5 Ways To Make Travelling To and From Work More Enjoyable

Let’s get down on the breakdown of how to avoid your meltdowns because of commuting downtown.

That rhyme scheme though. Okay, let’s get to it: here are five ways to make your terrible commute a little bit more bearable:

1. Consume great content: Learn something!

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Podcasts

Podcasts are an amazing way to pass the time during long commutes. Fill up your wasted time in traffic or on public transport by listening to high-quality conversations that teach you something.

For those unfamiliar with the term, a podcast is sort of like a radio show; it’s a conversation between two or more people, or it’s a talk by someone with ideas or topics worth sharing. Think of it as on-demand radio talk shows, digitized into a digestible format.

The best method of listening to podcasts on the go is using your phone. on iOS, the Podcasts app does a pretty good job; you can browse and subscribe to shows then listen to them within the app. For extra features, Overcast does an amazing job; it has smart speed features that eliminate pauses in conversations. It also boosts voice audio using smart algorithms to provide you a clear sound over the hustle and bustle of your commute.

On Android, Pocket Casts is an excellent podcast-listening app.

Recommended listens: Dan Carlin’s Hardcore History, The Tim Ferriss Show, and TED Talks: Science and Medicine.

Books

Statistics show that 42 percent of people after graduation never read another book again.

42 percent! Don’t let that be you. High achievers all finish an average of 10 books per year. Read! And we don’t mean read magazines or newspapers. Read fiction. Non-fiction. Documentaries. Biographies.

Even reading for ten minutes on the train or bus, when done every day, you can finish way more than ten books in a year.

Can’t read because you drive? Listen to audiobooks: books that are narrated by professional narrators. We recommend Audible for your audiobook needs.

Take online courses

The best thing about mobile internet is that you can access an entire wealth of knowledge from the world wide web, right in the palm of your hands.

Skillshare, Udemy, and Udacity are all great resources for you to learn anything.

Learning never stops! Read more on why healthcare professionals need to practice lifelong learning HERE.

2. Clear your mind

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Meditative exercises

Whether or not you work the AM shift or the PM shift, we could all use some peace and quiet before the workday begins. A bit of meditation can go a long way in calming you down, preparing yourself mentally for all the chaos that comes ahead of you.

Read about the 5 minute meditation all nurses should know about HERE.

Practice mindfulness

Mindfulness is the act of being in the moment, the ability to be fully aware of where we are and what we’re doing. Mindfulness allows us to not be overly reactive or overwhelmed by what’s going on around us.

Just be still, and focus on your breathing. Notice when your mind wanders. If it does, return your attention to your breaths.

Studies have shown that medical practitioners who practice this are happier and better at their jobs.

3. Do something productive!

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Triage your emails and tasks

Triage is not just for patients! Triage your tasks for the day. For those of you who have a more administrative role in your workplace, sift through your email inbox during your commute.

Archive or delete the ones that do not require any action. Draft replies for important emails. Add some to your task lists.

Do this and you will focus more on doing things rather than thinking about what to do.

Journal

Write in your journal every day during your commute. List down your worries, your concerns. Also write down what you’re grateful for. Sometimes, just acknowledging that we’re lucky to have a lot of things just makes the day automatically better.

The benefits are many. Successful people throughout the ages have all kept a journal in which they spent so much time on. Florence Nightingale wrote extensively in her journal, which became the basis of a lot of the texts that she wrote on nursing.

You can journal in a small notebook that you keep in your bag on your commute. Alternatively you can decide to go digital: writing your journal in a digital format allows you to save it and retrieve it in the future.

4. Talk to someone!

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When was the last time you called your parents? That long-time friend that you drifted away from?

You can even strike up a conversation with the person sitting next to you. Try it; don’t be shy. You might even be surprised with the conversations you end up having.

5. Change workplace!

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In the end, if your commute is just god-awful, dreadful, soul-sucking, life-sapping… (ok you get the idea) then you should probably request for a change in workplace.

Or apply for a job nearer to where you live using MIMS Career, our amazing portal for healthcare professionals like you. Simply filter jobs by location, and browse through hundreds of our listings. Save them for later. Or apply straight away, on your phone of desktop. It just works.

The shorter the commute, the happier the workers. Give it a shot with MIMS Career.



