on our  Facebook page  or  website . We’d love to hear what you think. 

  Apply for nursing jobs in Bahrain.

See The World, Expand Your Income, And Broaden Your Career Prospects By Working In Bahrain

Marhabaan ! Choosing to work overseas can be a monumental task. That’s why MIMS Career is committed to making your job search and hire process as easy and as clear as possible. This article is aimed for those who are interested in working in the beautiful island-kingdom of Bahrain ....

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 Introduction 

 Community health is the focus of the health of a population of a community group, rather than on individuals. It is a very distinct field of medicine and nursing, and therefore must be taught in a separate school of public or community health. 

 The health of a community in the current socio-economic climate poses many challenges that need to be overcome. There are many work opportunities that offer different kinds of responsibilities and skills that healthcare professionals are encouraged to look into. 

   

 In history, there are a few diseases that have caused a big impact to the world; such diseases include smallpox, polio, measles and mumps. Whilst largely eradicated today, these were debilitating diseases that caused the death of millions, often in a very short span of time. Their eradication is due to large movements by governing bodies to curb these diseases by education and clinical methods to promote mass immunities. More recently, outbreaks like dengue, malaria, and HIV/AIDS continue to pose a threat to the health and well-being of local communities. 

 Community health has caused a lot of good even in non-medical sectors. Mandatory schooling was put into place after it was found that the industrial revolution workplace was detrimental to their well-being. The science of epidemiology (the study of diseases) came about after efforts to understand cholera were being propagated by the British. Also, stronger health and safety standards for foods brought about a remarked interest in wholesome foods for the European population. 

 Why is it important? 

 Herd immunity contains the spread of contagious diseases. It is the basis on which community health (or public health, depending on which region of the world you’re from) is formed upon. 

 Herd immunity is a concept in which most members of the community are protected against that disease because there is little opportunity for an outbreak. 

 Vaccines are used extensively in this; influenza, measles, mumps, rotavirus, and several dangerous pneumococcal strains are kept at bay due to herd immunizations. These debilitating diseases are extremely dangerous when left to infect a large community. It can cause losses of life, economic downturns, and even social upheaval. 

   

 There is a growing anti-science and anti-vaccination movement that is seriously undoing all the work physicians, researchers, and epidemiologists have done. These people are averse to any form of scientific and health information that they put their communities at risk because they shun vaccinations and community health practices. 

 A major part of community health lies in the communication of healthcare. When the anti-vaccine crowd refuse to immunize their children, it puts their children and the children of others at risk of conntagions that would normally be of no issue. This fracture in the community is enough to bring back long-eradicated bugs into modern society. It is a major issue to address amongst community health practitioners, doctors, and nurses. 

 How does the work look like? 

 Community health is divided into three: primary, secondary, and tertiary. While loosely related, they all have differing lines of work, responsibility, and career progression. 

 Primary 

 Primary community healthcare focuses on the individual. These are interventions like  hand-washing, personal hygiene, immunization, circumcision, diet , and so on. 

 Health communication is key in this area. One can be a nurse, but when working in primary he/she can be a speaker to communicate these practices to the public. 

 Secondary 

 This concerns the  environment . The draining of puddles to prevent mosquito breeding, spraying of insecticides to avoid disease vectors like cockroaches , and clearing of rubbish to address rat populations are all part of this. 

 Tertiary 

 Tertiary healthcare consists of  clinical interventions . Things like rehydration, surgery, and so on. 

 How to work in community health? 

 Your options are pretty wide. You can check out the public, education, private, and non-profit sectors. 

 In the public sector, institutes like IMR (Institute of Medical Research) work closely with the Ministry of Health (KKM) to deploy methods in increasing the health and wellness of Malaysians as a population. Recently they are doing extensive work combating childhood obesity with they  myBFF (My Body is Fit and Fabulous) program . 

 The education sector will be rife of opportunities for clinicians who wish to work in a non-clinical setting. Universities, schools and colleges are potential work areas. 

 The private sector has a lot of companies waiting to get into the healthcare industry as a business. Our company  MIMS  provides timely information to educate the public and healthcare professionals on latest issues on healthcare. Also we provide a drug information service that physicians and consumers can search any time, anywhere. 

