5 Ways To Make Travelling To and From Work More Enjoyable

Let’s get down on the breakdown of how to avoid your meltdowns because of commuting downtown.

That rhyme scheme though. Okay, let’s get to it: here are five ways to make your terrible commute a little bit more bearable:

1. Consume great content: Learn something!

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Podcasts are an amazing way to pass the time during long commutes. Fill up your wasted time in traffic or on public transport by listening to high-quality conversations that teach you something.

For those unfamiliar with the term, a podcast is sort of like a radio show; it’s a conversation between two or more people, or it’s a talk by someone with ideas or topics worth sharing. Think of it as on-demand radio talk shows, digitized into a digestible format.

The best method of listening to podcasts on the go is using your phone. on iOS, the Podcasts app does a pretty good job; you can browse and subscribe to shows then listen to them within the app. For extra features, Overcast does an amazing job; it has smart speed features that eliminate pauses in conversations. It also boosts voice audio using smart algorithms to provide you a clear sound over the hustle and bustle of your commute.

On Android, Pocket Casts is an excellent podcast-listening app.

Recommended listens: Dan Carlin’s Hardcore History, The Tim Ferriss Show, and TED Talks: Science and Medicine.


Statistics show that 42 percent of people after graduation never read another book again.

42 percent! Don’t let that be you. High achievers all finish an average of 10 books per year. Read! And we don’t mean read magazines or newspapers. Read fiction. Non-fiction. Documentaries. Biographies.

Even reading for ten minutes on the train or bus, when done every day, you can finish way more than ten books in a year.

Can’t read because you drive? Listen to audiobooks: books that are narrated by professional narrators. We recommend Audible for your audiobook needs.

Take online courses

The best thing about mobile internet is that you can access an entire wealth of knowledge from the world wide web, right in the palm of your hands.

Skillshare, Udemy, and Udacity are all great resources for you to learn anything.

Learning never stops! Read more on why healthcare professionals need to practice lifelong learning HERE.

2. Clear your mind

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Meditative exercises

Whether or not you work the AM shift or the PM shift, we could all use some peace and quiet before the workday begins. A bit of meditation can go a long way in calming you down, preparing yourself mentally for all the chaos that comes ahead of you.

Read about the 5 minute meditation all nurses should know about HERE.

Practice mindfulness

Mindfulness is the act of being in the moment, the ability to be fully aware of where we are and what we’re doing. Mindfulness allows us to not be overly reactive or overwhelmed by what’s going on around us.

Just be still, and focus on your breathing. Notice when your mind wanders. If it does, return your attention to your breaths.

Studies have shown that medical practitioners who practice this are happier and better at their jobs.

3. Do something productive!

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Triage your emails and tasks

Triage is not just for patients! Triage your tasks for the day. For those of you who have a more administrative role in your workplace, sift through your email inbox during your commute.

Archive or delete the ones that do not require any action. Draft replies for important emails. Add some to your task lists.

Do this and you will focus more on doing things rather than thinking about what to do.


Write in your journal every day during your commute. List down your worries, your concerns. Also write down what you’re grateful for. Sometimes, just acknowledging that we’re lucky to have a lot of things just makes the day automatically better.

The benefits are many. Successful people throughout the ages have all kept a journal in which they spent so much time on. Florence Nightingale wrote extensively in her journal, which became the basis of a lot of the texts that she wrote on nursing.

You can journal in a small notebook that you keep in your bag on your commute. Alternatively you can decide to go digital: writing your journal in a digital format allows you to save it and retrieve it in the future.

4. Talk to someone!

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When was the last time you called your parents? That long-time friend that you drifted away from?

You can even strike up a conversation with the person sitting next to you. Try it; don’t be shy. You might even be surprised with the conversations you end up having.

5. Change workplace!

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In the end, if your commute is just god-awful, dreadful, soul-sucking, life-sapping… (ok you get the idea) then you should probably request for a change in workplace.

Or apply for a job nearer to where you live using MIMS Career, our amazing portal for healthcare professionals like you. Simply filter jobs by location, and browse through hundreds of our listings. Save them for later. Or apply straight away, on your phone of desktop. It just works.

The shorter the commute, the happier the workers. Give it a shot with MIMS Career.

