Think About These 5 Things Before You Decide On A Specialization

Now that you’re a registered nurse, what’s next? You’ve completed nursing school, gone on to work a few years and have gained experience in some wards. You decide that you want to pursue a specialization, for their multiple career growth benefits. Or maybe it’s for the higher salary that you have the potential to earn as a specialized nurse.

But hold your horses. While the benefits can be very enticing, choosing a specialization demands time, energy, and finances that you must be willing to sacrifice for a set period of time. You might not even see immediate benefits; they might come later in your career.

Still interested? Good. The nation needs more nurses like you. Ambitious nurses who are passionate about developing themselves and striving towards self-improvement. Here are five things your should consider before choosing your nursing specialty.

1. What Is Your Motivation To Pursue This Specialty?

What do you want to achieve by becoming a renal nurse? A perioperative nurse? A geriatric nurse?

You need to know what is exactly the reason for your interest in the specialty field of your choice. You want to help others? Is money a motivating factor? These are all acceptable reasons. If you are thinking of pursuing a specialization because of a family member or friend’s influence, that is fine, as long as your goals and objectives are in line with theirs.

Ultimately you are the one who has to go through and live with the decision. Knowing what motivates you will help you stay focused and succeed later, even through trying times.

2. How Are You Going to Obtain the Education and Training Needed for Your Specialization?

You should research a bit about the diplomas, post-basic certifications, degrees, and training courses that are required for the specialty you wish to take.

You can read up our guide to career advancement for nurses here.

Being a high-level nurse is a remarkable investment of money and time. It would be wise for you to think out how to pay for your education, and balance doing that with completing the required coursework.

If you have only a diploma in nursing and need to obtain your BSN degree from an expensive institution, a bit of planning ahead can help you save up for tuition fees. Some universities offer financial assistance that you can take advantage of.

Read here for our article on how to increase your income as a nurse. Every little increase in salary helps over time. It could mean the difference in you being able to take that course next year, or in two more years.

3. Does This Specialization Fit Your Strengths And Personality?

Not good around kids? Finding it hard to connect with younger patients? Then don’t take up paediatric nursing.

Are you a high-energy, challenge-seeking nurse that likes difficult situations? Or do you love to be in a more stable setting, working one day at a time, employing your full focus on things that matter? Are you an introvert? Extrovert?

Each specialization requires different skillsets and personality traits. Consider this well and evaluate how the work would mesh with your personality.

4. How Will This Impact Your Family And Personal Life?

Think wisely and carefully about this. Consider how your family might be affected if you have to work nights, weekends, or on call. Some courses are done at night after work.

Some employers do not grant study leave to their nurses. Think about how your family might be financially impacted if you were to quit your current job in order to study.

It is imperative you give it some thought now before you make the leap into your specialization.

5. Where Do You Want To Work?

Based on your working experiences, where do you think you’d like to work? Most importantly, which type of environment would you be most comfortable, and most successful?

If working conditions at hospitals are too hectic and large, then specializing as a cardiac nurse in cardiology would not be a good idea. Maybe you’d like to work more regular hours, in a small nursing center. Specializing in nephrology to become a renal/dialysis nurse would be a great idea. Some would also opt to practice nursing independently, doing house calls. A specialization in home care would be the best course of action.

Do you want to work near where you live? Or are you willing to move to another city for better prospects? Don’t limit yourself! Nurses are still needed at places you wouldn’t normally think of, like military bases or schools.

To get an idea of what nursing jobs are available in the area you wish to work in, check out our job portal, MIMS Career. Search for nursing jobs across Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia and the Philippines. New jobs and vacancies are being updated every day. Browse through our extensive database, and apply with our convenient 1-click process.



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 For those nurses serving with  Kementrian Kesihatan Malaysia  (KKM), the start of your work life will present you with one of the toughest choices you’ll make: 

 
 EPF (Employees’ Provident Fund, also known as KWSP), or choose the pension fund? 
 

