How To Spot Job Offer Scams

  1. See if the offer is too good to be true
  2. There is a fee to be paid to "process" your employment
  3. You get the job right away
  4. Unprofessional job interviews

Job scams

In 2013, a South African registered nurse was approached by a man outside the hospital she worked in. The 25-year old man was a recruitment agent for the KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) Department of Health. He offered her a job at another institution, for better pay and work hours.

The nurse saw this as a great opportunity. She accepted it, and he produced a contract and offered her the job. Then he requested USD220 in cash for the job.

Thankfully, the nurse grew suspicious, and realized she was being scammed. She immediately alerted hospital staff who arrested the man.

Grey's Hospital, where the incident happened.

Grey's Hospital, where the incident happened.

That could have ended a lot worse. Luckily in that nurse's case, she was able to spot the scam job offer. It is hoped that this post can help you to spot these harmful acts and avoid costing you your precious time, money, and dignity. Scammers know that finding a job can be tough, and they trick people by advertising where real employers do.

Scams are endlessly creative! This list might not encompass all of them, but it will help you in detecting these harmful job scams.


1. See If The Offer Is Too Good To Be True

Wow! OMG!

If it seems like you’ve landed yourself the best offer in the world, DON’T. The hiring managers will say something to you like:

You can earn as much as you want, there is no upper limit on your salary. You decide what you earn. You can earn USD5,000 in one week by working at home!

Run away as fast as you can. These scams like to prey on those desperate for a new job. They take advantage of your desperation by having you excited of their offer. Once they’ve gotten you on their hook, those “employers” can start to demand money, information, and time, just to get your application moving.

Watch out for:

2. There is a fee to be paid to "process" your employment

insert image about money

If the hiring manager contacts you again and informs you that you have to pay [insert amount here] to complete your application, forget it.

You might see overseas job offers requiring you to pay a few hundred dollars to "process" your application. They'll claim it's to secure your employment. To sweeten the deal, some of them claim that you'll get back the money within days after you get in the company/institution.

Here are the most common ways job scams use to cheat your money, like:

Job scammers make all kinds of promises about your chances of employment, and an astounding amount of them require you to pay them for their services to employ you. It's important to note that the promise of a job is not the same thing as a job. If you have to pay for that promise, it's most definitely a scam.

3. You get the job right away

Get the job right away

You get the job, without much interviewing, or even applying through anything. The "offer" gets sent to your inbox. They often mention that they got your email from Jobstreet, CareerBuilder, or LinkedIn.

Most of the time, these job offers are sent with emails that are similar to emails of legitimate employers. Be careful!

Imagine if a David Chen from Ramsay Sime Darby emailed you about a sweet job offer. If he really worked at RSD, his email would be something like david.c@simedarby.com. Watch out for david.c.simedarby@gmail.com, david.c@gmail.com, david.chen.HR.simedarby@yahoo.com, etc.

When in doubt, call up the company and ask for that employee!

A real company would want to talk to a candidate before hiring him or her.

4. Unprofessional job interviews

unprofessional job interview

Look out for interviews online, such as over Facebook Messenger. Worse still, are interviews using a software that the scammer asks you to install on you computer. You will risk having your computer infected with harmful malware that can record what you type , activate your webcam without notifying you, and hold your personal information as ransom.

Look out for interviewers with bad grammar or spelling. If it doesn't seem like what a real professional company would say, don't trust it.


With some common sense, and a bit of suspicion, you can easily spot scam job offers. The rule of thumb is that if it looks too good to be true, sounds too good to be true, and seems to good to be true, then it's definitely not true. Also look out for shady characters and language.

As mentioned above, there is no limit to the creativity of these scam artists and their job offers. The tips mentioned above might cover ALL the scam job methods out there, but at least you'll be better prepared, and more aware that these things can happen.

As a healthcare-focused job portal site, MIMS Career takes the legitimacy of any employer and job posting very seriously. We screen employers thoroughly, contacting them at various levels, to determine authenticity of said employers. Our privacy policy also dictates that we never share your personal information to unrelated third parties, nor do we sell them.

