Think About These 5 Things Before You Decide On A Specialization

Now that you’re a registered nurse, what’s next? You’ve completed nursing school, gone on to work a few years and have gained experience in some wards. You decide that you want to pursue a specialization, for their multiple career growth benefits. Or maybe it’s for the higher salary that you have the potential to earn as a specialized nurse.

But hold your horses. While the benefits can be very enticing, choosing a specialization demands time, energy, and finances that you must be willing to sacrifice for a set period of time. You might not even see immediate benefits; they might come later in your career.

Still interested? Good. The nation needs more nurses like you. Ambitious nurses who are passionate about developing themselves and striving towards self-improvement. Here are five things your should consider before choosing your nursing specialty.

1. What Is Your Motivation To Pursue This Specialty?

What do you want to achieve by becoming a renal nurse? A perioperative nurse? A geriatric nurse?

You need to know what is exactly the reason for your interest in the specialty field of your choice. You want to help others? Is money a motivating factor? These are all acceptable reasons. If you are thinking of pursuing a specialization because of a family member or friend’s influence, that is fine, as long as your goals and objectives are in line with theirs.

Ultimately you are the one who has to go through and live with the decision. Knowing what motivates you will help you stay focused and succeed later, even through trying times.

2. How Are You Going to Obtain the Education and Training Needed for Your Specialization?

You should research a bit about the diplomas, post-basic certifications, degrees, and training courses that are required for the specialty you wish to take.

You can read up our guide to career advancement for nurses here.

Being a high-level nurse is a remarkable investment of money and time. It would be wise for you to think out how to pay for your education, and balance doing that with completing the required coursework.

If you have only a diploma in nursing and need to obtain your BSN degree from an expensive institution, a bit of planning ahead can help you save up for tuition fees. Some universities offer financial assistance that you can take advantage of.

Read here for our article on how to increase your income as a nurse. Every little increase in salary helps over time. It could mean the difference in you being able to take that course next year, or in two more years.

3. Does This Specialization Fit Your Strengths And Personality?

Not good around kids? Finding it hard to connect with younger patients? Then don’t take up paediatric nursing.

Are you a high-energy, challenge-seeking nurse that likes difficult situations? Or do you love to be in a more stable setting, working one day at a time, employing your full focus on things that matter? Are you an introvert? Extrovert?

Each specialization requires different skillsets and personality traits. Consider this well and evaluate how the work would mesh with your personality.

4. How Will This Impact Your Family And Personal Life?

Think wisely and carefully about this. Consider how your family might be affected if you have to work nights, weekends, or on call. Some courses are done at night after work.

Some employers do not grant study leave to their nurses. Think about how your family might be financially impacted if you were to quit your current job in order to study.

It is imperative you give it some thought now before you make the leap into your specialization.

5. Where Do You Want To Work?

Based on your working experiences, where do you think you’d like to work? Most importantly, which type of environment would you be most comfortable, and most successful?

If working conditions at hospitals are too hectic and large, then specializing as a cardiac nurse in cardiology would not be a good idea. Maybe you’d like to work more regular hours, in a small nursing center. Specializing in nephrology to become a renal/dialysis nurse would be a great idea. Some would also opt to practice nursing independently, doing house calls. A specialization in home care would be the best course of action.

Do you want to work near where you live? Or are you willing to move to another city for better prospects? Don’t limit yourself! Nurses are still needed at places you wouldn’t normally think of, like military bases or schools.

To get an idea of what nursing jobs are available in the area you wish to work in, check out our job portal, MIMS Career. Search for nursing jobs across Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia and the Philippines. New jobs and vacancies are being updated every day. Browse through our extensive database, and apply with our convenient 1-click process.



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  This week we managed to get in touch with Nejlika (pronounced neh-lika) Confinement Care Centre. They provide confinement services for mothers with newborn babies. Established in 2014, Nejlika is committed to providing the best and safest form of care for the newborns’ first 28 days, and for the mothers’ recoveries.  

  What really got us interested with Nejlika was their practice in bringing confinement, which is a traditional concept in post-natal care, into modern times by using scientific methods of observation and critical analysis.  

