How to Work as A Nurse in Singapore

Working overseas, while initially scary, can be one of the best decisions you ever make. Being outside your comfort zone forces you to grow as you are tested by challenges that not many people will get the opportunity to go through.

Depending on where you go, it can be very different from back home. This change in environment builds confidence as a result of changes in your perspective. Not only will it look good on your resume for future career opportunities, a new country is a land of endless discovery that you can make during your downtime after work.

Fancy yourself working as a registered nurse in high-tech, ultra-modern Singapore? Nurses are in high demand, and studies project that it will continue to be high in the years to come. Read on to find out more!

About Singapore
Be a registered nurse, and have job offer
Register with SNB
Pay the required fees
Obtain a Work Pass

About Singapore:

A prominent city-state in South-East Asia, Singapore is a truly remarkable place to be. It is seeing an increasing amount of demand for foreign nurses to be employed in the home care sector, although private healthcare institutions are on the rise too. Geographically and culturally similar to Malaysia, so you won’t have too many problems adjusting to the life over there. There are an approximate total of 39,005 nurses in Singapore according to the Ministry of Health, and the number is steadily increasing over the years to meet demand.

Be a registered nurse, and have job offer

First you’ll need to complete nursing school/training, and have nursing registration. For those considering migration but have not completed your nursing programmes, the form for registration with MOH (Kementrian Kesihatan Malaysia) can be found here. Once that is out of the way, you need to have a job offer by a healthcare institution in Singapore first before you can proceed. Pro tip: browse through MIMS Career portal. It’s easy to get connected with potential employers!

Register with SNB

After being offered, then comes the task of registering with the Singapore Nursing Board (SNB). There are three things to do here: the first is to apply online, prepare documents for them, and to pay the stipulated fees.

The documents required are:

It’s important to note that those documents, if not in English, have to be accompanied with certified translated copies. The easiest way to do this is to get it certified by a Commissioner of Oath nearest to you. Also prepare some “setem hasil” (Duty stamps), which cost RM10 a piece.

These documents, once copied and certified true, will only be accepted in hard copy by mail or in person by SNB.

Pay the required fees

The fee for application is SGD60 for Foreign-trained nurses. Upon confirmation of registration, there is another fee to be paid, which is your registration fee. It costs about SGD55. You can see the SNB Fees table here.

The process would take about three months, depending on situation. Once SNB approves you, you would be required to either:

Obtain a Work Pass

Finally, head towards the the Ministry of Manpower Singapore’s site to check what sort of work pass you would need before starting your work stint in Singapore. There are many passes available, so choose wisely! Make sure you double check with your Singapore employer before confirming anything. They should be able to advise you on this.

Living in Singapore

Singapore is a small, hyperactive country. There are a lot of things to see and do during your downtime. Food lovers rejoice! Home to diverse ethnic groups, Singapore features the best of Chinese, Malay, and Indian cuisine you can find in the region. Take advantage of the numerous food courts the country has. They’re reasonably priced and you can really find some culinary gems. Due to stringent laws, they’re hygienic too!

World-class events always make a stop at Singapore. Concerts, charity events, shows… you name it.

Traveling to and fro your home country from Changi airport is a breeze. Many companies in Singapore set up shop as a regional hub for doing business across the Asia-Pacific region. As a consequence, many jobs here will have a broader regional scope, so travellers frequently travel in and out the city-state. Because of this, Changi airport is the most efficient in the world.

Miss Malaysian food, culture, and quirks? Johor Bahru is just right across the Causeway (or Second Link, depending on which route you take). The city has seen a rapid modernization in recent years, and will serve as a great relief for homesickness.

Public transport is cheap and efficient. Owning a car in Singapore might be a daunting task, but you can comfortably get by with your commute to work on their extensive network of buses, MRTs, and taxis.

Crime rate is incredibly low. It is not uncommon to see women walking back home alone in the streets at night, by herself. With a little precaution, you can get around with ease. Your family back home will worry less, so you can have a peace of mind.

Conclusion

Interested in working in Singapore as a nurse? Signup with MIMS Career, and discover hundreds of job postings for nurses in the country. Just signup, input your details and resume, and you will be able to apply for those job posts with a single click. Not only that, you can save jobs you are interested in for later viewing.