 Both are viable options in securing your financial health after you retire. Although retirement might seem like ages away, a good amount of planning and successful investments can mean the difference between being able to live comfortably in your golden years, or struggle with daily or medical expenses. 

 So which to choose? We’ll break down the points below. 

 Pension fund 

  What is it?  
It’s a monthly stipend of a set amount, provided by the Public Services Department upon your retirement. In addition to that, you also receive a  gratuity  payment, and medical/health benefits. 

  Calculation  
Here we will be assuming that you start work at 20 years old, with a starting salary of RM2,000, and continue working until you retire at 55 with a salary of RM5,600 (3% annual pay increase). 

 Your monthly pension will be your last drawn salary, divided by two. For example, if your base salary is RM5,000 when you retire, your monthly stipend will be RM2,800/mo. 

 In addition to that, you will receive gratuity payment, which is calculated as such: 

 
 gratuity = 7.5% x 35yrs x 12 months x RM5,600 (final drawn salary) 
= RM 176,400. 
 

 RM176,400 will be given as a lump sum, while RM2,800 will be given per month. Again, this is all assuming you retire at 55, with a final salary of RM5,600. 

  Benefits  

 
	 No subtraction from base pay. 
 

 Unlike EPF, as we will see later, there is no subtraction from your base salary. 

 
	 Guaranteed monthly retirement funding 
 

 Again, unlike EPF, where your money can be withdrawn for other uses, pension takers are guaranteed to have a monthly source of income. 

  Disadvantages  

 
	 You have to start and end your service in the public/government sector. It might hamper your ability to seek work overseas, better base salaries, or even some chances to study. 
 

 EPF or Employees Provident Fund (KWSP - Kumpulan Simpanan Wang Pekerja) 

  What is it?  
EPF is the accumulation of savings generated from deductions of your base salary. Currently, you can choose either 11%, or 8%, as  recently announced . 

 This accumulation of money is further grown by annual dividends. On average the dividend is around 6%, depending on the GDP (gross domestic product) of the country. 

 What makes EPF great as long term savings is due to the magic of  compound interest. . Your employer also contributes to your fund (12% of your pay). These two things make an EPF account grow substantially when properly managed. 

  2 accounts  

 Your EPF savings are divided into two accounts. 70% goes into account 1, and the rest to account 2. Account 1 is your retirement funds. Account 2 is withdrawable, under a few conditions: 

 
	 more than 50 years old 
	 Housing downpayment for your 1st house 
	 housing loan payment 
	 education 
	 medical costs 
	 Hajj pilgrimage 
 

 Upon reaching the age of 55, you will be able to withdraw from account 1. You will have to choose to withdraw one lump sum, or as a monthly stipend like a pension. 

  Calculation  

 Let’s take the same example as just now. Start work at 20, salary RM2,000, retire at 55, salary RM5,000. 

 
 Deduction from pay = 11% = RM220 
Employer contribution = 12% = RM240 
 We will assume no withdrawals are made over entire working period  
EPF annual dividend = 6% 
 

 The interest adds up year over year, and with the help of EPF’s  online calculator , 

 Total EPF savings at 55 years old = RM461,900 

 It is a marginally higher amount than RM176,400 gratuity you will receive from a pension. 

  Benefits  

 
	 Flexibility. At the age of 55, you can withdraw that money and invest in another scheme, venture, or fund that offers greater returns. 
	 Faster growth. As shown, even with a contribution of 11% of your pay, over the course of 35 years it balloons into a large amount of money. 
	 Freedom of employment. You no longer have to work within the constraints of the government or public service. You are free to pursue study or work opportunities as you wish. 
 

  Disadvantages  

 
	 Sometimes things don’t go as planned. You might hit a financial roadblock that forces you to withdraw from your EPF fund. An example of this is a medical emergency. 
	 It subtracts 11% of your base salary. 11% might not seem like much, but for people who live paycheck to paycheck, it can be a bitter pill to swallow. 
	 Annual dividend from EPF can decrease, depending on economic climate. 
 

 Making a comparison 

 Monthly funds 

 Assuming that you live until the mean life expectancy age in Malaysia, which is 76 years old. 