  Nejlika is currently hiring for post-natal care nurses.  See the job posting page here for more details .  

 
  Can you describe what your institution provides?  

 Nejlika Confinement Centre provides confinement care for post-natal mothers and newborn babies. 

 We assess the health conditions of the mother and baby, monitoring them daily. We provide professional and scientific feeding, nursing care, and early intellectual development for the baby. For the mother we have uniquely customized meals that are both healthy and delicious. These efforts do a lot to promote healing. 

  How did this place come about?  

 We first saw that there was a market demand for confinement centers in the Klang Valley. We saw that in places like Penang or Johor there are already a substantial amount. But a lot of them are sort of like household business. They hire non-medical professionals for treatment. So we set up this place in 2014. 

 The founders of this centre are all from the healthcare industry. The first 28 days of a newborn will be the most critical stage of a baby’s life. Although confinement is a traditional concept of post-natal care, we bring in present, scientific methods to bring this practice to modern times. 

 New parents or non-professionals are not able to take care of the newborn baby and mother as well as trained nurses and physicians. We aim to provide the best quality service, comfortable living environment, nutritious meals and warm family surroundings to help both the mother and newborn navigate this crucial period of their lives. 

  I saw on your Facebook you have many customers; even non-malaysians. What do you do to attract people to come here?  

 To be honest we don’t really go out to promote the centre. So far it’s all been through word of mouth, maybe a bit of Facebook postings. 

  How do you convince someone who is pregnant to use your services, rather than carry out traditional confinement at home?  

 Usually after the customer knows about us, they will call to inquire. This is before they give birth. So we arrange a 1-to-1 appointment with them. So during this appointment period we explain to them what is the service that we provide, and the philosophy behind our service. 

 Over here, our center advocates breast-feeding, and we have a certified infant massage instructor. We promote early brain development for the baby through the infant massages. 

  What makes you different from the other confinement centres?  

 First of all we are one of the pioneers here, so we are very experienced in specialized confinement care. Also, one of our founders is the only person in Malaysia with twin certificates specialized in confinement care from Taiwan. She purposely went to Taiwan to obtain this certification, not just once but twice. 

 At the same time we engage the service of chinese traditional medicine practitioners. Although we advocate scientific and modern confinement care, we also incorporate the traditional care to bring a well-rounded care to the mother and baby. 

 In Traditional Chinese Medicine, we believe the body constitution of humans can be divided into nine types. Different type of body constitution will require different forms of nutrition or medication. Our chef will prepare the personalized herbal tonic soup for each post-natal mother upon advice by our chinese medicine practitioner for greater rejuvenation.  

 Not many other confinement care provide this service. 

  Can we talk about the food you serve here? They look great! Do you have an in-house cook?  

 We have a special cook. We put out an ad in the newspaper, and managed to get one with training for confinement cooking. We advocate healthy and nourishing foods that aids the mothers’ recovery. 

 Everything that comes into contact with the mothers and babies have to be clean, healthy, and promote recovery. This includes the furniture, beds, food, even the air in the centre as well. 

  How many staff members do you now have?  

 We have 10 nurses, 2 maids, 2 chefs and 1 assistant to help us run the operation. 

 As for now, there are not many customers. It is a bit of a low season. Usually there are more births from late July-early August til the end of the year. 

  To staff: What do you do to make your staff happy and enjoy working here?  

 We feel happy because we enjoy what we do. It’s a slower pace than hospitals, and we love to look after babies. 

  What’s the hiring process like? Who decides on the hire?  

 Advertising on newspaper, platforms online, recommendations of current nurses. More so on the EQ. 

 We advertise in the newspapers, online platforms such as MIMS Career, and word of mouth. Very often we get new hires based on the recommendations of nurses currently working here. 

  What kind of people do you look for when you hire staff?  

 We need staff who are passionate about care for post-natal mothers and infant babies. Post-partum depression is very real, so nurses here have to be very aware of the telltale signs of it. They need to have high EQ to be able to console and advise mothers suffering through post-partum depression and help guide them out of it. 

