See The World, Expand Your Income, And Broaden Your Career Prospects By Working In Bahrain

Marhabaan!

Choosing to work overseas can be a monumental task. That’s why MIMS Career is committed to making your job search and hire process as easy and as clear as possible. This article is aimed for those who are interested in working in the beautiful island-kingdom of Bahrain.

Bahrain is a wonderful archipelago of small islands in the Gulf, with rich culture, history, architecture and entertainment. Read more about what it’s like to live there HERE.

Carry on reading to know nurses can work there.

Qualifications

First up, qualifications.

Bahrain’s hospital policies dictate that for foreign nurses coming in to work must have a degree qualification, with 3 years of experience.

That means you must have a BSN, and work as a registered nurse for at least three years or more.

And that’s about it. No need for IELTS, NCLEX, TOEFL, or any other assessments. It’s fairly straightforward and is a great choice for young nurses.

Apply

Application can be done here or you can contact our consultants through Facebook and website.

Our consultants will guide you through the rest of the application process by matching you with hospitals, aiding you with visa applications, housing, etc.

Let us help you!

That’s all there is to it!

Most people live their entire lives in the same corner of the planet that they were born in. See the same sights, live out the same routine day by day. Why should you do the same?

Apply for our overseas jobs. We’ll help you get there to see the world, and earn more in the process to be financially stable. Gain experience that other people would not have, and expand your horizons.

Hope this inspires you to take up overseas work. Respond to this article by contacting us on our Facebook page or website. We’d love to hear what you think.

Apply for nursing jobs in Bahrain.



Other Articles



  source: Larm Rmah  

  1. Paediatrics  
 2. History  
 3. Key differences  
 4. Ethics  
 5. Training  
 6. Job scope  
 7. Required skills  
 8. Common Cases  
 9. Career Opportunities  

 Paediatrics 

 Paediatrics is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical of infants, children, and adolescents. The American Academy of Paediatrics recommends people be under paediatric care up to the age of 21. A medical practitioner who specializes in this area is known as a paediatrician. 

 The word paediatrics can be spelled as either  paediatrics , as per British English, or  pediatrics , as per the American counterpart. Both spellings are acceptable. 

 The word paediatrics comes from two Greek words: “ pais “, meaning children, and “ iaitros “, meaning “doctor” or “healer”. Paediatric nurses usually work in hospitals, assisting physicians in specialized subfields like  neonatology . 

 History 

 Paediatrics is considered to be a new subset of medicine today. Ancient Greek physicians like Hippocrates, Aristotle, Celsus, Soranus, and Galen understood the differences in growing organisms like children; as compared to fully-mature adults. Soranus, a Greek physician and gynaecologist from Ephesus (located in modern-day Turkey) has published  records dealing with neonatal paediatrics . 

   

  source: EIT Mental Health  

 Paediatrics as a specialized field of medicine continued to develop in the mid-19th century. The first generally accepted paediatric hospital is the L’Hopital des Enfants Malades, which literally translates from French as “The Hospital for Ill Children.” It opened in Paris in the month of June, 1802. It accepted patients up to the age of 15 years, and still continues to operate today. 

 Key Differences Between Adult and Paediatric Medicine 

 Maturation of the human body is paralleled by differences in body size. In other words, the smaller the infant, the more different the physiology of the said patient. The smaller body of an infant or a neonate (a baby) provides a greater concern to physicians or nurses in the paediatric ward. Congenital defects, genetic variance, and developmental issues adversely affect children more than adults. 

 Children, therefore, must not be treated as “a smaller version of adults.” 

 Nurses and physicians in the paediatric specialty must take into account the immature physiology of the infant or child when considering symptoms, prescribing medications, and diagnosing illnesses. 

 Ethics 

 Another major difference between adult and paediatric medicine, is that  children cannot make decisions for themselves . This is important enough to warrant its own subsection in this article. 

 The issues of guardianship, privacy, legal responsibility and informed consent must  always  be considered in every procedure. 

 
 … children cannot make decisions for themselves. 
 

 Rather than just treating the child, those working in paediatrics often have to treat the parents and the family. Adolescents are in their own legal class, depending on the country, and they have rights to their own health care decisions in certain circumstances. 

 Not only will a paediatric nurse or doctor take into account the desires of a child when considering treatment options, he or she will conform to the wishes of many people. This becomes especially  important when dealing with conditions of poor prognosis, and complicated or painful procedures.  