 
 Years to live off retirement fund (pension) = 76-55 = 21 years 
 

 To make a fair comparison, let’s subtract the gratuity amount of a pension scheme from the lump sum of EPF savings. 

 
 EPF at 55 years old - gratuity of pension at 55 years old = RM461,900 - RM176,400 = RM285,500 

 Stipend per month that EPF provides = RM285,500 / 21 years / 12 months = RM1,132.94/month 
 

 Even if we did not subtract the gratuity value, it would be: 

 
 RM461,900 / 21 years / 12 months = RM1,832.94/ month 
 

  It is far less than RM2,600/month from a pension scheme . 

 What if we invest all of EPF savings? 

 Say at the age of 55, you embark on another investment with better returns. We will assume 8%. You pile up all your savings into it. 

 Investment return x EPF savings = 8% x RM 461,900 = RM36,952/year or RM3,079.33/month. 

  It is more than what you’ll obtain from a pension.  However you’ll need to ensure that the second investment has better returns than EPF dividends. That in itself can sometimes be a challenge. 

 Conclusion 

 They both have their advantages and drawbacks. It seems like it is up to you to play it well, to ensure you can lead a comfortable life upon retirement. 

 However the main question of choosing either EPF or pension as retirement savings often boils down to your choice of employer. 

 Will you stay with the government sector for another 30+ years? You don’t want to end up with no retirement fund… No EPF or no pension. That’d be the worst. 

 If yes, go for the pension scheme. It is safe, guaranteed, and offers great peace of mind in your golden years. 

 However, with EPF, you are free to take up opportunities that come your way. Countries like Saudi Arabia, Singapore, and Australia are actively seeking out Malaysian nurses with extremely attractive pay. Opportunities for post-graduate education are more limited in the government sector; if in private, you get to choose when you want to do it. You can also fund it with your EPF savings, something you can’t do on a pension. 

 Choose the freedom of choice. Search for high-paying nursing jobs, and overseas jobs on MIMS Career. Browse, save, and apply for nursing jobs, all in one-click. Take the opportunity for higher pay and better work locations. Our pages are all mobile-responsive, allowing you to take that leap for a better job whenever, wherever you are. All our job postings are heavily screened to prevent scams and mistrustful behavior. 
   

 
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 As incidences of chronic kidney disease and other related renal issues continue to rise, the need for adequately trained nurses in those fields continue to grow. Similar conditions are seen in various parts of the world. In 1999, the incidence of patients with kidney conditions requiring long-term care is 340,261. In 2010 it is over 600,000. 

 The diagnosis of renal conditions can be done with a primary care doctor. However, treatment and care of those patients require an understanding of risks, comorbid conditions, complications, and probabilities for loss of kidneys by both physicians and nurses. 

 For nurses, a post-basic renal course can open the doors to working in this area which is sorely lacking in manpower. Here are the reasons why you should consider pursuing a renal post-basic certification. 

 From bedside to business 

 There are a lot of CKD (chronic kidney disease) clinics opening up. Having a renal certification enables you to work at these clinics as your training is aligned with what they have to offer their patients. 

  Pusat Hemodialisis Mawar  is one of them. They are the largest private charity haemodialysis organization in the country. They have 13 centres spread throughout the country. 

 A short search on Google Maps also reveals a lot of haemodialysis centres in Klang Valley. 

 Being a nurse at institutions like those will train your patient management skills as you run the day-to-day administrative tasks in parallel with your nursing duties. 

 Better work setting 

 You’ll have a less erratic schedule than your peers. Dialysis patients require a regular timing on their treatment. Your shifts would be on more regular hours. A more fixed routine can be better for your health and well-being. 

 Better pay 

  On average, renal nurses with post basic certification get about 10% more pay.  

 Hospital dialysis nurses may be offered more pay, but they may also be required for emergency dialysis treatments, making their schedule less average than others in their field of focus. 