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 Finding a new job can be very tiring, and time-consuming. It can be difficult to schedule some time to your job-seeking activities. However, the end of the year is a period of time you don’t want to miss if you want to maximize your chances of landing that precious new job. Here are four reasons why: 

  1. Employers are getting ready for the New Year  


 Traditionally people wouldn’t advise you to hunt for a job at the end of the year, when employers have maxed their yearly budgets and are just closing the financial year with some wrap-up activities. 

 But growing evidence seems to suggest otherwise: as employers return from the holidays with a renewed vigor, new goals, and new KPIs, they are more inclined to act upon your application immediately. 

  2. Employers have plans for 2018  


 Whether its a big hospital, a small clinic, or a humble retirement home, everybody uses the last few weeks of the year to reflect back on their performance in order to stay afloat. It is normally during these periods of time that they make the decision to allocate budgets to hire new staff… 

 So get to applying! 

  3. You’re ready to apply for one  


 The best time to apply for a job is also whenever you feel you’re ready. 

 When you want new experiences, new training, different exposure, or an increase in salary… you know it’s time to go. 

 So update your resume, acquire new skills, and hunt for that job. 

  4. You’re starting to feel miserable at your job  
Find yourself feeling unnaturally tired? Even if you’ve been getting enough sleep? 

 If you’ve been exhibiting signs of stress due to your current job like fatigue, headaches, migraines and depression, it’s probably a sign that you should cut your losses and look for opportunities elsewhere. 

 Don’t think it’s your fault for not being able to fit in… sometimes the shoe just doesn’t fit.

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 Nephrology/Renal Nursing 

 Nephrology is a specialty of medicine and pediatrics that concerns itself with the kidneys:  the study of normal kidney function, kidney problems, kidney health, and the treatment of kidney problems.  It encompasses dietary and medication to replacement forms of treatments. Systemic conditions that affect the kidneys and systemic problems that occur as a result of kidney problems are also studied in nephrology. A physician who has undertaken additional training to become an expert in nephrology may call themselves a nephrologist or a renal physician. 

 A nephrology nurse (or renal nurse - those two terms are used interchangeably) is a nursing practitioner that focuses on kidney health. They treat and care for patients that are suffering from those suffering from kidney problems as well as those that are at risk of developing them. 

 As a renal nurse, one must be prepared to stay on top of current developments, as treatments in this field are accelerating their development at a very rapid pace. This is possible to be done by regular consumption of renal-related literary content such as medical journals. Attending seminars and conference is also a possible method. 


 Renal nursing concerns the  diagnosis and treatment of kidney diseases , including electrolyte disturbances and hypertension, and the care of those needing replacement therapy, including dialysis and transplant patients. 

 Many diseases affecting the kidney are systemic disorders not limited to the organ itself. Examples include acquired conditions such as systemic vasculitides and autoimmune diseases, as well as congenital or generic conditions such as polycystic kidney disease. 

 Methodology of nursing 

  History and physical examinations are central to the diagnostic workup in nephrology or renal nursing.   

 This may include inquires regarding family history, general medical history, diet, medication use, drug use and occupation. Examination typically includes an assessment of volume state, blood pressure, skin, joints, abdomen, and flank. 

 Urinary analysis (urinalysis) is an instrumental method in assessing possible kidney problems. Nurses in this specialization are trained to notice the appearance of blood in the urine, protein, pus cells or cancer cells in the urine, often with the help of a urologist or nephrology physician. 

 Basic blood tests can be used to check the concentration of hemoglobin, platelets, sodium, potassium, chloride, or phosphate in the blood. All of these may be affected by kidney problems, and renal nurses are supposed to be well-versed in this area. 

 Under certain circumstances, an invasive test is required for diagnosis. A biopsy of the kidney may be performed. This typically involves the insertion, under local anesthetic and ultrasound or CT guidance, of a core biopsy needle into the kidney to obtain a small sample of kidney tissue. Kidney biopsy is also used to monitor response to treatment and identify early relapse. 


 The process differs across countries, but the outcome is indefinitely similar. Nephrology is a subspecialty of general medicine. A nephrology/renal nurse will have to complete nursing school, a minimum of three years of practice as a general nurse, and a BSN (Bachelor’s of Science in Nursing) or post-basic course in renal subjects. Typically this training lasts 1-2 years. 

 Nurses in training for renal nursing often continue in the world of academia to obtain research degrees, putting a temporary halt to their clinical practice. Some also sub-specialize in dialysis, kidney transplantation, CKD, cancer-related kidney diseases, procedural nephrology or other non-nephrology areas. 