The next time you're in search of a job, apply through MIMS Career. Sign up, fill in your details, and apply for job vacancies from top healthcare institutions in Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, and the Philippines with one click.

Browse through our extensive database of job postings, updated daily. Our pages are mobile-responsive, so you can save jobs you're interested in on your desktop, and continue reading about it and apply later on your phone.

Can't find what you're looking for? Set a job alert, and we'll notify you once a job with your preferences is made available. Sign up now with MIMS Career. It's fast, convenient, and secure. We do the hard work of verifying scam jobs so you won't have to.

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 A close relative of mine is a young nurse. Two years ago she started taking care of this nice lady who was partially paralysed; her breathing muscles would no longer function autonomously, hence a tracheostomy was done so she could breathe. The condition left her bed-ridden on bad days, and wheel-chair bound on good ones. 

 She cared for the lady to the best of her abilities, for about 18 months. One day the lady started feeling cold. She was sweating and shivering at the same time. She went unconscious, and had five cardiac arrests within 36 hours. 

 After unsuccessfully trying to stabilize her blood pressure, she died of heart failure. The young nurse was devastated. It wasn’t her own mother, but it might as well seemed like it. It was her first patient death while working as a nurse. It affected her so much she found it difficult to work for the next week. 

 This experience is shared by many nurses in the country. How nurses bond with their patients depends on circumstances and the length of time they provided care to them. A strong bond between patient and nurse is essential to effective nursing, but when death happens, it can deal a very significant blow. 

 The first death of your patient can massively impact you as a nurse. So will subsequent ones. 

 It is extremely important that this doesn’t mentally compromise your ability to do your work. 

 How can you, as a nurse, deal with it? 

 1. It’s okay to feel emotions. Embrace it fully. 

 You are human. You are in a compassionate profession: the very basis of nursing started on the principle to relieve pain, assuage suffering, and provide help to those of ailing health. 

 It is okay to feel overwhelmed at first, especially when you have cared for the patient for so long. 

 Empathy is good for your job, it makes you a better nurse, but it makes loss more painful. 

 Allow yourself some time to feel, and understand your emotions. 

 Your line of work is to care for people, the noblest of all human traits. Your grief on the death of your patient means that you have done your job. 

 2. Try to accept the death happened. 

 Some wards have it harder than others for this. 

 A geriatric ward would have the oldest, most needy patients. Conducting CPR on these patients can be cruel, especially if you or your team are not willing to “let go” of the patient. 

 However, death in these parts of the hospital would be a routine part of the day. It is wise to accept it, so you can continue giving out the best care to the other still-living patients without letting it affect the quality of your work. 

 Accept their deaths, and the fact that you have done all you could to alleviate their suffering. Know that you have done your best to keep them comfortable and retain their dignity. 

 3. Remain in control and neutral if breaking the news to the family. Don’t add to the problem. 

 It is okay to share your emotions with the patient’s loved ones. 

 Respect the family; if they do not wish you to partake in their grief, then kindly leave them alone. They have also gone through much, just like you. 

 Some relatives will blame the doctor/nurse for causing the death. Don’t take this to heart. The Kubler-Ross model of grief lays out five stages, and anger is one of them. 
Find your own ways to vent, either through support groups, family, or colleagues. 

 4. Talk about it. Don’t bottle it in. 

 One of the best things about being in the nursing workforce is that you’re surrounded by people who have gone through similar experiences too. 

 Death is prevalent amongst healthcare professions, and sometimes just talking to a senior can help a lot. 

 Find someone you’re comfortable with. It can be a senior nurse, a matron, or even your other colleagues in the ward. 

 Ask them how they managed to overcome such periods of distress. Pour out whatever you’re feeling to them; it is very likely that they have felt everything you are feeling right now. 

 Talking about it helps you make sense of what you’re feeling. By articulating it into words, you can pinpoint exactly what’s bothering you, and help you to come to terms. 