Other Articles




  1. Specialization tasks  
 2. Pathway  
 3. Common job scopes  
 4. Common terms  
 5. Career opportunities  

 Cardiology 

 Cardiology is a branch of medicine dealing with disorders of the heart as well as parts of the circulatory system the field includes medical diagnosis and treatment of  congenital heart defects ,  coronary artery disease ,  heart failure ,  valvular heart disease  and  electrophysiology . Physicians who specialize in cardiac surgery are called cardiothoracic surgeons or cardiac surgeons. The supporting role of the surgeons and physicians are  cardiology nurses . 

 Although the cardiovascular system is inextricably linked to blood, cardiology is relatively unconcerned with hematology and its diseases. Some obvious exceptions that affect the function of the heart would be blood tests, decreased oxygen carrying capacity, and  coagulopathies . 

   

  source: Resus.me  

 Specialization Tasks 

 All cardiologists study the disorders of the heart and all cardiology nurses are trained to take care of either adult or children conditions. This is due to differing aspects of training for adult and paediatric physiology. Surgical aspects are not included in cardiology and are in the domain of cardiothoracic surgery. 

 For example, coronary artery bypass surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass are both surgical procedures performed by surgeons, and not cardiologists. As a nurse, your task will be that of assisting the cardiologists in this matter. A properly-trained cardiology nurse would have the necessary critical thinking in order to draw conclusions to make meaningful impact of treatment. 

 Common tasks in the wards that you might have to do include the insertion of stents, pacemakers, and valves. 

 Pathway 

   

  source: verywell  

 Cardiology is a specialty of internal medicine. To be a cardiology nurse, a three-year work experience followed by a post-basic or relevant course is required. It is possible to sub-specialize in Malaysia. Recognized sub-specialties in cardiology for Malaysia are cardiac  electrophysiology ,  echocardiography,  interventional cardiology, and  nuclear cardiology . 

 Currently there is insufficient data for Malaysia, for salary, but it is guaranteed to be higher or on par with other similar nursing specialists. 

 Common job scopes 

 Cardiology is a vast field. Not only does it involve the heart and its systems, it also involves supporting systems such as haematology and its diseases. It is important to know and train for this when pursuing this specialization. 

 Cardiac electrophysiology 

   

  An example of echocardiography  

 This is the science of elucidating, diagnosing, and treating the electrical activities of the heart. The term is usually used to desccribe studies of such phenomena by  invasive catheter recording  of spontaneous activity as well as of cardiac responses to programmed electrical stimulations. These studies are performed to assess complex arrythmias, relieve symptoms, evauate abnormal ECGs, assess risk of developing arrhythmias in the future, and to design treatment. 

 Cardiac examination 

 The cardiology nurse is able to carry out cardiac examinations of patients. It is performed as part of a physical examination, or when a patient presents with chest pain suggestive of a cardiovascular pathology. It would typically be modified depending on the indication and integrated with other examinations especially the respiratory examination. Like all medical examinations, the cardiac examination follows the standard structure of inspection, palpation, and auscultation. 

 Paediatric cardiology 

   

  source  

 Paediatric cardiology is a specialty of paediatrics. To be a paediatric cardiology nurse, one must complete at least three years of registered working experience and pass all the required courses. Adult cardiology certifications are not valid due to differences in physiology in children. 

 Common complications that you will see as a nurse practicing paediatric cardiology are  paediatric hypertension ,  paediatric hyperlipidemia , heart palpitations and arryhthmias. 

 Diagnostic tests 

 Diagnostic tests in cardiology are the methods of identifying heart conditions associated with healthy vs. unhealthy pathology heart function. It is commonly started by obtaining a medical history, followed by auscultation. Blood tests soon precede after, and imaging can be done on a need-to-do basis. 

 Common terms 

 1. Tetralogy of Fallot 

 It is the most common congenital ehart disease arising in 1-3 cases per 1000 births. The cause of this defect is a ventricular septal defect and an overriding aorta. These two defects combined causes deoxygenated blood to bypass the lungs and going right back into the circulatory system. The modified  Blalock-Taussig  is used as a treatment for this condition. 

 2. Pulmonary atresia 

 This happens in 7-8 births per 100,000 and is characterized by the aorta brancing out of the right ventricle. It causes deoxygenated blood to bypass the lungs and enter the circulatory system. Fixing it can by done by a team of cardiologists and nurses by redirecting the aorta and fixing the right ventricle-pulmonary artery connection in surgeries. 

 3. Double Outlet Right Ventricle 

 Double outlet right ventricle is when both great arteries, the pulmonary artery and the aorta, are connected to the right ventricle. There is usually a ventricle in different particular places depending on the variations of DORV, typically 50% are subaortic. A VSD closure is the most common form of treatment for this condition. 