 However, only pediatric-trained nurses are allowed to train in pediatric nephrology, due to differences in physiology. 

 Work environment 

 A major task and responsibility for renal nurses are  administering treatments to patients.  Treatments can include medications, blood products, surgical interventions, renal replacement therapy and plasma exchange. Kidney problems can have a significant impact on quality and length of life, and so psychological support, health education and advanced care planning play key roles in nephrology. 

 Renal nurses often find themselves having a better work setting compared to their non-specialized counterparts. Schedules are less erratic, especially for nurses working in dialysis support roles. 

 On average, renal nurses with post basic certification get  about 10% more pay.  

 Career opportunities 

	 Dialysis centers (out- and in-patient) 
	 Nephrology wards 
	 Transplant units 
	 Home care 
	 Medical device industry 
	 Pharmaceutical industry 
	 Government and nonprofit healthcare settings (eg:  NKF ) 
	 Community clinics 

 There is a severe shortage of nephrology nurses in Malaysia. 

 Search for high-paying job in renal nursing at  MIMS Career . MIMS Career is a premier, healthcare-focused job portal site for Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines and Indonesia. Our simple sign-up process allows you to easily apply for jobs you might be interested in with a single click. Job locations include hospitals, nursing homes, and private practices. It’s free, easy to use, and safe. 

 Can’t find what you’re looking for? Set up a job alert and we’ll notify you by email whenever positions that suit your preferences are available. All of our pages are mobile-responsive, so you can take your applications with you on the go. 

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 How do we define a great nurse? Is it one that fully accomplishes his/her tasks? Completes her shifts well without any issues? 

 Great nurses are those who alleviate suffering and heal the body, mind, and soul. 


 Compassion is the feeling of concern and sympathy for others. 

 The word compassion literally means to “suffer together.” It arises when a person sees another suffering, and feels a deep desire to relieve the said suffering. It is a central tenet of nursing; the very mature of the work originates from the compassion of individuals to relieve suffering and pain. 

 A compassionate nurse will always do what is right for her patients. In times of fatigue, tiredness, or exhaustion, compassion for that patient will drive this nurse to trudge onwards and do her job. 

  On developing compassion:  

 Make it a daily practice: Think about it in the morning during rounds. At night during late shifts. When you talk to patients. It is a simple philosophy of kindness. 
 If you’re finding it hard to develop compassion in your nursing life, remind yourself that everyone you meet is seeking happiness, avoiding suffering, has lost something, and is learning about what it means to be human. 
 Think about a person you know who’s recently suffering. Imagine if the suffering happened to you. Now imagine if there is another person who realizes your situation and is trying her very best to make you feel better. You would appreciate that a lot. 
 This helps you develop the feeling of wanting to relieve others’ suffering, which is the definition of compassion. 

 Compassion has many benefits: it has been proven that compassionate people produce 23% less cortisol, the “stress” hormone. 


 The ability to understand and share the feelings of another. 

 Understanding the feelings of patients is crucial to their recovery. 

 It does not mean you completely understand what they are going through. It also does not mean you agree with everything they are feeling. 

 It means that you are willing to make a voluntary effort to listen to them and understand their challenges. 

 It is shown that patients are more receptive to treatments when they feel that their caregivers understand their situation. 

  On developing empathy:  

 It needs to be done without judgement. 
 Everyone has a different set of values. Two similar patients can have completely different challenges. 
 Understand what they are fighting against, and what they are fearful of. Use it to better develop a relationship with your patient, so he/she may continue to recover holistically. 


 The ability to think less about ourselves, and more about other people. Nurses need this trait, mostly for their own benefit over the patient’s. 

 Being selfless means to give to others at the expense of their own selves. By being selfless, it makes working the stressful nursing life a lot better. 

 Some nurses miss their lunches just to hold their patient’s hand. Some stay up the night to make sure their patient manages to live through it. 

 The reason why these kind of nurses are great is that they would do it all over again. For many more years to come. They also have to. Selflessness prevents these nurses from burning out on their work by caring for others more. 

  On developing selflessness:  

 Take pleasure in the happiness of your patients. 
 Don’t hurt another person for the sake of hurting them. 
 Watch your selfish thoughts; like when a patient irritates you, threatens you, you get the idea. That kind of thinking gets in the way of compassion as well. 

  Good communicator  

 Not only will you be needing to administer IVs, triage patients in the ER, or carry out CPR, you will also need to be dealing with your patients as humans. 