 Adjustable pace 

 You can choose to work in smaller dialysis centres for slower pace, or larger nephrology units in hospitals if you wish for a faster paced working environment. Unlike other specialties, you have a choice to work in the kind of environment that suits your working style. 

 Rapid changes in the field 

 Technological advances in the renal treatment field progresses at a rapid pace. Previously, it was slow. Kidney diseases were complex and difficult to study. Therefore treatments were vaguely ineffective. 

 The 21st century brought in upgraded transplantation technologies with breakthroughs in biocompatible materials. 

 As a renal nurse, you will handle the care of post-transplant patients. The tasks and how you perform your duties to these patients have a high probability of changing with the frenetic pace of research. 

 High Demand 

 Renal nurses have good experience in interpreting telemetric data. This makes them efficient at being support units in surgical wards to ensure successful procedures. 

 Dialysis is expensive, costly, and there’re not enough facilities and manpower in public and private hospitals. 

 Conclusion 

 Pursuing a renal post-basic certification is a solid pathway to consider. Nurses with this certification are more in demand, have better pay, and all the listed advantages above. For people who like clinical challenges, treading this path is for you. 

 Already have a post-basic in renal care? Head over to MIMS Career to search and apply for renal care jobs in your area. Just signup and experience our convenient 1-click application process. It’s fast, safe, and easy. MIMS Career also allows you to search in our huge database of employers seeking new staff. You can also save potential jobs for later viewing, and create your own personalized job alert.

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 Emergency Nursing 

 Emergency medicine, formerly known in some countries as accident and emergency medicine (A&E), is the medical specialty involving care for  undifferentiated and unscheduled patients with illnesses or injuries requiring immediate medical attention.  

 Overview 

 As first-line providers, emergency nurses and doctors are responsible for: 

 
	 initiating investigations and interventions to diagnose and/or treat patients in the acute phase 
	 coordinating care with doctors from other specialties 
	 making decisions regarding a patient’s need for hospital admission, observation, or discharge. 
 

 Emergency nurses generally practice in hospital emergency departments, wards, units or intensive care units. They may also be working at pre-hospital settings via emergency medical services, such as in the event of a calamity like a road accident. Moreover, emergency nurses also may work in primary care, such as urgent care clinics. 

 History 

 During the 18th century the French Revolution brought upon the development of the ambulance. After seeing the speed with which the carriages f the French flying artillery maneuvered across the battlefields, French military surgeon Dominique Jean Larrey applied the idea for rapid transport of wounded soldiers to a central place where healthcare was accessible. 

 Emergency medicine and nursing is a relatively new field. It was only in 1979 that a vote by the American Board of Medical Specialties that emergency medicine became a recognized medical specialty in the United States. Other countries followed suit soon thereafter. 

 Scope of Work 

 Emergency nursing is a specialization based on the knowledge and skills for the prevention, diagnosis and management of acute and urgent aspects of illness and injury affecting patients of all age groups with a full spectrum of undifferentiated physical and behavioral disorders. 

 It further encompasses an understanding of the development of pre-hospital and in-hospital emergency medical systems and the skills necessary for this development. 

 Common Tasks 

 
	 Triaging of patients 
	 Suture complex lacerations 
	 reduce a fractured bone or dislocated joint 
	 treat a heart attack 
	 manage strokes 
	 stop severe nosebleeds 
	 placing a chest tube 
	 conducting emergency tracheostomy 
 

 Work location 

 Emergency nurses are tasked to provide the acute care of internal medical and surgical conditions. In many emergency departments, nurses are tasked with seeing an alarmingly large number of patients, treating their illnesses and arranging their next steps. 

 Training 

 There are a variety of models for emergency nursing training across the globe. In some countries the emergency nurse rides in the ambulance to and fro the scene of emergency. This is done to provide stabilizing care to the affected patient. 

 Nurses in emergency departments require a broad field of knowledge and advanced procedural skills of many nursing fields. They must know how to: 

 
	 Resuscitate a patient 
	 Carry out surgical procedures 
	 provide cardiac life support 
	 Manage patients’ airways 
 

 Specialization for emergency nursing often happens after a post-basic certification proceeding three years of service as a registered nurse. 