 Non-profit organizations like MAKNA (National Cancer Council Malaysia), or NKF (National Kidney Foundation) hire employees with a clinical background to help them raise awareness of the diseases or patients that they focus on. They constantly look out for people to help them with communication, treatments, and financing. 

 Career Progression 

 Search about these points below to know more about your potential career paths: 

 
	 Biostatistics programs 
	 Environmental health and science programs 
	 Social behavioral programs 
	 Epidemiology programs 
	 health services and administration programs 
 

 Search for high-paying nursing jobs on  MIMS Career . Browse, save, and apply for nursing jobs, all in one-click. Take the opportunity for higher pay and better work locations. Our pages are all mobile-responsive, allowing you to take that leap for a better job whenever, wherever you are. All our job postings are heavily screened to prevent scams and mistrustful behavior.

Career Highlight: Community Health

Introduction Community health is the focus of the health of a population of a community group, rather than on individuals. It is a very distinct field of medicine and nursing, and therefore must be taught in a separate school of public or community health. The health of a community in the...

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 Palliative care is a multidisciplinary approach to specialized medical care for people with life-limiting illnesses. It focuses on providing people with relief from the symptoms, pain, physical and mental stresses of the terminal diagnosis. The goal of such therapy is to improve quality of life for both the person and their family. 

 Palliative care is provided by a team of physicians, nurses, physiotherapists, occupational therapists and other health professionals who work together with the primary care doctors and referred specialists. It is appropriate at any age and at any stage in a serious illness and can be provided as the main goal of care of along with curative treatment. 

 Although it is an important part of end-of-life care, it is not limited to that stage. Palliative care can be provided across multiple settings including in hospitals, in the patient’s home, as part of the community palliative care programs, and in nursing facilities. Spiritual support is often provided in more interdisciplinary teams. 

 When a medicine or treatment relieves symptoms, but has no curative properties, it is said to be palliative. The word noncurative is sometimes paired with palliative for clarification purposes. 

 Scope 

 Palliative care is for patients with any serious illness and who have a physical or mental distress as a result of the treatment they are undergoing. Palliative care increases comfort by reducing pain, alleviating symptoms, and lessening stress for the patient and family. It is mutually beneficial for both patient and caregiver. 

 Emergency care nurses and doctors have a critical role to begin discussions with patients and their families regarding palliative care as they see them go through difficult times in life. 

 Paediatric palliative care is a rapidly growing subset of this field, and services directed specifically for children with serious illness are in dire need of this. 

 Responsibilities 


 
  Assessment of symptoms
 

 A method fr the assessment of symptoms in patients admitted to palliative care is the Edmonton Symptoms Assessment Scare, in which there are eight visual analog scales of 0 to 10, indicating the levels of pain, activity, nausea, depression, anxiety, drowsiness, appetite and sensation of well-being. On the scale, 0 means absent, and 10 means the worst imaginable possible. Medications are often managed at home by family or nursing support. 


   Further actions 

 Effective methods to ensuring successful palliative care is to provide a safe way for the individual to address their physical and psychological distress, that is to say their total suffering. 

 Dealing with total suffering involves addressing a wide range of concerns, starting with treating physical symptoms such as pain, nausea, and breathlessness. The palliative care teams have become very skillful in prescribing drugs for physical symptoms, and have been instrumental in showing how drugs such as morphine can be used safely while maintaining a patient’s full functions. 

 
  Importance of counselling
 

 Usually, a palliative care patient’s concerns are pain, fears of the future, uncertainties, and worries of their family and feeling like a burden. There are counselling, visual methods, cognitive therapy, and relaxation therapy to deal with it. 

 Pallliative care sees an increasingly wide range of conditions in patients at varying stage of their illness it follows that palliative care teams offer a range of care. This may range form managing the physical symptoms in patients receiving treatment for cancer, to treating depression in patients with advanced disease, to the care of patients in their last days and hours. 