 We also look out for staff who have high patience levels. Dealing with babies can sometimes prove to be a frustrating task. 

  What cool pieces of technology do you have in this centre?  

 We have a  bilirubinometer ; it is a device that measures the level of bilirubin in the babies to detect jaundice. If jaundice is determined to be present in the baby, we bring in a “jaundice phototherapy” machine and treat the infant until bilirubin levels drop to normal levels. We are the first confinement centre to provide this service. It avoids the hassle of going to the hospital, which can be very strenuous on both mother and newborn. 

 Also, to really avoid cross-contaminations we sterilize the rooms with a  UV light emitter . UV light destroys germs and bacteria. 

 On the other side of the  light spectrum , we use Infrared light emitters to promote healing of mothers’ wounds, especially ones after C-sections. 

 Finally, we have a baby swimming pool! Therapy done in the pool promotes brain development. 

  What does the future look like for Nejlika Confinement Care Centre?  

 Obviously we want to expand. That is the only way a business can grow. 

 We have moved from single storey to double storey within three years. We’re looking to set up branches in other places, in order to provide service to customers not within reach of us right now.

Institution Highlight: Nejlika Confinement Centre

This week we managed to get in touch with Nejlika (pronounced neh-lika) Confinement Care Centre. They provide confinement services for mothers with newborn babies. Established in 2014, Nejlika is committed to providing the best and safest form...

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 A close relative of mine is a young nurse. Two years ago she started taking care of this nice lady who was partially paralysed; her breathing muscles would no longer function autonomously, hence a tracheostomy was done so she could breathe. The condition left her bed-ridden on bad days, and wheel-chair bound on good ones. 

 She cared for the lady to the best of her abilities, for about 18 months. One day the lady started feeling cold. She was sweating and shivering at the same time. She went unconscious, and had five cardiac arrests within 36 hours. 

 After unsuccessfully trying to stabilize her blood pressure, she died of heart failure. The young nurse was devastated. It wasn’t her own mother, but it might as well seemed like it. It was her first patient death while working as a nurse. It affected her so much she found it difficult to work for the next week. 

 This experience is shared by many nurses in the country. How nurses bond with their patients depends on circumstances and the length of time they provided care to them. A strong bond between patient and nurse is essential to effective nursing, but when death happens, it can deal a very significant blow. 

 The first death of your patient can massively impact you as a nurse. So will subsequent ones. 

 It is extremely important that this doesn’t mentally compromise your ability to do your work. 

 How can you, as a nurse, deal with it? 

 1. It’s okay to feel emotions. Embrace it fully. 

 You are human. You are in a compassionate profession: the very basis of nursing started on the principle to relieve pain, assuage suffering, and provide help to those of ailing health. 

 It is okay to feel overwhelmed at first, especially when you have cared for the patient for so long. 

 Empathy is good for your job, it makes you a better nurse, but it makes loss more painful. 

 Allow yourself some time to feel, and understand your emotions. 

 Your line of work is to care for people, the noblest of all human traits. Your grief on the death of your patient means that you have done your job. 

 2. Try to accept the death happened. 

 Some wards have it harder than others for this. 

 A geriatric ward would have the oldest, most needy patients. Conducting CPR on these patients can be cruel, especially if you or your team are not willing to “let go” of the patient. 

 However, death in these parts of the hospital would be a routine part of the day. It is wise to accept it, so you can continue giving out the best care to the other still-living patients without letting it affect the quality of your work. 

 Accept their deaths, and the fact that you have done all you could to alleviate their suffering. Know that you have done your best to keep them comfortable and retain their dignity. 

 3. Remain in control and neutral if breaking the news to the family. Don’t add to the problem. 

 It is okay to share your emotions with the patient’s loved ones. 

 Respect the family; if they do not wish you to partake in their grief, then kindly leave them alone. They have also gone through much, just like you. 

 Some relatives will blame the doctor/nurse for causing the death. Don’t take this to heart. The Kubler-Ross model of grief lays out five stages, and anger is one of them. 
Find your own ways to vent, either through support groups, family, or colleagues. 