 Training 

 Courses are available to registered nurses who have completed a minimum number of service years. The number of years differ according to country. The qualifications range from advanced diplomas, to PhD research focusing on paediatric care. Many academicians forgo clinical practice in order to pursue research that will improve the quality of healthcare or bring about favourable policies to the care of children and adolescents. 

   

  source: paediatricemergencies.podbean.com  

 It is very common for paediatric nursing training to be comprised of  didactic  and clinical components covering the management and treatment of acute and complex child patients. 

 In Malaysia, paediatric training also comprises of management of sophisticated technology, providing nurses with the capability to offer quality care in a variety of situations. Training for disease prevention and recuperative treatment are also common modules in a paediatric nursing course. 

 Core modules of training would include  interpersonal skills and counselling ,  values and ethics ,  paediatric principles and practice ,  nursing of children with special needs ,  paediatric oncology , and some clinical practice. 

 Job scope and responsibilities 

 Typical activites may vary according to the role and work setting of the paediatric nurse. Children with special needs often require a different level of care compared to others. With that said, responsibilities include: 

 
	 assessment and critical reporting of patients 
	 preparing patients for pre- or post-op 
	 setting up drips, transfusions 
	 administering drugs and injections 
	 explaining procedures, treatments, to patients or guardians to acquire their consent to treatment 
	 support, comfort, and advise the child and family 
 

 Required skills 

 Children are sensitive, therefore tread lightly when giving care. Paediatric nurses need to display: 

 
	 respect towards the patients and their family’s decisions 
	 excellent communication skills 
	 be able to communicate on a level that the child would understand (if required) 
	 ability to deal with a range of patients at one time 
	 emotional resilience, and mentally strong to handle patients under difficult conditions 
	 compassion to others’ suffering 
 

 Common cases 

 Flat feet 

   

  source: smartlivingnetwork.com  

 Usually happens when the bar ossifies, about 8-12 years old. The tarsal area coalesces and causes rigid and painful flat feet. Operative treatment is not usually needed, unless severe. Usually managed non-operatively. 

 SUFE (Slipped Upper Femoral Epiphysis - also known as SCFE) 

   

  source: Raymond Liu, MD  

 This is a disease that afflicts adolescents (13-18 years old). The growth plate widens during growth spurt and some factors then predispose to slip. Adolescents who suffer from obesity, femoral neck retroversion, endocrinopathies, and trauma are particularly likely to be diagnosed with this. 

 Bradycardia 

   

  source: cardiachealth.org  

 Bradycardia is defined by a heart rate less than the lower limit of normal for age. For infants below 3 years, it is 100 bpm. For children 3-9 years, it is 60 bpm. For 9-16 years, it is 50 bpm. Bradycardial abnormalities can be diagnosed using the 12-lead ECG or the 24-hour holter monitor. 

 Exercise stress testing is not needed in the diagnosis, but may be helpful to determine chronotropic competence. 

 Non-neonatal jaundice 

   

  source: patient.info  

 Jaundice is a yellowish discolouration of the skin, sclera, and mucous membranes due to high counts of bilirubin. It occurs as a result of abnormal bilirubin metabolism and/or secretion. Typically occuring in neonates, jaundice can occur in all age groups. 

 Treatment is done after classifying the jaundice as conjugated or unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia in the older child. Jaundice in older children may be the first clinical manifestation of unrecognized chronic liver disease. 

 Career opportunities 

 Paediatrics is one of those specialties that becomes deeper with more things to explore the more experience you have. Subspecialties in hospitals and community areas include: 

 
	  neonatal intensive care  
	 paediatric oncology 
	 child protection 
	 ambulatory care 
	 asthma 
	 diabetes 
	 counselling 
	 special needs 
 

 A more senior paediatric nurse is likely to have less and less clinical duties as a ward manager or ward sister. A future as a clinical unit manager is entirely within reach. 

 Outside clinical settings, opportunities to work in private healthcare, social services, NGOs, charities, or volunteer organizations are aplenty. 

 Search for high-paying nursing jobs on  MIMS Career . Browse, save, and apply for nursing jobs, all in one-click. Take the opportunity for higher pay and better work locations. Our pages are all mobile-responsive, allowing you to take that leap for a better job whenever, wherever you are. All our job postings are heavily screened to  prevent scams and mistrustful behavior.  
   