Can’t find what you’re looking for? Set up job alerts so we can notify you of new employers that meet your search criteria.

Signup with MIMS Career and take your first step in the path to working overseas. It’s safe, simple, and free.



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 Why do we, as nursing professionals, have to put in effort to continuously learn? 

 The rate of progress in technology is growing at an exponential rate. The more things we discover, the faster we do it. What we learnt in nursing school 10 years ago might already be obsolete next year. As nurses, we are at risk of endangering our patients as our skills are steadily becoming more outdated. 

 Lifelong learning is a term that is freely being thrown around these past two decades. Lifelong learning means that education does not end at the academic level upon graduation; it means new skills, knowledge, and practices are always there to be learnt to improve oneself. 

 New Methods of Nursing 

 Take CPR, for example. 

 A vital procedure, many lives are saved with it. You would think that for something used so much in hospitals, it would be a science that’s very well established. 

 Unfortunately, no. Researchers and new observations change the way CPR is done. A decade ago, CPR was considered futile after a certain amount of time. Now, you are encouraged to  not give up  those chest compressions until medical help arrives. 

 Even the steps for CPR ten years ago are in different order. It used to be A-B-C; clear Airway, apply rescue breaths, then begin compressions.  Now compressions come first and foremost . The reason is because rescue breaths lower chest cavity air pressure, slowing circulation (which is exactly what we do not want in cardiac arrest). 

 The new methods are more effective than the older ones. And it took only ten years for the old methods to become obsolete. 

 Not knowing the newer, more effective method could cost someone his/her life. 

 Renewing Your Nursing License 

 In Malaysia, you have to renew your license every year. 

 When you renew your license, they will check your CPD points:  Continuous Professional Development  points. These are points that you gain when you go for any nursing related courses. 

 For example, attend a Midwifery course and gain 5 CPD points. Attend a Wound Management course and get 3. 

 These points accumulate throughout the year, and when you want to renew your license, you need about 20-30 points. Otherwise, you will not be able to renew, thus leaving you without any form of registration. Meaning you can’t practice nursing! 

 Improving care towards patients 

 Nurses with a higher level of education are able to think more critically of their patients. They are able to aid in diagnosis, notice patterns in communication, and other physical cues that would help in determining the best course of treatment. 

 A nurse with a post-basic in cardiology is much more useful to a cardiologist compared to a general staff nurse. They can work together, exchange information, and execute procedures that the latter would not normally have the ability to do. 

 21st Century patients 

 Nowadays, patients are have more access to information than ever before. They are more learned, and have different set of expectations. They query a lot; so nurses have to be armed with the right set of information to cater to these patients. It goes a long way in establishing their trust towards you. 

 A good nurse-patient relationship is very important to achieve successful recovery. 

 Great nurses are always on the lookout for new, exciting, and better opportunities to grow their career. Find out your next employment with MIMS Career, a fast, secure, and convenient portal to connect you to top-class healthcare employers in MY, SG, ID, and PH.

The Importance of Lifelong Learning for Nurses

Why do we, as nursing professionals, have to put in effort to continuously learn? The rate of progress in technology is growing at an exponential rate. The more things we discover, the faster we do it. What we learnt in nursing school 10...

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 Intensive care nursing 

 Intensive care nursing or critical care nursing is a branch of medicine concerned with the diagnosis and management of life-threatening conditions requiring sophisticated organ support and invasive monitoring. 

 Overview 

 Patients requiring intensive care may require support for instability, airway or respiratory compromise, acute renal failure, potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmias, or the cumulative effects of multiple organ failure. It is also commonly known now as multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. They may also be admitted for intensive or invasive monitoring, such as the crucial hours after major surgery when deemed too unstable to transfer to a less intenseively monitored unit. 

 Intensive care is usually only offered to those whose condition is potentially reversible and who have a good chance of surviving with intensive care support. A prime requisite for admission to an intensive care unit is that the underlying condition can be overcome. Patients with a non-overcomeable condition are not admitted into intensive care units (ICU). 

 ICUs are the most expensive area of nursing or medical care. It is also the most technologically advanced, requiring nurses with a higher level of qualifications and education than most. Telemetry, data-analysis, and surgical procedures are all part and parcel of the ICU nurse’s daily responsibilities. 