 There are instances where you will have to help patients and their relatives to understand their medical situation, in a comprehensible way. 

 Moreover, you will need to deal with your superiors, and sometimes you might not agree with what they would have you do. Being a solid communicator allows you to express those feelings of disagreement, and come to a favorable conclusion. 

 If deciding to go into teaching, being a great communicator is essential that you can impart your knowledge onto junior nurses effectively. 

  On developing communication skills:  

 Practice practice practice. Try to be as understandable as possible. It helps to realize what kind of patient or relative you’re talking to, their proficiency in the language you speak and their terminologies. 
 Some states of malaysia have a different colloquial grammar compared to the standard Bahasa. It helps to understand these nuances in language. Mirror their way of speaking and you’ll come off as more approachable. 
 Never EVER condescend someone else for not understanding what you were trying to tell them. More often than not it is the inability of the speaker to explain, not the inability of the listener to understand. 

  Possess mental fortitude  

 Some days are pleasant. Some are rewarding. 

 But some are difficult. Some are downright devastating, like when you lose a patient you cared for. 

 It is important not to let these things mentally incapacitate you, and compromise your ability to care for your patients. 

 It is okay to feel sad, angry, frustrated, or even shattered. We are all human. 

 Great nurses have the mental fortitude to weather these types of events. It might not be easy, but they still return to practise their art of healing. 

  On developing mental fortitude:  

 Identify the obstacle in your path. Is it a difficult patient? An angry relative? Death? 
 Understand how your emotions are making you react. Are you upset? Why? 
 Know that the obstacle can sometimes be the way. A difficult patient can teach you patience. An angry relative can teach you to deal with irrational people with stride. Death can teach you to be compassionate of other people’s loss. 

 Focus on making the obstacle that’s disturbing you. Ask yourself, “If I can’t solve this for myself, how can I make this better for othe people?” 

 Calm under pressure 

 Great nurses remain calm and composed under great duress. 

 Diamonds are forged under high pressure. Great nurses too, are like that; the do not cave under the load, they emerge stronger and better. 

 Being calm under pressure-filled situations allows you to perceive problems with better accuracy. It leads to better decision making, which can mean life or death for your patients. 

 Remain calm, and you will make better sense of things around you. 

  On developing mental calm:  

 The events that we see as negative all have a positive benefit that we can act on. A computer glitch that destroys your work in the hospital is now an opportunity to become two times better at your job because you’re going to do it twice. 
 Having a terrible supervisor in the wards is now an opportunity to learn from his/her faults while you fill up your resume and look for better opportunities elsewhere.  
Being mentally calm is seeing through the negative, past its underside and through to the positive. 

 Lifelong learner 

 A carpenter is only as good as the tools he is given. 

 Same thing applies to a nurse. However, in this case, the tools to a nurse are her knowledge and skillset. 

 A diverse skillset will make you valuable at a lot of situations. 

 A deep understanding of a certain skillset will make you highly valued at that field. 

 Whatever it is, learning new things and constantly studying to make yourself better is always a good idea. 

  On developing lifelong learning skills:  

 Develop a passion for the latest advancements in nursing policy, technology, and laws. The changes in those areas will ultimately affect the future of your work. 
 Have a career plan, and work towards getting the skills, certifications, or knowledge that you need to move on to the next stage of your career. 
 Follow great medical podcasts to listen to on your commute. 
 Subscribe to nursing-related journals and publications, and make it a point to read in your spare time. 


 It is said that in times that require greatness,  we do not rise to the occasion but we fall back on our training.  These habits may not be in you, but with deliberate and constant practice, you can cultivate these, and continue on your path of becoming not only a good nurse, but a great one. 

 Great nurses are always on the lookout for new, exciting, and better opportunities to grow their career. Find out your next employment with MIMS Career, a fast, secure, and convenient portal to connect you to top-class healthcare employers in MY, SG, ID, and PH.

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 Intensive care nursing 

 Intensive care nursing or critical care nursing is a branch of medicine concerned with the diagnosis and management of life-threatening conditions requiring sophisticated organ support and invasive monitoring. 


 Patients requiring intensive care may require support for instability, airway or respiratory compromise, acute renal failure, potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmias, or the cumulative effects of multiple organ failure. It is also commonly known now as multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. They may also be admitted for intensive or invasive monitoring, such as the crucial hours after major surgery when deemed too unstable to transfer to a less intenseively monitored unit. 