 4. Talk about it. Don’t bottle it in. 

 One of the best things about being in the nursing workforce is that you’re surrounded by people who have gone through similar experiences too. 

 Death is prevalent amongst healthcare professions, and sometimes just talking to a senior can help a lot. 

 Find someone you’re comfortable with. It can be a senior nurse, a matron, or even your other colleagues in the ward. 

 Ask them how they managed to overcome such periods of distress. Pour out whatever you’re feeling to them; it is very likely that they have felt everything you are feeling right now. 

 Talking about it helps you make sense of what you’re feeling. By articulating it into words, you can pinpoint exactly what’s bothering you, and help you to come to terms. 

 5. Realize that these things happen. 

 Things happen. Death is part and parcel of the life in a hospital. Some areas will be more prone to dealing with death than others, like the ER, surgical ward, the ICU. 
You might find yourself poring over the moments that led up to the death in your mind, going over what you could have done better, what you could have done differently. 

 This leads to a general feeling of guilt. This can be very destructive to your well-being, and can affect the performance of your work to other patient who also need your care. This is not a good coping mechanism if it jeopardizes the health of your other patients. 

 6. Believe that you are making a difference. 

 The death of a patient does not equal to failure. 

 How you deal with the patient’s relatives is an extension of how you treated their late relative. 

 For all the grief that you may be feeling right now, the patient’s family has it harder. 

 Showing that you cared provides a monumental difference, and leads the family to a safer path of acceptance. 

 Conclusion 

 The trait that sets humans apart from other species is our ability to empathize for our fellow brethren. 

 Other fauna have demonstrated this to a certain degree, but only humans have been able to take it to their very core, make it into their reason to live, and deliver it back to their community. 

 Nursing is more than just facts or skills or the amount of certifications that you can obtain to move your career. It is founded on empathy; the ability to understand others’ suffering and pain. 

 During times when you feel overwhelmed or devastated by the loss of your patient, stand firm and be proud of who you are, because nurses do things that not many will have the capacity to accomplish. 

 You will find your way to deal with it as you become more experienced, and become better at learning what is the best way to help families cope with grief over time. 

 Steel your heart, adjust that uniform, and carry on providing the best that you can give to your other patients.

How to Cope with Death and Loss, as A Nurse

A close relative of mine is a young nurse. Two years ago she started taking care of this nice lady who was partially paralysed; her breathing muscles would no longer function autonomously, hence a tracheostomy was done so she could breathe. The...

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	  See if the offer is too good to be true  
	  There is a fee to be paid to "process" your employment  
	  You get the job right away  
	  Unprofessional job interviews  
 

 Job scams 

 In 2013, a South African registered nurse was approached by a man outside the hospital she worked in. The 25-year old man was a recruitment agent for the  KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) Department of Health . He offered her a job at another institution, for better pay and work hours. 

 The nurse saw this as a great opportunity. She accepted it, and he produced a contract and offered her the job.  Then he requested USD220 in cash for the job.  

 Thankfully, the nurse grew suspicious, and realized she was being scammed. She immediately alerted hospital staff who arrested the man. 

   

 Grey's Hospital, where the incident happened. 

 That could have ended a lot worse. Luckily in that nurse's case, she was able to spot the scam job offer. It is hoped that this post can help you to spot these harmful acts and avoid costing you your precious time, money, and dignity. Scammers know that finding a job can be tough, and they trick people by advertising where real employers do. 

 Scams are endlessly creative! This list might not encompass all of them, but it will help you in detecting these harmful job scams. 

 
 1. See If The Offer Is Too Good To Be True 

 If it seems like you’ve landed yourself the best offer in the world,  DON’T . The hiring managers will say something to you like: 

 
 You can earn as much as you want, there is no upper limit on your salary. You decide what you earn. You can earn USD5,000 in one week by working at home! 
 

 Run away as fast as you can. These scams like to prey on those desperate for a new job. They take advantage of your desperation by having you excited of their offer. Once they’ve gotten you on their hook, those “employers” can start to demand money, information, and time, just to get your application moving. 