 Work Location 

   
ICU or Critical Care nurses are provisioned in a specialized unit of a hospital called the intensive care unit (ICU) or critical care unit (CCU). Many hospitals have also designated intensive care areas for certain specialties of medicine, such as: 

 
	 the coronary intensive unit for heart disease 
	 medical intensive care unit 
	 surgical intensive care unit 
	 pediatric intensive care unit 
	 neuroscience critical care unit 
	 overnight intensive recovery unit 
	 shock/trauma intensive care unit 
	 Neonatal 
	 and more 
 

 The terminologies and nomenclature of these units may vary from hospital to hospital. They are also subject to funding, research capability, and availability of trained medical staff. 

 Equipment and systems in unit 

 In the ICU/CCU nurses are required to fundamentally understand and able to operate certain equipment and systems that are critical to the survival of the patient admitted. Common equipment in the unit includes mechanical ventilation to assist breathing through an endotracheal tube or a tracheotomy; hemofiltration equipment for acute renal failure; monitoring equipment; intravenous lines for drug insusions or total parenteral nutrition. 

 A wide array of drugs are also kept in the ICU/CCU, such as inotropes, sedatives, broad spectrum antibiotics and analgesics. 

 Work staff 

 Intensive care/critical care medicine is a relatively new but increasingly important medical specialty. The ICU/CCU is staffed by multidisciplinary and multiprofessional teams including nurses, respiratory therapists, physicians and critical care pharmacists. Doctors with training in intensive care are called intensivists; ICU/CCU nurses are a major form of support for this group. 

 Training 

 ICU nurses will have completed a minimum of three years as a registered nurse following their nursing diploma or degree. Depending on the hospital, ICU nurses may have opted to do a BSN or MSN in order to develop the critical thinking skills required of medical staff in a such a high dependency ward. 

 A post-basic certification in ICU care is commonly around the duration of 12-24 months, where nurses in training will cover internal medicine, pediatrics, anesthesiology, surgery, and emergency medicine. 

 Nurses may also pursue additional education and training in critical care medicine leading to certification by bodies such as the American Association of Critical Care Nurses. This certification carries a lot of weight in terms of qualification for those seeking career advancement. 

 ICU/CCU nurses choose to specialize in one or more of the nine key systems, which are: 

 
	 Cardiovascular system 
	 Central nervous system 
	 endocrine system 
	 gastro-intestinal 
	 haematology 
	 microbiology 
	 peripheries 
	 renal 
	 respiratory system 
 

 Work Conditions 

 Common tasks and responsibilities 

  Hypoxemic Respiratory Failure 
   
The primary aim in treatment of this kind of failure is maintenance of adequate oxygenation, while limiting ventilator-induced lung injury and oxygen toxicity. 

  Assist Patients to Wean Off Mechanical Ventilation 
   
Weaning is the process of gradual withdrawal of mechanical ventilation. The process is uneventful in most patients, but may take up half the time on a ventilator in problematic patients. Nurses are to assess the readiness of patient to wean using clinical and objective measures, and moderate weaning failure on difficult-to-wean patients. 

  Inotropic and Vasopressor Support for Hypotensive Patients 
   
This treatment aims to maintain a perfusion pressure necessary for tissue oxygenation in patients with hypotension and inadequate tissue perfusion. Tasks are to correct hypovolemia, titrate doses of inotropes and vasopressors to targeted levels, monitoring of blood pressure via the arterial line, and prevent septic shock. 

  Feeding via Enteral or Parenteral Methods 
   
In ICU care, nutritional therapy is plays an important part. The goal is to provide adequate calories and protein to keep up with ongoing losses, prevent or correct nutrient deficiencies and promote wound healing and immune function. 

 Work Opportunities 

  Search for high-paying ICU/CCU nursing jobs  on  MIMS Career . Browse, save, and apply for nursing jobs, all in one-click. Take the opportunity for higher pay and better work locations. Our pages are all mobile-responsive, allowing you to take that leap for a better job whenever, wherever you are. All our job postings are  heavily screened to prevent scams and mistrustful behavior.  
   

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Intensive care nursing Intensive care nursing or critical care nursing is a branch of medicine concerned with the diagnosis and management of life-threatening conditions requiring sophisticated organ support and invasive monitoring....

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