 Career opportunities 

 Search for  high-paying cardiology nursing jobs  on  MIMS Career . Browse, save, and apply for nursing jobs, all in one-click. Take the opportunity for higher pay and better work locations. Our pages are all mobile-responsive, allowing you to take that leap for a better job whenever, wherever you are. All our job postings are heavily screened to  prevent scams and mistrustful behavior . 
   

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Career Highlight: Specialty in Cardiology

1. Specialization tasks 2. Pathway 3. Common job scopes 4. Common terms 5. Career opportunities Cardiology Cardiology is a branch of medicine dealing with disorders of the heart as well as parts of the...

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 Introduction 

 Community health is the focus of the health of a population of a community group, rather than on individuals. It is a very distinct field of medicine and nursing, and therefore must be taught in a separate school of public or community health. 

 The health of a community in the current socio-economic climate poses many challenges that need to be overcome. There are many work opportunities that offer different kinds of responsibilities and skills that healthcare professionals are encouraged to look into. 

   

 In history, there are a few diseases that have caused a big impact to the world; such diseases include smallpox, polio, measles and mumps. Whilst largely eradicated today, these were debilitating diseases that caused the death of millions, often in a very short span of time. Their eradication is due to large movements by governing bodies to curb these diseases by education and clinical methods to promote mass immunities. More recently, outbreaks like dengue, malaria, and HIV/AIDS continue to pose a threat to the health and well-being of local communities. 

 Community health has caused a lot of good even in non-medical sectors. Mandatory schooling was put into place after it was found that the industrial revolution workplace was detrimental to their well-being. The science of epidemiology (the study of diseases) came about after efforts to understand cholera were being propagated by the British. Also, stronger health and safety standards for foods brought about a remarked interest in wholesome foods for the European population. 

 Why is it important? 

 Herd immunity contains the spread of contagious diseases. It is the basis on which community health (or public health, depending on which region of the world you’re from) is formed upon. 

 Herd immunity is a concept in which most members of the community are protected against that disease because there is little opportunity for an outbreak. 

 Vaccines are used extensively in this; influenza, measles, mumps, rotavirus, and several dangerous pneumococcal strains are kept at bay due to herd immunizations. These debilitating diseases are extremely dangerous when left to infect a large community. It can cause losses of life, economic downturns, and even social upheaval. 

   

 There is a growing anti-science and anti-vaccination movement that is seriously undoing all the work physicians, researchers, and epidemiologists have done. These people are averse to any form of scientific and health information that they put their communities at risk because they shun vaccinations and community health practices. 

 A major part of community health lies in the communication of healthcare. When the anti-vaccine crowd refuse to immunize their children, it puts their children and the children of others at risk of conntagions that would normally be of no issue. This fracture in the community is enough to bring back long-eradicated bugs into modern society. It is a major issue to address amongst community health practitioners, doctors, and nurses. 

 How does the work look like? 

 Community health is divided into three: primary, secondary, and tertiary. While loosely related, they all have differing lines of work, responsibility, and career progression. 

 Primary 

 Primary community healthcare focuses on the individual. These are interventions like  hand-washing, personal hygiene, immunization, circumcision, diet , and so on. 

 Health communication is key in this area. One can be a nurse, but when working in primary he/she can be a speaker to communicate these practices to the public. 

 Secondary 

 This concerns the  environment . The draining of puddles to prevent mosquito breeding, spraying of insecticides to avoid disease vectors like cockroaches , and clearing of rubbish to address rat populations are all part of this. 

 Tertiary 

 Tertiary healthcare consists of  clinical interventions . Things like rehydration, surgery, and so on. 

 How to work in community health? 

 Your options are pretty wide. You can check out the public, education, private, and non-profit sectors. 

 In the public sector, institutes like IMR (Institute of Medical Research) work closely with the Ministry of Health (KKM) to deploy methods in increasing the health and wellness of Malaysians as a population. Recently they are doing extensive work combating childhood obesity with they  myBFF (My Body is Fit and Fabulous) program . 

 The education sector will be rife of opportunities for clinicians who wish to work in a non-clinical setting. Universities, schools and colleges are potential work areas. 

 The private sector has a lot of companies waiting to get into the healthcare industry as a business. Our company  MIMS  provides timely information to educate the public and healthcare professionals on latest issues on healthcare. Also we provide a drug information service that physicians and consumers can search any time, anywhere. 