  Watch out for:  

 
	 Really high pay with low amount of working hours 
	 Ability to work anywhere, anytime 
	 Really shady phrases, like “ Drive the sports car you’ve ever wanted after only a few months’ work! ” or " Earn USD3000 by only working FOUR HOURS a week! " 
	 The person contacting you is the President or CEO or other executive level staff. Most of the time, the highest-ranking person contacting you for a job offer is some type of manager or human resources employee. 
 

 2. There is a fee to be paid to "process" your employment 

   

 If the hiring manager contacts you again and informs you that you have to pay [insert amount here] to complete your application, forget it. 

 You might see overseas job offers requiring you to pay a few hundred dollars to "process" your application. They'll claim it's to secure your employment. To sweeten the deal, some of them claim that you'll get back the money within days after you get in the company/institution. 

  Here are the most common ways job scams use to cheat your money, like:  

 
	 Buying their software 
	 Paying a fee to complete your application 
	 Sign up for some insurance program that deducts money from your account every month 
 

 Job scammers make all kinds of promises about your chances of employment, and an astounding amount of them require you to pay them for their services to employ you. It's important to note that the promise of a job is  not  the same thing as a job. If you have to pay for that promise, it's most definitely a scam. 

 3. You get the job right away 

 You get the job, without much interviewing, or even applying through anything. The "offer" gets sent to your inbox. They often mention that they got your email from Jobstreet, CareerBuilder, or LinkedIn. 

  Most of the time, these job offers are sent with emails that are similar to emails of legitimate employers. Be careful!  

 
 Imagine if a David Chen from  Ramsay Sime Darby  emailed you about a sweet job offer. If he really worked at RSD, his email would be something like david.c@simedarby.com. Watch out for david.c.simedarby@gmail.com, david.c@gmail.com, david.chen.HR.simedarby@yahoo.com, etc. 

 When in doubt, call up the company and ask for that employee! 
 

  A real company would want to talk to a candidate before hiring him or her.  

 4. Unprofessional job interviews 

   

 Look out for interviews online, such as over  Facebook Messenger . Worse still, are interviews using a software that the scammer asks you to install on you computer. You will risk having your computer infected with harmful malware that can  record what you type  ,  activate your webcam without notifying you , and  hold your personal information as ransom . 

 Look out for interviewers with bad grammar or spelling. If it doesn't seem like what a real professional company would say, don't trust it. 

 
 With some common sense, and a bit of suspicion, you can easily spot scam job offers. The rule of thumb is that if it looks too good to be true, sounds too good to be true, and seems to good to be true, then it's definitely not true. Also look out for shady characters and language. 

 As mentioned above, there is no limit to the creativity of these scam artists and their job offers. The tips mentioned above might cover  ALL  the scam job methods out there, but at least you'll be better prepared, and more aware that these things can happen. 

 As a healthcare-focused job portal site,  MIMS Career  takes the legitimacy of any employer and job posting  very seriously . We screen employers thoroughly, contacting them at various levels, to determine authenticity of said employers. Our  privacy policy  also dictates that we  never  share your personal information to unrelated third parties, nor do we sell them. 

 The next time you're in search of a job, apply through  MIMS Career . Sign up, fill in your details, and apply for job vacancies from top healthcare institutions in  Malaysia ,  Singapore ,  Indonesia , and the  Philippines  with one click. 

 Browse through our extensive database of job postings, updated daily. Our pages are mobile-responsive, so you can save jobs you're interested in on your desktop, and continue reading about it and apply later on your phone. 

 Can't find what you're looking for? Set a job alert, and we'll notify you once a job with your preferences is made available. Sign up now with  MIMS Career . It's fast, convenient, and secure. We do the hard work of verifying scam jobs so you won't have to. 
   

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4 Things To Know About Scam Job Offers

See if the offer is too good to be true There is a fee to be paid to "process" your employment You get the job right away Unprofessional job interviews Job scams In 2013, a South African...

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