 Required skillset 

 Emergency nurses require an extensive amount of cool-headedness to handle the oncoming onslaught of daily tasks that present themselves. A great number of emergency ward cases are urgent and time-sensitive in nature, therefore the nurse needs to exercise great caution and patient, while being curt and efficient at the same time. 

 Good teamworking skills is essential. The role of an emergency nurse also involves proper triaging of patients into in- or out-patient services, and work with various specialists or fields to determine the best course of action following prognosis. A positive, proactive, and supportive nurse is beneficial in any emergency setting. 

 Clear communication skills are required in order to convey the correct information to emergency dispatchers or hospital emergency personnel. Failure in conveying correct medical info will prove to be disastrous for the patient, incur financial losses, and increase chances of litigation due to malpractice. 

 Career opportunities 

 Emergency nurses can work in a wide variety of settings, and they include: 

 
	 First aid volunteers 
	 Emergency medical services (BOMBA, paramedics) 
	 paediatric emergency medicine 
	 rescue squads 
	 emergency medical technician 
	 traumatology 
 

 It is not uncommon for nurses to leave clinical work in order to focus on research, especially at the post-graduate levels of study. 

 Search for high-paying nursing jobs on  MIMS Career . Browse, save, and apply for nursing jobs, all in one-click. Take the opportunity for higher pay and better work locations. Our pages are all mobile-responsive, allowing you to take that leap for a better job whenever, wherever you are. All our job postings are  heavily screened to prevent scams and mistrustful behavior.  
   

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 A common question asked to academic counselors by prospective nursing students is: “So how’s the life of a nurse? What kind of hours to they work?” 

 It depends. It really depends on your location, academic qualifications, experience, country of practice, working environment… Really, I could make a long list but then the article would be way too long. 

 So our team at MIMS Career has sifted through the working hours of a lot of different types of nurses, so you can have an idea of what kind of career choices you’d have to make to go towards that kind of life. We’ve categorized it in five parts: a little, a bit, normal, a bit more, and a lot. 



 A little (3-5 hours a day) 

 Part-time nurse practitioners 

 These nurses mostly work doing house calls, or are doing contract jobs with non-medical institutions like schools or companies. Their employers do not require their presence most of the time, so as little as 3-5 hours per work session is pretty common. Part-time nurse practitioners usually have another job other than their nursing one. 

  Find out how to become a part-time nurse practitioner in our in-depth nursing career advancement guide HERE.  

 A bit (5-8 hours a day) 

 Locum nurses 

 Locum nurses work part time shifts in clinics or hospitals or other medical-related institutions. They are not on the payroll of the institution they work with; as they are only meant to supplement the institution’s own workforce. On average a locum nurse’s shift is about 5-8 hours. 

 It is more common to see nurses doing locum jobs to supplant their monthly income, but nurses who exclusively do locum jobs exist, albeit rare.  

  Find out part-time locum jobs for nurses on our career portal HERE.  

 Normal (8-10 hours a day) 

 Nurse instructors, academicians, dialysis nurses 

 These nurses work office hours. This is as normal as it gets. Dialysis centers and nursing schools all have regular, fixed schedules that don’t demand anything more than the usual office workday. 

 Same goes for those who work in nursing schools as teachers, trainers, or professors.  You can find out what it takes to be an academician in the nursing world in our article about lifelong learning HERE.  

 These kinds of nurses don’t normally work weekends, and their schedules are mostly the same and predictable. 

 A bit more (10-14 hours a day) 

 Those involved in direct patient care, like emergency room nurses 

 Most of the time, when nurses at the ER say they work a 12-hour shift from 7am to 7pm, they almost always never get to get out on time. There’s always something to do, someone else to cover, or some loose ends to tie up. 

 This is made even worse by working in hospitals with a shortage of staff. Nurses would be brought in to do things that are not in their job scope, because they can do those tasks. But people who are not nurses do not do nursing tasks because they cannot do those tasks. How many times have you been to an ER, and see a nurse doing clerical work at the front desk because the hospital doesn’t have a secretary or clerk? 