 5. Realize that these things happen. 

 Things happen. Death is part and parcel of the life in a hospital. Some areas will be more prone to dealing with death than others, like the ER, surgical ward, the ICU. 
You might find yourself poring over the moments that led up to the death in your mind, going over what you could have done better, what you could have done differently. 

 This leads to a general feeling of guilt. This can be very destructive to your well-being, and can affect the performance of your work to other patient who also need your care. This is not a good coping mechanism if it jeopardizes the health of your other patients. 

 6. Believe that you are making a difference. 

 The death of a patient does not equal to failure. 

 How you deal with the patient’s relatives is an extension of how you treated their late relative. 

 For all the grief that you may be feeling right now, the patient’s family has it harder. 

 Showing that you cared provides a monumental difference, and leads the family to a safer path of acceptance. 

 Conclusion 

 The trait that sets humans apart from other species is our ability to empathize for our fellow brethren. 

 Other fauna have demonstrated this to a certain degree, but only humans have been able to take it to their very core, make it into their reason to live, and deliver it back to their community. 

 Nursing is more than just facts or skills or the amount of certifications that you can obtain to move your career. It is founded on empathy; the ability to understand others’ suffering and pain. 

 During times when you feel overwhelmed or devastated by the loss of your patient, stand firm and be proud of who you are, because nurses do things that not many will have the capacity to accomplish. 

 You will find your way to deal with it as you become more experienced, and become better at learning what is the best way to help families cope with grief over time. 

 Steel your heart, adjust that uniform, and carry on providing the best that you can give to your other patients.

How to Cope with Death and Loss, as A Nurse

A close relative of mine is a young nurse. Two years ago she started taking care of this nice lady who was partially paralysed; her breathing muscles would no longer function autonomously, hence a tracheostomy was done so she could breathe. The...

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 1. Midwifery 

  What : Interested in obstetrics and gynaecology? Taking up a midwifery course can land you jobs in O&G offices, clinics, or hospitals. In O&G settings, emergencies can arise at any time, so expect some pretty hectic days. You can even open up your private practice as well. 

  How : A lot of teaching institutions offer midwifery courses in Malaysia. You can check out MAHSA, IMC, UKM, and others. Course duration takes about 1-2 years. 

  Why : Nurses with Midwifery skills can earn up to 33% more than normal registered nurses. Search high-paying Midwifery jobs now. 



 2. Administrative Skills 

  What : This is a part of nursing that not many will look at. With good administrative skills, you can take on behind-the-scenes roles and oversee the “business” aspect of nursing. You can review budgets, HR functions, management, and more. 

  How : Take up administrative tasks, or courses. A lot of universities and colleges offer full- and part-time programs that you can fit in your schedule. Otherwise, online courses work as well. You can find more here. 

  Why : Nurse Administrators earn about 30% more than unspecialized nurses. 



 3. Telemetry and Informatics 

  What : As global advances in electronics become more and more sophisticated, technology companies have been producing better instruments to help healthcare workers better understand their patients. Reading these instruments require skill, training, and critical thinking in order to use the data to make decisions on treatments. 

  How : You’d need a Masters in nursing, or computer science and its equivalents. This is an emerging field, so don’t expect it to be so widespread, but you will be in high demand and paid more. 

  Why : The salary ranges from USD58,088 to USD105,034. 



 4. A different language 

  What : The advantages are numerous. You can expose yourself to new settings. New people. Take more opportunities you wouldn’t have done without that third or fourth language. Right now Mandarin is very highly prized in this side of the world. 

 What about Arabic? There’s a huge market for nurses there. Knowing Arabic would create better patient-nurse relationship that’s beneficial to treatment. 

  How : Take up language classes! Learning centers are abundant. Online classes are available here as well. 

  Why : It opens a world of job opportunities, gives your brain a boost, and develop priceless intercultural relationships. 



 5. Use MIMS Career! 

  What : MIMS Career is an effective, one-stop application platform for nurses in Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia and Philippines. Signup today and enjoy our unique 1-click application process to countless high-paying nursing jobs. 

