How to Work as A Nurse in Singapore

Working overseas, while initially scary, can be one of the best decisions you ever make. Being outside your comfort zone forces you to grow as you are tested by challenges that not many people will get the opportunity to go through.

Depending on where you go, it can be very different from back home. This change in environment builds confidence as a result of changes in your perspective. Not only will it look good on your resume for future career opportunities, a new country is a land of endless discovery that you can make during your downtime after work.

Fancy yourself working as a registered nurse in high-tech, ultra-modern Singapore? Nurses are in high demand, and studies project that it will continue to be high in the years to come. Read on to find out more!

About Singapore
Be a registered nurse, and have job offer
Register with SNB
Pay the required fees
Obtain a Work Pass

About Singapore:

A prominent city-state in South-East Asia, Singapore is a truly remarkable place to be. It is seeing an increasing amount of demand for foreign nurses to be employed in the home care sector, although private healthcare institutions are on the rise too. Geographically and culturally similar to Malaysia, so you won’t have too many problems adjusting to the life over there. There are an approximate total of 39,005 nurses in Singapore according to the Ministry of Health, and the number is steadily increasing over the years to meet demand.

Be a registered nurse, and have job offer

First you’ll need to complete nursing school/training, and have nursing registration. For those considering migration but have not completed your nursing programmes, the form for registration with MOH (Kementrian Kesihatan Malaysia) can be found here. Once that is out of the way, you need to have a job offer by a healthcare institution in Singapore first before you can proceed. Pro tip: browse through MIMS Career portal. It’s easy to get connected with potential employers!

Register with SNB

After being offered, then comes the task of registering with the Singapore Nursing Board (SNB). There are three things to do here: the first is to apply online, prepare documents for them, and to pay the stipulated fees.

The documents required are:

It’s important to note that those documents, if not in English, have to be accompanied with certified translated copies. The easiest way to do this is to get it certified by a Commissioner of Oath nearest to you. Also prepare some “setem hasil” (Duty stamps), which cost RM10 a piece.

These documents, once copied and certified true, will only be accepted in hard copy by mail or in person by SNB.

Pay the required fees

The fee for application is SGD60 for Foreign-trained nurses. Upon confirmation of registration, there is another fee to be paid, which is your registration fee. It costs about SGD55. You can see the SNB Fees table here.

The process would take about three months, depending on situation. Once SNB approves you, you would be required to either:

Obtain a Work Pass

Finally, head towards the the Ministry of Manpower Singapore’s site to check what sort of work pass you would need before starting your work stint in Singapore. There are many passes available, so choose wisely! Make sure you double check with your Singapore employer before confirming anything. They should be able to advise you on this.

Living in Singapore

Singapore is a small, hyperactive country. There are a lot of things to see and do during your downtime. Food lovers rejoice! Home to diverse ethnic groups, Singapore features the best of Chinese, Malay, and Indian cuisine you can find in the region. Take advantage of the numerous food courts the country has. They’re reasonably priced and you can really find some culinary gems. Due to stringent laws, they’re hygienic too!

World-class events always make a stop at Singapore. Concerts, charity events, shows… you name it.

Traveling to and fro your home country from Changi airport is a breeze. Many companies in Singapore set up shop as a regional hub for doing business across the Asia-Pacific region. As a consequence, many jobs here will have a broader regional scope, so travellers frequently travel in and out the city-state. Because of this, Changi airport is the most efficient in the world.

Miss Malaysian food, culture, and quirks? Johor Bahru is just right across the Causeway (or Second Link, depending on which route you take). The city has seen a rapid modernization in recent years, and will serve as a great relief for homesickness.

Public transport is cheap and efficient. Owning a car in Singapore might be a daunting task, but you can comfortably get by with your commute to work on their extensive network of buses, MRTs, and taxis.

Crime rate is incredibly low. It is not uncommon to see women walking back home alone in the streets at night, by herself. With a little precaution, you can get around with ease. Your family back home will worry less, so you can have a peace of mind.

Conclusion

Interested in working in Singapore as a nurse? Signup with MIMS Career, and discover hundreds of job postings for nurses in the country. Just signup, input your details and resume, and you will be able to apply for those job posts with a single click. Not only that, you can save jobs you are interested in for later viewing.

Can’t find what you’re looking for? Set up job alerts so we can notify you of new employers that meet your search criteria.

Signup with MIMS Career and take your first step in the path to working overseas. It’s safe, simple, and free.



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 A close relative of mine is a young nurse. Two years ago she started taking care of this nice lady who was partially paralysed; her breathing muscles would no longer function autonomously, hence a tracheostomy was done so she could breathe. The condition left her bed-ridden on bad days, and wheel-chair bound on good ones. 

 She cared for the lady to the best of her abilities, for about 18 months. One day the lady started feeling cold. She was sweating and shivering at the same time. She went unconscious, and had five cardiac arrests within 36 hours. 

 After unsuccessfully trying to stabilize her blood pressure, she died of heart failure. The young nurse was devastated. It wasn’t her own mother, but it might as well seemed like it. It was her first patient death while working as a nurse. It affected her so much she found it difficult to work for the next week. 

 This experience is shared by many nurses in the country. How nurses bond with their patients depends on circumstances and the length of time they provided care to them. A strong bond between patient and nurse is essential to effective nursing, but when death happens, it can deal a very significant blow. 

 The first death of your patient can massively impact you as a nurse. So will subsequent ones. 

 It is extremely important that this doesn’t mentally compromise your ability to do your work. 

 How can you, as a nurse, deal with it? 

 1. It’s okay to feel emotions. Embrace it fully. 

 You are human. You are in a compassionate profession: the very basis of nursing started on the principle to relieve pain, assuage suffering, and provide help to those of ailing health. 