 A lot (14-24 hours a day) 



 Paediatric intensive care, intensive care, surgical, labor and delivery. 

 It is very common to see nurses doing double shifts in these wards. Their shifts might be 12 hours, but are sometimes to do two of those shifts back-to-back to reduce shift handovers, staffing overlap, and reduce costs. 

 Moreover, the type of work that this category of nurses do are a bit on the lengthier side. Surgeries can go up to 24 hours, including perioperative care. Intensive care can be very demanding as patients hover around critical states. 

 There is a variety of workloads for nurses. Each type of work suits different people who prioritize different things. With MIMS Career you have the opportunity of applying with ease to the jobs that you want to go into. Signup and apply with our easy, 1-click application process. Browse for jobs in Malaysia, Singapore, Philippines and Indonesia. Save jobs for later if you’re still on the fence. Also, you can opt for job alerts if nothing fancies you. 

  Signup and apply today! It’s fast, secure, and free.

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 How do we define a great nurse? Is it one that fully accomplishes his/her tasks? Completes her shifts well without any issues? 

 Great nurses are those who alleviate suffering and heal the body, mind, and soul. 



 Compassion 

 Compassion is the feeling of concern and sympathy for others. 

 The word compassion literally means to “suffer together.” It arises when a person sees another suffering, and feels a deep desire to relieve the said suffering. It is a central tenet of nursing; the very mature of the work originates from the compassion of individuals to relieve suffering and pain. 

 A compassionate nurse will always do what is right for her patients. In times of fatigue, tiredness, or exhaustion, compassion for that patient will drive this nurse to trudge onwards and do her job. 

  On developing compassion:  

 
 Make it a daily practice: Think about it in the morning during rounds. At night during late shifts. When you talk to patients. It is a simple philosophy of kindness. 
 If you’re finding it hard to develop compassion in your nursing life, remind yourself that everyone you meet is seeking happiness, avoiding suffering, has lost something, and is learning about what it means to be human. 
 Think about a person you know who’s recently suffering. Imagine if the suffering happened to you. Now imagine if there is another person who realizes your situation and is trying her very best to make you feel better. You would appreciate that a lot. 
 This helps you develop the feeling of wanting to relieve others’ suffering, which is the definition of compassion. 
 

 Compassion has many benefits: it has been proven that compassionate people produce 23% less cortisol, the “stress” hormone. 

 Empathy: 

 The ability to understand and share the feelings of another. 

 Understanding the feelings of patients is crucial to their recovery. 

 It does not mean you completely understand what they are going through. It also does not mean you agree with everything they are feeling. 

 It means that you are willing to make a voluntary effort to listen to them and understand their challenges. 

 It is shown that patients are more receptive to treatments when they feel that their caregivers understand their situation. 

  On developing empathy:  

 
 It needs to be done without judgement. 
 Everyone has a different set of values. Two similar patients can have completely different challenges. 
 Understand what they are fighting against, and what they are fearful of. Use it to better develop a relationship with your patient, so he/she may continue to recover holistically. 
 



 Selflessness 

 The ability to think less about ourselves, and more about other people. Nurses need this trait, mostly for their own benefit over the patient’s. 

 Being selfless means to give to others at the expense of their own selves. By being selfless, it makes working the stressful nursing life a lot better. 

 Some nurses miss their lunches just to hold their patient’s hand. Some stay up the night to make sure their patient manages to live through it. 

 The reason why these kind of nurses are great is that they would do it all over again. For many more years to come. They also have to. Selflessness prevents these nurses from burning out on their work by caring for others more. 

  On developing selflessness:  

 
 Take pleasure in the happiness of your patients. 
 Don’t hurt another person for the sake of hurting them. 
 Watch your selfish thoughts; like when a patient irritates you, threatens you, you get the idea. That kind of thinking gets in the way of compassion as well. 
 

  Good communicator  

 Not only will you be needing to administer IVs, triage patients in the ER, or carry out CPR, you will also need to be dealing with your patients as humans. 