  How : Signup. Fill in your details and resume. Apply.  

  Why : Find high-paying nursing jobs in the comfort of your home, or wherever you are. Get connected with top healthcare employers in the country, for free, in a safe, secure manner.

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  source: Larm Rmah  

  1. Paediatrics  
 2. History  
 3. Key differences  
 4. Ethics  
 5. Training  
 6. Job scope  
 7. Required skills  
 8. Common Cases  
 9. Career Opportunities  

 Paediatrics 

 Paediatrics is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical of infants, children, and adolescents. The American Academy of Paediatrics recommends people be under paediatric care up to the age of 21. A medical practitioner who specializes in this area is known as a paediatrician. 

 The word paediatrics can be spelled as either  paediatrics , as per British English, or  pediatrics , as per the American counterpart. Both spellings are acceptable. 

 The word paediatrics comes from two Greek words: “ pais “, meaning children, and “ iaitros “, meaning “doctor” or “healer”. Paediatric nurses usually work in hospitals, assisting physicians in specialized subfields like  neonatology . 

 History 

 Paediatrics is considered to be a new subset of medicine today. Ancient Greek physicians like Hippocrates, Aristotle, Celsus, Soranus, and Galen understood the differences in growing organisms like children; as compared to fully-mature adults. Soranus, a Greek physician and gynaecologist from Ephesus (located in modern-day Turkey) has published  records dealing with neonatal paediatrics . 

   

  source: EIT Mental Health  

 Paediatrics as a specialized field of medicine continued to develop in the mid-19th century. The first generally accepted paediatric hospital is the L’Hopital des Enfants Malades, which literally translates from French as “The Hospital for Ill Children.” It opened in Paris in the month of June, 1802. It accepted patients up to the age of 15 years, and still continues to operate today. 

 Key Differences Between Adult and Paediatric Medicine 

 Maturation of the human body is paralleled by differences in body size. In other words, the smaller the infant, the more different the physiology of the said patient. The smaller body of an infant or a neonate (a baby) provides a greater concern to physicians or nurses in the paediatric ward. Congenital defects, genetic variance, and developmental issues adversely affect children more than adults. 

 Children, therefore, must not be treated as “a smaller version of adults.” 

 Nurses and physicians in the paediatric specialty must take into account the immature physiology of the infant or child when considering symptoms, prescribing medications, and diagnosing illnesses. 

 Ethics 

 Another major difference between adult and paediatric medicine, is that  children cannot make decisions for themselves . This is important enough to warrant its own subsection in this article. 

 The issues of guardianship, privacy, legal responsibility and informed consent must  always  be considered in every procedure. 

 
 … children cannot make decisions for themselves. 
 

 Rather than just treating the child, those working in paediatrics often have to treat the parents and the family. Adolescents are in their own legal class, depending on the country, and they have rights to their own health care decisions in certain circumstances. 

 Not only will a paediatric nurse or doctor take into account the desires of a child when considering treatment options, he or she will conform to the wishes of many people. This becomes especially  important when dealing with conditions of poor prognosis, and complicated or painful procedures.  

 Training 

 Courses are available to registered nurses who have completed a minimum number of service years. The number of years differ according to country. The qualifications range from advanced diplomas, to PhD research focusing on paediatric care. Many academicians forgo clinical practice in order to pursue research that will improve the quality of healthcare or bring about favourable policies to the care of children and adolescents. 

   

  source: paediatricemergencies.podbean.com  

 It is very common for paediatric nursing training to be comprised of  didactic  and clinical components covering the management and treatment of acute and complex child patients. 

 In Malaysia, paediatric training also comprises of management of sophisticated technology, providing nurses with the capability to offer quality care in a variety of situations. Training for disease prevention and recuperative treatment are also common modules in a paediatric nursing course. 

 Core modules of training would include  interpersonal skills and counselling ,  values and ethics ,  paediatric principles and practice ,  nursing of children with special needs ,  paediatric oncology , and some clinical practice. 