 It is okay to feel overwhelmed at first, especially when you have cared for the patient for so long. 

 Empathy is good for your job, it makes you a better nurse, but it makes loss more painful. 

 Allow yourself some time to feel, and understand your emotions. 

 Your line of work is to care for people, the noblest of all human traits. Your grief on the death of your patient means that you have done your job. 

 2. Try to accept the death happened. 

 Some wards have it harder than others for this. 

 A geriatric ward would have the oldest, most needy patients. Conducting CPR on these patients can be cruel, especially if you or your team are not willing to “let go” of the patient. 

 However, death in these parts of the hospital would be a routine part of the day. It is wise to accept it, so you can continue giving out the best care to the other still-living patients without letting it affect the quality of your work. 

 Accept their deaths, and the fact that you have done all you could to alleviate their suffering. Know that you have done your best to keep them comfortable and retain their dignity. 

 3. Remain in control and neutral if breaking the news to the family. Don’t add to the problem. 

 It is okay to share your emotions with the patient’s loved ones. 

 Respect the family; if they do not wish you to partake in their grief, then kindly leave them alone. They have also gone through much, just like you. 

 Some relatives will blame the doctor/nurse for causing the death. Don’t take this to heart. The Kubler-Ross model of grief lays out five stages, and anger is one of them. 
Find your own ways to vent, either through support groups, family, or colleagues. 

 4. Talk about it. Don’t bottle it in. 

 One of the best things about being in the nursing workforce is that you’re surrounded by people who have gone through similar experiences too. 

 Death is prevalent amongst healthcare professions, and sometimes just talking to a senior can help a lot. 

 Find someone you’re comfortable with. It can be a senior nurse, a matron, or even your other colleagues in the ward. 

 Ask them how they managed to overcome such periods of distress. Pour out whatever you’re feeling to them; it is very likely that they have felt everything you are feeling right now. 

 Talking about it helps you make sense of what you’re feeling. By articulating it into words, you can pinpoint exactly what’s bothering you, and help you to come to terms. 

 5. Realize that these things happen. 

 Things happen. Death is part and parcel of the life in a hospital. Some areas will be more prone to dealing with death than others, like the ER, surgical ward, the ICU. 
You might find yourself poring over the moments that led up to the death in your mind, going over what you could have done better, what you could have done differently. 

 This leads to a general feeling of guilt. This can be very destructive to your well-being, and can affect the performance of your work to other patient who also need your care. This is not a good coping mechanism if it jeopardizes the health of your other patients. 

 6. Believe that you are making a difference. 

 The death of a patient does not equal to failure. 

 How you deal with the patient’s relatives is an extension of how you treated their late relative. 

 For all the grief that you may be feeling right now, the patient’s family has it harder. 

 Showing that you cared provides a monumental difference, and leads the family to a safer path of acceptance. 

 Conclusion 

 The trait that sets humans apart from other species is our ability to empathize for our fellow brethren. 

 Other fauna have demonstrated this to a certain degree, but only humans have been able to take it to their very core, make it into their reason to live, and deliver it back to their community. 

 Nursing is more than just facts or skills or the amount of certifications that you can obtain to move your career. It is founded on empathy; the ability to understand others’ suffering and pain. 

 During times when you feel overwhelmed or devastated by the loss of your patient, stand firm and be proud of who you are, because nurses do things that not many will have the capacity to accomplish. 

 You will find your way to deal with it as you become more experienced, and become better at learning what is the best way to help families cope with grief over time. 

 Steel your heart, adjust that uniform, and carry on providing the best that you can give to your other patients.

How to Cope with Death and Loss, as A Nurse

A close relative of mine is a young nurse. Two years ago she started taking care of this nice lady who was partially paralysed; her breathing muscles would no longer function autonomously, hence a tracheostomy was done so she could breathe. The...

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 Finding a new job can be very tiring, and time-consuming. It can be difficult to schedule some time to your job-seeking activities. However, the end of the year is a period of time you don’t want to miss if you want to maximize your chances of landing that precious new job. Here are four reasons why: 

  1. Employers are getting ready for the New Year  

   

 Traditionally people wouldn’t advise you to hunt for a job at the end of the year, when employers have maxed their yearly budgets and are just closing the financial year with some wrap-up activities. 

 But growing evidence seems to suggest otherwise: as employers return from the holidays with a renewed vigor, new goals, and new KPIs, they are more inclined to act upon your application immediately. 

  2. Employers have plans for 2018  

   

 Whether its a big hospital, a small clinic, or a humble retirement home, everybody uses the last few weeks of the year to reflect back on their performance in order to stay afloat. It is normally during these periods of time that they make the decision to allocate budgets to hire new staff… 

 So get to applying! 

  3. You’re ready to apply for one  

   

 The best time to apply for a job is also whenever you feel you’re ready. 

 When you want new experiences, new training, different exposure, or an increase in salary… you know it’s time to go. 

 So update your resume, acquire new skills, and hunt for that job. 

  4. You’re starting to feel miserable at your job  
 
  
Find yourself feeling unnaturally tired? Even if you’ve been getting enough sleep? 

 If you’ve been exhibiting signs of stress due to your current job like fatigue, headaches, migraines and depression, it’s probably a sign that you should cut your losses and look for opportunities elsewhere. 

 Don’t think it’s your fault for not being able to fit in… sometimes the shoe just doesn’t fit.

4 Reasons You Should Apply For A New Job NOW

Finding a new job can be very tiring, and time-consuming. It can be difficult to schedule some time to your job-seeking activities. However, the end of the year is a period of time you don’t want to miss if you want to maximize your...

Read More