 There are instances where you will have to help patients and their relatives to understand their medical situation, in a comprehensible way. 

 Moreover, you will need to deal with your superiors, and sometimes you might not agree with what they would have you do. Being a solid communicator allows you to express those feelings of disagreement, and come to a favorable conclusion. 

 If deciding to go into teaching, being a great communicator is essential that you can impart your knowledge onto junior nurses effectively. 

  On developing communication skills:  

 
 Practice practice practice. Try to be as understandable as possible. It helps to realize what kind of patient or relative you’re talking to, their proficiency in the language you speak and their terminologies. 
 Some states of malaysia have a different colloquial grammar compared to the standard Bahasa. It helps to understand these nuances in language. Mirror their way of speaking and you’ll come off as more approachable. 
 Never EVER condescend someone else for not understanding what you were trying to tell them. More often than not it is the inability of the speaker to explain, not the inability of the listener to understand. 
 

  Possess mental fortitude  

 Some days are pleasant. Some are rewarding. 

 But some are difficult. Some are downright devastating, like when you lose a patient you cared for. 

 It is important not to let these things mentally incapacitate you, and compromise your ability to care for your patients. 

 It is okay to feel sad, angry, frustrated, or even shattered. We are all human. 

 Great nurses have the mental fortitude to weather these types of events. It might not be easy, but they still return to practise their art of healing. 

  On developing mental fortitude:  

 
 Identify the obstacle in your path. Is it a difficult patient? An angry relative? Death? 
 Understand how your emotions are making you react. Are you upset? Why? 
 Know that the obstacle can sometimes be the way. A difficult patient can teach you patience. An angry relative can teach you to deal with irrational people with stride. Death can teach you to be compassionate of other people’s loss. 
 

 Focus on making the obstacle that’s disturbing you. Ask yourself, “If I can’t solve this for myself, how can I make this better for othe people?” 



 Calm under pressure 

 Great nurses remain calm and composed under great duress. 

 Diamonds are forged under high pressure. Great nurses too, are like that; the do not cave under the load, they emerge stronger and better. 

 Being calm under pressure-filled situations allows you to perceive problems with better accuracy. It leads to better decision making, which can mean life or death for your patients. 

 Remain calm, and you will make better sense of things around you. 

  On developing mental calm:  

 
 The events that we see as negative all have a positive benefit that we can act on. A computer glitch that destroys your work in the hospital is now an opportunity to become two times better at your job because you’re going to do it twice. 
 Having a terrible supervisor in the wards is now an opportunity to learn from his/her faults while you fill up your resume and look for better opportunities elsewhere.  
Being mentally calm is seeing through the negative, past its underside and through to the positive. 
 



 Lifelong learner 

 A carpenter is only as good as the tools he is given. 

 Same thing applies to a nurse. However, in this case, the tools to a nurse are her knowledge and skillset. 

 A diverse skillset will make you valuable at a lot of situations. 

 A deep understanding of a certain skillset will make you highly valued at that field. 

 Whatever it is, learning new things and constantly studying to make yourself better is always a good idea. 

  On developing lifelong learning skills:  

 
 Develop a passion for the latest advancements in nursing policy, technology, and laws. The changes in those areas will ultimately affect the future of your work. 
 Have a career plan, and work towards getting the skills, certifications, or knowledge that you need to move on to the next stage of your career. 
 Follow great medical podcasts to listen to on your commute. 
 Subscribe to nursing-related journals and publications, and make it a point to read in your spare time. 
 



 Conclusion 

 It is said that in times that require greatness,  we do not rise to the occasion but we fall back on our training.  These habits may not be in you, but with deliberate and constant practice, you can cultivate these, and continue on your path of becoming not only a good nurse, but a great one. 

 Great nurses are always on the lookout for new, exciting, and better opportunities to grow their career. Find out your next employment with MIMS Career, a fast, secure, and convenient portal to connect you to top-class healthcare employers in MY, SG, ID, and PH.

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