 Job scope and responsibilities 

 Typical activites may vary according to the role and work setting of the paediatric nurse. Children with special needs often require a different level of care compared to others. With that said, responsibilities include: 

 
	 assessment and critical reporting of patients 
	 preparing patients for pre- or post-op 
	 setting up drips, transfusions 
	 administering drugs and injections 
	 explaining procedures, treatments, to patients or guardians to acquire their consent to treatment 
	 support, comfort, and advise the child and family 
 

 Required skills 

 Children are sensitive, therefore tread lightly when giving care. Paediatric nurses need to display: 

 
	 respect towards the patients and their family’s decisions 
	 excellent communication skills 
	 be able to communicate on a level that the child would understand (if required) 
	 ability to deal with a range of patients at one time 
	 emotional resilience, and mentally strong to handle patients under difficult conditions 
	 compassion to others’ suffering 
 

 Common cases 

 Flat feet 

   

  source: smartlivingnetwork.com  

 Usually happens when the bar ossifies, about 8-12 years old. The tarsal area coalesces and causes rigid and painful flat feet. Operative treatment is not usually needed, unless severe. Usually managed non-operatively. 

 SUFE (Slipped Upper Femoral Epiphysis - also known as SCFE) 

   

  source: Raymond Liu, MD  

 This is a disease that afflicts adolescents (13-18 years old). The growth plate widens during growth spurt and some factors then predispose to slip. Adolescents who suffer from obesity, femoral neck retroversion, endocrinopathies, and trauma are particularly likely to be diagnosed with this. 

 Bradycardia 

   

  source: cardiachealth.org  

 Bradycardia is defined by a heart rate less than the lower limit of normal for age. For infants below 3 years, it is 100 bpm. For children 3-9 years, it is 60 bpm. For 9-16 years, it is 50 bpm. Bradycardial abnormalities can be diagnosed using the 12-lead ECG or the 24-hour holter monitor. 

 Exercise stress testing is not needed in the diagnosis, but may be helpful to determine chronotropic competence. 

 Non-neonatal jaundice 

   

  source: patient.info  

 Jaundice is a yellowish discolouration of the skin, sclera, and mucous membranes due to high counts of bilirubin. It occurs as a result of abnormal bilirubin metabolism and/or secretion. Typically occuring in neonates, jaundice can occur in all age groups. 

 Treatment is done after classifying the jaundice as conjugated or unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia in the older child. Jaundice in older children may be the first clinical manifestation of unrecognized chronic liver disease. 

 Career opportunities 

 Paediatrics is one of those specialties that becomes deeper with more things to explore the more experience you have. Subspecialties in hospitals and community areas include: 

 
	  neonatal intensive care  
	 paediatric oncology 
	 child protection 
	 ambulatory care 
	 asthma 
	 diabetes 
	 counselling 
	 special needs 
 

 A more senior paediatric nurse is likely to have less and less clinical duties as a ward manager or ward sister. A future as a clinical unit manager is entirely within reach. 

 Outside clinical settings, opportunities to work in private healthcare, social services, NGOs, charities, or volunteer organizations are aplenty. 

 Search for high-paying nursing jobs on  MIMS Career . Browse, save, and apply for nursing jobs, all in one-click. Take the opportunity for higher pay and better work locations. Our pages are all mobile-responsive, allowing you to take that leap for a better job whenever, wherever you are. All our job postings are heavily screened to  prevent scams and mistrustful behavior.  
   

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 Emergency Nursing 

 Emergency medicine, formerly known in some countries as accident and emergency medicine (A&E), is the medical specialty involving care for  undifferentiated and unscheduled patients with illnesses or injuries requiring immediate medical attention.  

 Overview 

 As first-line providers, emergency nurses and doctors are responsible for: 

 
	 initiating investigations and interventions to diagnose and/or treat patients in the acute phase 
	 coordinating care with doctors from other specialties 
	 making decisions regarding a patient’s need for hospital admission, observation, or discharge. 
 