 Training 

 In most countries hospice and palliative care is provided by an interdisciplinary team consisting of physicians, pharmacists, registered nurses, nursing assistant, social workers, and others. The focus on the team is to optimize the patient’s comfort. 

 Nurses in palliative care are given extensive training in counselling, medication dispensing, and support. The aim is about relieving distressing symptoms for the patient. Nurses are also part of the management of the imminently dying patient, more so than the physicians or doctors themselves. 

 Work Opportunities 

 The work opportunities that we get is aplenty. Palliative care is often used interchageably as a term with hospice care, albeit some slight differences. They share some similar goals of providing symptom relief and pain management. Palliative care services can be offered to any patient without restriction to disease or prognosis, and can be appropriate for anyone with a serious, complex illness, whether they are expected to recover fully or not. 

 Hospice is a type of care involving palliation without curative intent. usually it is used for people with no further options for curing their disease or in people who have decided to not pursue treatment that is hard on them. 

 Typically hospice and palliative care nurses work in non-hospital settings.

Career Highlight: Palliative Care

Palliative care is a multidisciplinary approach to specialized medical care for people with life-limiting illnesses. It focuses on providing people with relief from the symptoms, pain, physical and mental stresses of the terminal diagnosis. The goal of such therapy is to improve quality of life...

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 Our team got to know about this privately-run nursing in a cozy neighborhood of Petaling Jaya. Impresif Home Care is run by a total of 3 nurses, 7 workers and their supervisor. We had the chance to speak to the supervisor, Raja. Raja is a wonderful guy, and based on just a few conversations with him you can really tell that he cares a lot about what goes on in the nursing home and its occupants. 

 Impresif Care Home is looking to hire staff nurses with minimal experience to help with their workload.  Visit their job listing page to apply.  

 
  What is the vision behind your nursing home? How did it come about?  

 The home was a house bought by our founders, En. Mohd Faizal and his wife Pn Zainab. Pn. Zainab was a matron for a big hospital. There she realized that a lot of patients still require care, but since they can’t stay admitted for too long they are discharged. 

 It was disheartening to see that, so she and her husband founded this home. We have been privately funded ever since, and do not rely on donations. 

 We have about 30 occupants, with the age range being from 55 to 90 years old. Some of them have children who are not able to take care of them; it is cheaper to send the parents here for nursing care compared to hiring a nurse who comes to the house, which can be very expensive. Some of the occupants here just do not have anywhere to go… but we are grateful we can still support them here. 

  How is the home culture like? 
 
   

 A lot of people come here to visit, thinking it to be depressed and lonely for the elderly to be here. But it’s actually a lot of fun! Everyone tries their best to be happy. I myself have never been happier in my life, now that I’m working here looking after other people. 

 It’s a relatively slow working lifestyle. We wake the occupants up at 630am, then prepare breakfast, wash, clean them, and take them out for exercise. Those who need parenteral feeding will be fed by our nurses. We have lunch around noon, and then it’s some TV time followed by an afternoon nap. Dinner is at 7, then it’s free and easy. 

 Weekends are a bit busier. Relatives and children come over to visit, and will ask the staff questions like “What medication is he/she on?”, or “How has my father been this week?”, things like that. 

 This is a suitable place for nurses out of nursing school to gain some experience before going on to do their Degrees or Post-Basics. The occupants here are all low-dependency type of patients. 

  What do you do to make your staff happy and enjoy working here?  

 It helps that the elderly are all funny and exciting in their own way. I always get “invited” to any one of the uncles or aunties houses. I’ve worked here for 8 years and I still don’t know where their “houses” are.  laughs  

 The location of the home is very nice and quiet. It has easy access to the Federal Highway and the New Pantai Expressway, so staff can easily get here from all over. It can be tiring at times but not as busy as hospital work, and they get paid well too. 

  What cool pieces of tech do you have in your clinic?  

 Everyone has their own wheelchair! So they can decorate or personalize it to fit their own characters. Some carry small tokens on their wheelchairs to remind them of people or places they used to meet. 

 We have fully adjustable beds like the ones in hospitals for our more needy occupants. 

 Our dispensary is always kept fully-stocked. 

