See The World, Expand Your Income, And Broaden Your Career Prospects By Working In Bahrain

Marhabaan!

Choosing to work overseas can be a monumental task. That’s why MIMS Career is committed to making your job search and hire process as easy and as clear as possible. This article is aimed for those who are interested in working in the beautiful island-kingdom of Bahrain.

Bahrain is a wonderful archipelago of small islands in the Gulf, with rich culture, history, architecture and entertainment. Read more about what it’s like to live there HERE.

Carry on reading to know nurses can work there.

Qualifications

First up, qualifications.

Bahrain’s hospital policies dictate that for foreign nurses coming in to work must have a degree qualification, with 3 years of experience.

That means you must have a BSN, and work as a registered nurse for at least three years or more.

And that’s about it. No need for IELTS, NCLEX, TOEFL, or any other assessments. It’s fairly straightforward and is a great choice for young nurses.

Apply

Application can be done here or you can contact our consultants through Facebook and website.

Our consultants will guide you through the rest of the application process by matching you with hospitals, aiding you with visa applications, housing, etc.

Let us help you!

That’s all there is to it!

Most people live their entire lives in the same corner of the planet that they were born in. See the same sights, live out the same routine day by day. Why should you do the same?

Apply for our overseas jobs. We’ll help you get there to see the world, and earn more in the process to be financially stable. Gain experience that other people would not have, and expand your horizons.

Hope this inspires you to take up overseas work. Respond to this article by contacting us on our Facebook page or website. We’d love to hear what you think.

Apply for nursing jobs in Bahrain.



Other Articles


 Recently there’s been talk about the Malaysian Nursing Board phasing out the Diploma in Nursing programme. As a result, soon all future nursing students that want to practice the profession in the country has to complete a four-year degree (Bachelor of Science in Nursing). 

 Many parties have been very vocal about this, citing that many nurses cannot afford the extra costs it takes to study for four years instead of the usual two for a diploma. Some students get into nursing for that reason; it offers a quick pathway to work in a respectable profession, without the added burden of a pre-university programme after completion of secondary school. 

 While I understand that some nurses have to support their families ASAP, I’m here to argue that there is a hidden benefit to all nurses being required to do their degree in order to be registered practitioners. 

 That benefit is the extra 2-4 years of age that nurses have upon graduation. 

 Older… Wiser? 

 A few days ago there was news of a 19-year old girl who will become the  youngest medical doctor in Malaysia  this year. The prodigy completed her secondary education at the age of 14, enrolling straight into an Australian pre-U programme, followed by medical school. 

 While I applaud her achievements (it is nothing to make light of), for the rest of us entering the healthcare workforce at 19 is not the best of ideas. 

 A doctor fresh out of medical school at the age of 25 is six years older than 19, and will have six years of extra life experiences that will make him or her relate better to patients. 

 The healthcare line, as we all know, is riddled with a lot of challenges and difficulties that are difficult to teach in training colleges. There are unexpected obstacles from patients, their relatives, and colleagues that are difficult to circumnavigate without emotional maturity. When these are not handled well they lead to burnouts and depression. 

 Forcing the degree programme for nurses rather than diploma grants student nurses extra time to prepare themselves. Most of the time, maturity comes with age. Being a nurse (or a doctor for that matter) is an arduous endeavor in itself. There will be times when you have to react to difficult situations requiring you to make a choice. Maturity grants the wisdom to make the right ones. 

 
 The healthcare line, as we all know, is riddled with a lot of challenges and difficulties that are difficult to teach in training colleges. 
 

 Being sure about oneself 

 As a patient, you would want nurses or doctors who are sure of themselves for your treatment. You want those who believe in what they do and believe in the importance of their work. Not the reluctant ones. 

 It is common for healthcare practitioners to leave the profession within the first 5 years of working. An extra few years of study provides the extra time to contemplate on whether this career path is really for them or not. This creates better rounded nurses and doctors. 

 Better clinicians 

 Better rounded nurses and doctors, who can find the balance between their personal growth and career, make for better clinicians. They are more likely to innovate and push medicine forward. This is why countries like the US and Sweden require prospective medical school students to have a Bachelor’s degree beforehand. These countries have the most number of medical innovations in history. 

 Removal of bad habits 

 
 Better rounded nurses and doctors make for better clinicians. 
 

 For nurses, making BSN degrees mandatory in order to be registered means an addition 4-5 years of study; 1-2 years for a pre-university course (like STPM) and another 4 years for the degree. Contrast this with immediately hopping on the diploma programme for two years after school. 

 The work involved to obtain a degree is very hard. It can only be done by being mentally sound, organized, and effective. These habits are not necessarily attained in school. 

 An older nursing graduate has more time to become a better, organized person; to know her strong points, faults, breaking points, things she cannot do, and learn how to deal with them knowing that a harder road lies ahead.

Making The Case For Longer Studies

Recently there’s been talk about the Malaysian Nursing Board phasing out the Diploma in Nursing programme. As a result, soon all future nursing students that want to practice the profession in the country has to complete a four-year...

Read More