 Emergency nurses generally practice in hospital emergency departments, wards, units or intensive care units. They may also be working at pre-hospital settings via emergency medical services, such as in the event of a calamity like a road accident. Moreover, emergency nurses also may work in primary care, such as urgent care clinics. 

 History 

 During the 18th century the French Revolution brought upon the development of the ambulance. After seeing the speed with which the carriages f the French flying artillery maneuvered across the battlefields, French military surgeon Dominique Jean Larrey applied the idea for rapid transport of wounded soldiers to a central place where healthcare was accessible. 

 Emergency medicine and nursing is a relatively new field. It was only in 1979 that a vote by the American Board of Medical Specialties that emergency medicine became a recognized medical specialty in the United States. Other countries followed suit soon thereafter. 

 Scope of Work 

 Emergency nursing is a specialization based on the knowledge and skills for the prevention, diagnosis and management of acute and urgent aspects of illness and injury affecting patients of all age groups with a full spectrum of undifferentiated physical and behavioral disorders. 

 It further encompasses an understanding of the development of pre-hospital and in-hospital emergency medical systems and the skills necessary for this development. 

 Common Tasks 

 
	 Triaging of patients 
	 Suture complex lacerations 
	 reduce a fractured bone or dislocated joint 
	 treat a heart attack 
	 manage strokes 
	 stop severe nosebleeds 
	 placing a chest tube 
	 conducting emergency tracheostomy 
 

 Work location 

 Emergency nurses are tasked to provide the acute care of internal medical and surgical conditions. In many emergency departments, nurses are tasked with seeing an alarmingly large number of patients, treating their illnesses and arranging their next steps. 

 Training 

 There are a variety of models for emergency nursing training across the globe. In some countries the emergency nurse rides in the ambulance to and fro the scene of emergency. This is done to provide stabilizing care to the affected patient. 

 Nurses in emergency departments require a broad field of knowledge and advanced procedural skills of many nursing fields. They must know how to: 

 
	 Resuscitate a patient 
	 Carry out surgical procedures 
	 provide cardiac life support 
	 Manage patients’ airways 
 

 Specialization for emergency nursing often happens after a post-basic certification proceeding three years of service as a registered nurse. 

 Required skillset 

 Emergency nurses require an extensive amount of cool-headedness to handle the oncoming onslaught of daily tasks that present themselves. A great number of emergency ward cases are urgent and time-sensitive in nature, therefore the nurse needs to exercise great caution and patient, while being curt and efficient at the same time. 

 Good teamworking skills is essential. The role of an emergency nurse also involves proper triaging of patients into in- or out-patient services, and work with various specialists or fields to determine the best course of action following prognosis. A positive, proactive, and supportive nurse is beneficial in any emergency setting. 

 Clear communication skills are required in order to convey the correct information to emergency dispatchers or hospital emergency personnel. Failure in conveying correct medical info will prove to be disastrous for the patient, incur financial losses, and increase chances of litigation due to malpractice. 

 Career opportunities 

 Emergency nurses can work in a wide variety of settings, and they include: 

 
	 First aid volunteers 
	 Emergency medical services (BOMBA, paramedics) 
	 paediatric emergency medicine 
	 rescue squads 
	 emergency medical technician 
	 traumatology 
 

 It is not uncommon for nurses to leave clinical work in order to focus on research, especially at the post-graduate levels of study. 

 Search for high-paying nursing jobs on  MIMS Career . Browse, save, and apply for nursing jobs, all in one-click. Take the opportunity for higher pay and better work locations. Our pages are all mobile-responsive, allowing you to take that leap for a better job whenever, wherever you are. All our job postings are  heavily screened to prevent scams and mistrustful behavior.  
   

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  Think About These 5 Things Before You Decide On A Specialization  

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Career Highlight: Emergency Nursing

Emergency Nursing Emergency medicine, formerly known in some countries as accident and emergency medicine (A&E), is the medical specialty involving care for undifferentiated and unscheduled patients with illnesses or injuries...

Read More