 Intensive care is usually only offered to those whose condition is potentially reversible and who have a good chance of surviving with intensive care support. A prime requisite for admission to an intensive care unit is that the underlying condition can be overcome. Patients with a non-overcomeable condition are not admitted into intensive care units (ICU). 

 ICUs are the most expensive area of nursing or medical care. It is also the most technologically advanced, requiring nurses with a higher level of qualifications and education than most. Telemetry, data-analysis, and surgical procedures are all part and parcel of the ICU nurse’s daily responsibilities. 

 Work Location 

ICU or Critical Care nurses are provisioned in a specialized unit of a hospital called the intensive care unit (ICU) or critical care unit (CCU). Many hospitals have also designated intensive care areas for certain specialties of medicine, such as: 

	 the coronary intensive unit for heart disease 
	 medical intensive care unit 
	 surgical intensive care unit 
	 pediatric intensive care unit 
	 neuroscience critical care unit 
	 overnight intensive recovery unit 
	 shock/trauma intensive care unit 
	 and more 

 The terminologies and nomenclature of these units may vary from hospital to hospital. They are also subject to funding, research capability, and availability of trained medical staff. 

 Equipment and systems in unit 

 In the ICU/CCU nurses are required to fundamentally understand and able to operate certain equipment and systems that are critical to the survival of the patient admitted. Common equipment in the unit includes mechanical ventilation to assist breathing through an endotracheal tube or a tracheotomy; hemofiltration equipment for acute renal failure; monitoring equipment; intravenous lines for drug insusions or total parenteral nutrition. 

 A wide array of drugs are also kept in the ICU/CCU, such as inotropes, sedatives, broad spectrum antibiotics and analgesics. 

 Work staff 

 Intensive care/critical care medicine is a relatively new but increasingly important medical specialty. The ICU/CCU is staffed by multidisciplinary and multiprofessional teams including nurses, respiratory therapists, physicians and critical care pharmacists. Doctors with training in intensive care are called intensivists; ICU/CCU nurses are a major form of support for this group. 


 ICU nurses will have completed a minimum of three years as a registered nurse following their nursing diploma or degree. Depending on the hospital, ICU nurses may have opted to do a BSN or MSN in order to develop the critical thinking skills required of medical staff in a such a high dependency ward. 

 A post-basic certification in ICU care is commonly around the duration of 12-24 months, where nurses in training will cover internal medicine, pediatrics, anesthesiology, surgery, and emergency medicine. 

 Nurses may also pursue additional education and training in critical care medicine leading to certification by bodies such as the American Association of Critical Care Nurses. This certification carries a lot of weight in terms of qualification for those seeking career advancement. 

 ICU/CCU nurses choose to specialize in one or more of the nine key systems, which are: 

	 Cardiovascular system 
	 Central nervous system 
	 endocrine system 
	 respiratory system 

 Work Conditions 

 Common tasks and responsibilities 

  Hypoxemic Respiratory Failure 
The primary aim in treatment of this kind of failure is maintenance of adequate oxygenation, while limiting ventilator-induced lung injury and oxygen toxicity. 

  Assist Patients to Wean Off Mechanical Ventilation 
Weaning is the process of gradual withdrawal of mechanical ventilation. The process is uneventful in most patients, but may take up half the time on a ventilator in problematic patients. Nurses are to assess the readiness of patient to wean using clinical and objective measures, and moderate weaning failure on difficult-to-wean patients. 

  Inotropic and Vasopressor Support for Hypotensive Patients 
This treatment aims to maintain a perfusion pressure necessary for tissue oxygenation in patients with hypotension and inadequate tissue perfusion. Tasks are to correct hypovolemia, titrate doses of inotropes and vasopressors to targeted levels, monitoring of blood pressure via the arterial line, and prevent septic shock. 

  Feeding via Enteral or Parenteral Methods 
In ICU care, nutritional therapy is plays an important part. The goal is to provide adequate calories and protein to keep up with ongoing losses, prevent or correct nutrient deficiencies and promote wound healing and immune function. 

 Work Opportunities 

  Search for high-paying ICU/CCU nursing jobs  on  MIMS Career . Browse, save, and apply for nursing jobs, all in one-click. Take the opportunity for higher pay and better work locations. Our pages are all mobile-responsive, allowing you to take that leap for a better job whenever, wherever you are. All our job postings are  heavily screened to prevent scams and mistrustful behavior.  

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