  What kind of people are you looking to hire as your staff?  

 We’re looking for nurses who are patient, hardworking, and with a soft heart for the elderly. Applicant must also be willing to work six days a week, especially on weekends. That’s when we’re the most busy. 

  How does your staff get hired?  

 Our nurses gets hired by Pn. Zainab. She talks to the nurses that is going to work here. It’s not much of a screening; it’s just to get to know who you are as a person and how you’ll do your work. 

 We take our staff from maid agencies, so they’re mostly Indonesian. 

  What does the future of this nursing home look like?  

 We want to keep doing what we do for a long time. We’re looking to increase the number of nurses that we employ to help the current workforce cope better with the workload. At the moment we are looking to hire any qualified nurses, even ones with minimal work experience. We’ll help to guide you in the right direction. 

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Institution Highlight: Impresif Care Nursing Home

Our team got to know about this privately-run nursing in a cozy neighborhood of Petaling Jaya. Impresif Home Care is run by a total of 3 nurses, 7 workers and their supervisor. We had the chance to speak to the supervisor, Raja. Raja is a wonderful guy, and based on just a few conversations with...

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 Gynaecology is the medical practice of dealing with the health of the female reproductive system and the breasts. Literally the term gynaecology means “the study of women.” The opposite of gynaecology is andrology, which deals in male-specific medical issues. 

  Almost all modern gynaecologists are obstetricians : physicians who deal in the branch of medicine and surgery of childbirth and labor. These two fields overlap in many areas, therefore in many institutions Obstetrics and Gynaecology are lumped together as O&G. 

 Gynaecology is concerned with the health of the female reproductive organs and the ability to reproduce. It also encompasses paediatric and adolescent problems to post-menopausal ages. 

 History 

 From ancient Egypt circa 1800 BC, the Kahun Gynaecological Papyrus is the oldest known medical text of any kind. It writes about women’s complaints; gynaecological diseases, fertility, pregnancy, contraception, etc. In the 4th century BC Hippocrates wrote texts about gynaecological diseases that were common afflictions to Greek women at the time. 

 J Marion Sims is widely considered to be the father of gynaecology. He operated during the 19th century at Jefferson Medical College, New York. However the title is now being scrutinized due to his unethical development of his surgical techniques. He operated a lot on slaves, many of whom were not given anaesthesia. 

 Training 

 Post-basic courses on midwifery, gynaecology, and obstetrics are considered to be part of gynaecological training. If desired, a nurse can opt to pursue a Masters in order to carry out research work in the field, and proceed to doctorate studies. 

 Training is given out to encourage the study and advancement of the practice of gynaecology. It is also done by the publication of clinical guidelines and reports on aspects of the specialty and service provision. 

 Gynaecology is a vast field. Nurses who work in this area have sub-specialties in high-risk obstetrics, fertility care, or minimal access surgery. The job most deals with healthy women, where unexpected challenges can present themselves on a daily basis. Work includes a large number of hands-on procedures, and training reflects that. 

 Common Cases 

 Patients range from those who have chronic disorders which are not life threatening, to those who require immediate acute emergency treatment. 

 Nurses in this field are often required to provide assistance during operative procedures. Some of the common procedures a gynaecological nurse with oversee include: 

 
	 dilation and curettage 
	 Oophorectomy 
	 Exploratory laparotomy 
	 Treatments for urinary incontinence 
	 Cervical excision procedures 
	 treatment of polyps 
	 surgery for cancers 
 

 A major part of a gynaecology nurse is the delivery of infants. Their work includes: 

 
	 assist delivery using instruments (forceps or vacuum) 
	 C-sections 
	 Foetal health 
 

 Career Opportunities 

 
	 Independent Nurse Consultant 
	 Educator 
	 Training programme director for gynaecology nursing 
	 
	 Research in public and private sectors 
	 
	 - 
 
   

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Career Highlight: Gynaecology Nursing

Gynaecology is the medical practice of dealing with the health of the female reproductive system and the breasts. Literally the term gynaecology means “the study of women.” The opposite of gynaecology is andrology, which deals in male-specific medical issues. Almost all modern...

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