 Non-profit organizations like MAKNA (National Cancer Council Malaysia), or NKF (National Kidney Foundation) hire employees with a clinical background to help them raise awareness of the diseases or patients that they focus on. They constantly look out for people to help them with communication, treatments, and financing. 

 Career Progression 

 Search about these points below to know more about your potential career paths: 

 
	 Biostatistics programs 
	 Environmental health and science programs 
	 Social behavioral programs 
	 Epidemiology programs 
	 health services and administration programs 
 

 Search for high-paying nursing jobs on  MIMS Career . Browse, save, and apply for nursing jobs, all in one-click. Take the opportunity for higher pay and better work locations. Our pages are all mobile-responsive, allowing you to take that leap for a better job whenever, wherever you are. All our job postings are heavily screened to prevent scams and mistrustful behavior.

Career Highlight: Community Health

Introduction Community health is the focus of the health of a population of a community group, rather than on individuals. It is a very distinct field of medicine and nursing, and therefore must be taught in a separate school of public or...

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 Recently there’s been talk about the Malaysian Nursing Board phasing out the Diploma in Nursing programme. As a result, soon all future nursing students that want to practice the profession in the country has to complete a four-year degree (Bachelor of Science in Nursing). 

 Many parties have been very vocal about this, citing that many nurses cannot afford the extra costs it takes to study for four years instead of the usual two for a diploma. Some students get into nursing for that reason; it offers a quick pathway to work in a respectable profession, without the added burden of a pre-university programme after completion of secondary school. 

 While I understand that some nurses have to support their families ASAP, I’m here to argue that there is a hidden benefit to all nurses being required to do their degree in order to be registered practitioners. 

 That benefit is the extra 2-4 years of age that nurses have upon graduation. 

 Older… Wiser? 

 A few days ago there was news of a 19-year old girl who will become the  youngest medical doctor in Malaysia  this year. The prodigy completed her secondary education at the age of 14, enrolling straight into an Australian pre-U programme, followed by medical school. 

 While I applaud her achievements (it is nothing to make light of), for the rest of us entering the healthcare workforce at 19 is not the best of ideas. 

 A doctor fresh out of medical school at the age of 25 is six years older than 19, and will have six years of extra life experiences that will make him or her relate better to patients. 

 The healthcare line, as we all know, is riddled with a lot of challenges and difficulties that are difficult to teach in training colleges. There are unexpected obstacles from patients, their relatives, and colleagues that are difficult to circumnavigate without emotional maturity. When these are not handled well they lead to burnouts and depression. 

 Forcing the degree programme for nurses rather than diploma grants student nurses extra time to prepare themselves. Most of the time, maturity comes with age. Being a nurse (or a doctor for that matter) is an arduous endeavor in itself. There will be times when you have to react to difficult situations requiring you to make a choice. Maturity grants the wisdom to make the right ones. 

 
 The healthcare line, as we all know, is riddled with a lot of challenges and difficulties that are difficult to teach in training colleges. 
 

 Being sure about oneself 

 As a patient, you would want nurses or doctors who are sure of themselves for your treatment. You want those who believe in what they do and believe in the importance of their work. Not the reluctant ones. 

 It is common for healthcare practitioners to leave the profession within the first 5 years of working. An extra few years of study provides the extra time to contemplate on whether this career path is really for them or not. This creates better rounded nurses and doctors. 

 Better clinicians 

 Better rounded nurses and doctors, who can find the balance between their personal growth and career, make for better clinicians. They are more likely to innovate and push medicine forward. This is why countries like the US and Sweden require prospective medical school students to have a Bachelor’s degree beforehand. These countries have the most number of medical innovations in history. 

 Removal of bad habits 

 
 Better rounded nurses and doctors make for better clinicians. 
 

 For nurses, making BSN degrees mandatory in order to be registered means an addition 4-5 years of study; 1-2 years for a pre-university course (like STPM) and another 4 years for the degree. Contrast this with immediately hopping on the diploma programme for two years after school. 

 The work involved to obtain a degree is very hard. It can only be done by being mentally sound, organized, and effective. These habits are not necessarily attained in school. 

 An older nursing graduate has more time to become a better, organized person; to know her strong points, faults, breaking points, things she cannot do, and learn how to deal with them knowing that a harder road lies ahead.

Making The Case For Longer Studies

Recently there’s been talk about the Malaysian Nursing Board phasing out the Diploma in Nursing programme. As a result, soon all future nursing students that want to practice the profession in the country has to complete a four-year...

Read More