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Career Highlight: Paediatric Nursing

source: Larm Rmah 1. Paediatrics 2. History 3. Key differences 4. Ethics 5. Training 6. Job scope 7. Required skills 8. Common Cases 9. Career Opportunities Paediatrics Paediatrics is the...

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 Our team got to know about this privately-run nursing in a cozy neighborhood of Petaling Jaya. Impresif Home Care is run by a total of 3 nurses, 7 workers and their supervisor. We had the chance to speak to the supervisor, Raja. Raja is a wonderful guy, and based on just a few conversations with him you can really tell that he cares a lot about what goes on in the nursing home and its occupants. 

 Impresif Care Home is looking to hire staff nurses with minimal experience to help with their workload.  Visit their job listing page to apply.  

 
  What is the vision behind your nursing home? How did it come about?  

 The home was a house bought by our founders, En. Mohd Faizal and his wife Pn Zainab. Pn. Zainab was a matron for a big hospital. There she realized that a lot of patients still require care, but since they can’t stay admitted for too long they are discharged. 

 It was disheartening to see that, so she and her husband founded this home. We have been privately funded ever since, and do not rely on donations. 

 We have about 30 occupants, with the age range being from 55 to 90 years old. Some of them have children who are not able to take care of them; it is cheaper to send the parents here for nursing care compared to hiring a nurse who comes to the house, which can be very expensive. Some of the occupants here just do not have anywhere to go… but we are grateful we can still support them here. 

  How is the home culture like? 
 
   

 A lot of people come here to visit, thinking it to be depressed and lonely for the elderly to be here. But it’s actually a lot of fun! Everyone tries their best to be happy. I myself have never been happier in my life, now that I’m working here looking after other people. 

 It’s a relatively slow working lifestyle. We wake the occupants up at 630am, then prepare breakfast, wash, clean them, and take them out for exercise. Those who need parenteral feeding will be fed by our nurses. We have lunch around noon, and then it’s some TV time followed by an afternoon nap. Dinner is at 7, then it’s free and easy. 

 Weekends are a bit busier. Relatives and children come over to visit, and will ask the staff questions like “What medication is he/she on?”, or “How has my father been this week?”, things like that. 

 This is a suitable place for nurses out of nursing school to gain some experience before going on to do their Degrees or Post-Basics. The occupants here are all low-dependency type of patients. 

  What do you do to make your staff happy and enjoy working here?  

 It helps that the elderly are all funny and exciting in their own way. I always get “invited” to any one of the uncles or aunties houses. I’ve worked here for 8 years and I still don’t know where their “houses” are.  laughs  

 The location of the home is very nice and quiet. It has easy access to the Federal Highway and the New Pantai Expressway, so staff can easily get here from all over. It can be tiring at times but not as busy as hospital work, and they get paid well too. 

  What cool pieces of tech do you have in your clinic?  

 Everyone has their own wheelchair! So they can decorate or personalize it to fit their own characters. Some carry small tokens on their wheelchairs to remind them of people or places they used to meet. 

 We have fully adjustable beds like the ones in hospitals for our more needy occupants. 

 Our dispensary is always kept fully-stocked. 

  What kind of people are you looking to hire as your staff?  

 We’re looking for nurses who are patient, hardworking, and with a soft heart for the elderly. Applicant must also be willing to work six days a week, especially on weekends. That’s when we’re the most busy. 

  How does your staff get hired?  

 Our nurses gets hired by Pn. Zainab. She talks to the nurses that is going to work here. It’s not much of a screening; it’s just to get to know who you are as a person and how you’ll do your work. 

 We take our staff from maid agencies, so they’re mostly Indonesian. 

  What does the future of this nursing home look like?  

 We want to keep doing what we do for a long time. We’re looking to increase the number of nurses that we employ to help the current workforce cope better with the workload. At the moment we are looking to hire any qualified nurses, even ones with minimal work experience. We’ll help to guide you in the right direction. 

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Institution Highlight: Impresif Care Nursing Home

Our team got to know about this privately-run nursing in a cozy neighborhood of Petaling Jaya. Impresif Home Care is run by a total of 3 nurses, 7 workers and their supervisor. We had the chance to speak to the supervisor, Raja. Raja is a...

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 Palliative care is a multidisciplinary approach to specialized medical care for people with life-limiting illnesses. It focuses on providing people with relief from the symptoms, pain, physical and mental stresses of the terminal diagnosis. The goal of such therapy is to improve quality of life for both the person and their family. 

 Palliative care is provided by a team of physicians, nurses, physiotherapists, occupational therapists and other health professionals who work together with the primary care doctors and referred specialists. It is appropriate at any age and at any stage in a serious illness and can be provided as the main goal of care of along with curative treatment. 

 Although it is an important part of end-of-life care, it is not limited to that stage. Palliative care can be provided across multiple settings including in hospitals, in the patient’s home, as part of the community palliative care programs, and in nursing facilities. Spiritual support is often provided in more interdisciplinary teams. 

 When a medicine or treatment relieves symptoms, but has no curative properties, it is said to be palliative. The word noncurative is sometimes paired with palliative for clarification purposes. 

 Scope 

 Palliative care is for patients with any serious illness and who have a physical or mental distress as a result of the treatment they are undergoing. Palliative care increases comfort by reducing pain, alleviating symptoms, and lessening stress for the patient and family. It is mutually beneficial for both patient and caregiver. 

 Emergency care nurses and doctors have a critical role to begin discussions with patients and their families regarding palliative care as they see them go through difficult times in life. 

 Paediatric palliative care is a rapidly growing subset of this field, and services directed specifically for children with serious illness are in dire need of this. 

 Responsibilities 


 
  Assessment of symptoms
 

 A method fr the assessment of symptoms in patients admitted to palliative care is the Edmonton Symptoms Assessment Scare, in which there are eight visual analog scales of 0 to 10, indicating the levels of pain, activity, nausea, depression, anxiety, drowsiness, appetite and sensation of well-being. On the scale, 0 means absent, and 10 means the worst imaginable possible. Medications are often managed at home by family or nursing support. 


   Further actions 

 Effective methods to ensuring successful palliative care is to provide a safe way for the individual to address their physical and psychological distress, that is to say their total suffering. 

 Dealing with total suffering involves addressing a wide range of concerns, starting with treating physical symptoms such as pain, nausea, and breathlessness. The palliative care teams have become very skillful in prescribing drugs for physical symptoms, and have been instrumental in showing how drugs such as morphine can be used safely while maintaining a patient’s full functions. 

 
  Importance of counselling
 

 Usually, a palliative care patient’s concerns are pain, fears of the future, uncertainties, and worries of their family and feeling like a burden. There are counselling, visual methods, cognitive therapy, and relaxation therapy to deal with it. 

 Pallliative care sees an increasingly wide range of conditions in patients at varying stage of their illness it follows that palliative care teams offer a range of care. This may range form managing the physical symptoms in patients receiving treatment for cancer, to treating depression in patients with advanced disease, to the care of patients in their last days and hours. 

 Training 

 In most countries hospice and palliative care is provided by an interdisciplinary team consisting of physicians, pharmacists, registered nurses, nursing assistant, social workers, and others. The focus on the team is to optimize the patient’s comfort. 

 Nurses in palliative care are given extensive training in counselling, medication dispensing, and support. The aim is about relieving distressing symptoms for the patient. Nurses are also part of the management of the imminently dying patient, more so than the physicians or doctors themselves. 

 Work Opportunities 

 The work opportunities that we get is aplenty. Palliative care is often used interchageably as a term with hospice care, albeit some slight differences. They share some similar goals of providing symptom relief and pain management. Palliative care services can be offered to any patient without restriction to disease or prognosis, and can be appropriate for anyone with a serious, complex illness, whether they are expected to recover fully or not. 

 Hospice is a type of care involving palliation without curative intent. usually it is used for people with no further options for curing their disease or in people who have decided to not pursue treatment that is hard on them. 

 Typically hospice and palliative care nurses work in non-hospital settings.

Career Highlight: Palliative Care

Palliative care is a multidisciplinary approach to specialized medical care for people with life-limiting illnesses. It focuses on providing people with relief from the symptoms, pain, physical and mental stresses of the terminal diagnosis. The...

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  1. Start high  
 2. Look for an agreeable outcome  
 3. Be aware of supply in the area  
 4. Rates are not permanent  
 5. Negotiate other aspects of your rates  

 Locum Jobs 

 An advantage of taking up locum jobs to boost your income is that you have some flexibility to work. You choose the schedule that you are available to fit into. Also, it can  improve your CV  for future job applications at other institutions by showing that you have a diverse set of employers. 

 For new nurses, doing locum allows you extra time and exposure to choose how you want to plan out your nursing career. Like selecting a specialization. You can read more on the  advantages of doing locum to increase your income here . 

 People seem to be paralyzed into inaction when it comes to setting rates, simply accepting whatever the clinic offers to pay you. While this article focuses on nurses doing locum jobs at private practices, we hope that these points will still be able to help doctors, pharmacists, dentists, and other healthcare practitioners as well. 

 1. Start high 

   

  source: @dan_carl5on  

 Start out by always proposing a rate higher than you would. It doesn’t have to be a lot. 

 Say your desired rate is RM20 an hour. Just mention RM25 as your starting rate. You can slowly reduce it to the price that you sought out initially when discussing with the clinic or institution. 

 You don’t want to be working with people who feel like they have to squeeze the most out of their budget to accommodate you. Such scenarios do not lead to healthy long-term relationships. It’s better to make them feel like they’ve got a good deal. 

 2. Look for an agreeable outcome 

   

  source: pixabay  

 Remember, the owner of the clinic wants to fill some gaps in his workforce, and you want to get paid. Think of it as a bridge. Both of you are on either side. The best outcome is if you both meet in the middle. 

 Don’t rip people off. Good negotiation is about both parties walking away feeling like they both got a good deal. If you think that milking out money from people to the point where they are reluctantly agreeing to your prices, think again. That relationship isn’t going to last very long. 

 The best employer (whether they employ you full-time or otherwise) is one that continuously offers you work. They can’t do that if they don’t like you. 

 3. Be aware of supply in the area 

   

  source: pixabay  

 A lot of nurses doing locum jobs in the area? That might affect your locum fees. Try to look for clinics or institutions that have an under-supply of part-time nurses. The main reason why your locum employer is paying you below average is probably because a replacement for you is so easy to find. 

 Price is a reflection of the demand for the locum jobs and the supply of those capable of doing it in the area. This is commonly known as the law of supply and demand in economics. It applies here as well. 

 4. Rates are not permanent 

   

  source: here  

 Rates are not set in stone. Even if you’ve negotiated quite a while ago, you can still make some changes if you approach the employer tactfully. 

 Explain that you’ve been here for a while, and that you haven’t let him/her down. So you’d like an increase in your rates. 

 The worst thing that can happen is they say no. Don’t worry. It’s not the end of the world. At least you tried. 

 5. Negotiate other aspects of your rates 

   

  source: pixabay  

 While there is a fixed rate for your schedule, try to consider other aspects as well. Things like emergency calls, or last-minute requests to come in for locum. 

 Make it clear to the employer that these are out-of-the-norm occurrences, and that you would like to be compensated accordingly. 

 6. Losing locum jobs is not necessarily a bad thing 

   

  source: blupics  

 When increasing your rates, this isn’t necessarily a bad thing. Doubling your rates but losing half of locum opportunities is great. You get the same amount at the end, but work half as much, which frees up your time. 

 Plus, sometimes someone who charges RM40 per hour looks more professional and qualified than someone who charges RM20 per hour. 

 Conclusion 

 Don’t just look at financial rates; benefits are important as well. Is the job good for your reputation? Are they likely to recommend you to others? 

 Is the work consistent and secure? Do you trust the employer? 

 Remember these 6 steps when negotiating your fees.  If you don’t value your time, no one else will.  

 Browse through  MIMS Career  for an easy way to find locum or part-time jobs in your area.  MIMS Career  is a premier, healthcare-focused job portal site for Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines and Indonesia. Our simple sign-up process allows you to easily apply for jobs you might be interested in with a single click. Job locations include hospitals, nursing homes, and private practices. It’s free, easy to use, and safe. 

 Can’t find what you’re looking for? Set up a job alert and we’ll notify you by email whenever positions that suit your preferences are available. All of our pages are mobile-responsive, so you can take your applications with you on the go. 
   

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The Complete Guide to Negotiating Locum Rates

1. Start high 2. Look for an agreeable outcome 3. Be aware of supply in the area 4. Rates are not permanent 5. Negotiate other aspects of your rates Locum Jobs An advantage of taking up locum jobs to boost your...

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 Introduction 

 Community health is the focus of the health of a population of a community group, rather than on individuals. It is a very distinct field of medicine and nursing, and therefore must be taught in a separate school of public or community health. 

 The health of a community in the current socio-economic climate poses many challenges that need to be overcome. There are many work opportunities that offer different kinds of responsibilities and skills that healthcare professionals are encouraged to look into. 

   

 In history, there are a few diseases that have caused a big impact to the world; such diseases include smallpox, polio, measles and mumps. Whilst largely eradicated today, these were debilitating diseases that caused the death of millions, often in a very short span of time. Their eradication is due to large movements by governing bodies to curb these diseases by education and clinical methods to promote mass immunities. More recently, outbreaks like dengue, malaria, and HIV/AIDS continue to pose a threat to the health and well-being of local communities. 

 Community health has caused a lot of good even in non-medical sectors. Mandatory schooling was put into place after it was found that the industrial revolution workplace was detrimental to their well-being. The science of epidemiology (the study of diseases) came about after efforts to understand cholera were being propagated by the British. Also, stronger health and safety standards for foods brought about a remarked interest in wholesome foods for the European population. 

 Why is it important? 

 Herd immunity contains the spread of contagious diseases. It is the basis on which community health (or public health, depending on which region of the world you’re from) is formed upon. 

 Herd immunity is a concept in which most members of the community are protected against that disease because there is little opportunity for an outbreak. 

 Vaccines are used extensively in this; influenza, measles, mumps, rotavirus, and several dangerous pneumococcal strains are kept at bay due to herd immunizations. These debilitating diseases are extremely dangerous when left to infect a large community. It can cause losses of life, economic downturns, and even social upheaval. 

   

 There is a growing anti-science and anti-vaccination movement that is seriously undoing all the work physicians, researchers, and epidemiologists have done. These people are averse to any form of scientific and health information that they put their communities at risk because they shun vaccinations and community health practices. 

 A major part of community health lies in the communication of healthcare. When the anti-vaccine crowd refuse to immunize their children, it puts their children and the children of others at risk of conntagions that would normally be of no issue. This fracture in the community is enough to bring back long-eradicated bugs into modern society. It is a major issue to address amongst community health practitioners, doctors, and nurses. 

 How does the work look like? 

 Community health is divided into three: primary, secondary, and tertiary. While loosely related, they all have differing lines of work, responsibility, and career progression. 

 Primary 

 Primary community healthcare focuses on the individual. These are interventions like  hand-washing, personal hygiene, immunization, circumcision, diet , and so on. 

 Health communication is key in this area. One can be a nurse, but when working in primary he/she can be a speaker to communicate these practices to the public. 

 Secondary 

 This concerns the  environment . The draining of puddles to prevent mosquito breeding, spraying of insecticides to avoid disease vectors like cockroaches , and clearing of rubbish to address rat populations are all part of this. 

 Tertiary 

 Tertiary healthcare consists of  clinical interventions . Things like rehydration, surgery, and so on. 

 How to work in community health? 

 Your options are pretty wide. You can check out the public, education, private, and non-profit sectors. 

 In the public sector, institutes like IMR (Institute of Medical Research) work closely with the Ministry of Health (KKM) to deploy methods in increasing the health and wellness of Malaysians as a population. Recently they are doing extensive work combating childhood obesity with they  myBFF (My Body is Fit and Fabulous) program . 

 The education sector will be rife of opportunities for clinicians who wish to work in a non-clinical setting. Universities, schools and colleges are potential work areas. 

 The private sector has a lot of companies waiting to get into the healthcare industry as a business. Our company  MIMS  provides timely information to educate the public and healthcare professionals on latest issues on healthcare. Also we provide a drug information service that physicians and consumers can search any time, anywhere. 

 Non-profit organizations like MAKNA (National Cancer Council Malaysia), or NKF (National Kidney Foundation) hire employees with a clinical background to help them raise awareness of the diseases or patients that they focus on. They constantly look out for people to help them with communication, treatments, and financing. 

 Career Progression 

 Search about these points below to know more about your potential career paths: 

 
	 Biostatistics programs 
	 Environmental health and science programs 
	 Social behavioral programs 
	 Epidemiology programs 
	 health services and administration programs 
 

 Search for high-paying nursing jobs on  MIMS Career . Browse, save, and apply for nursing jobs, all in one-click. Take the opportunity for higher pay and better work locations. Our pages are all mobile-responsive, allowing you to take that leap for a better job whenever, wherever you are. All our job postings are heavily screened to prevent scams and mistrustful behavior.

Career Highlight: Community Health

Introduction Community health is the focus of the health of a population of a community group, rather than on individuals. It is a very distinct field of medicine and nursing, and therefore must be taught in a separate school of public or...

Read More