Top 5 Fake Medical Practitioners

A few weeks back Malaysians were shocked to hear of a man impersonating a medical officer at a hospital in Alor Setar. What was impressive was that the man kept the act up for about a year before authorities caught him!

There have been many cases of people impersonating doctors or surgeons for all kinds of reasons. These are some of the most interesting throughout recent history.

1. Kristina Ross

image here

Fake profession: Plastic Surgeon

Kristina Ross frequented bars and pubs, claiming to be a plastic surgeon. She’d approach unsuspecting women, sweet-talk them and get them to know about her “private practice.” Under the guise of a plastic surgeon, she would conduct “breast examinations” on these women, and have them contact her number.

Her years of fake activities was brought to a halt when two recipients of her “free breast examinations” contacted the number Ross gave. The number belonged to a real plastic surgery clinic, but had no surgeon that went by the name of Kristina Ross. Their suspicions of the phony surgeon grew, so they called the police.

The authorities launched an investigated, and arrested Ross sometime later. But that’s not the last part of the story; upon arrest, it was discovered that she was actually a transgender man who changed his sex.

Bottomline: don’t subjugate yourselves to medical exams in non-clinical settings.

2. Francisco Rendon

image here

Fake profession: Dentist

Rendon was able to practice his own twisted brand of dentistry for about 16 months before the police finally caught on.

His dental clinic was situated between two automobile workshops. His patients grew wary of his dental credentials as they had to sit in a leather office seat instead of a reclining chair.

Hygiene was not maintained well; Rendon made his patients spit into a trash can rather than a proper sink. He used unlicensed tools, including a tool which purpose was to polish cars on his patients.

When the authorities came to his “office” to arrest him for practicing without a license, he still had many patients in the waiting room.

3. Keith Allen Barton

keith

Fake profession: Doctor

This lying physician claimed that he could cure serious diseases like HIV and cancer. He claimed he could “stop the diseases before they spread” and “nip it off from the bud.” He spread lies about the pharmaceutical industry, propagating the myth that corporations were hiding the real cure to those diseases.

In reality, what he did was charge his patients exorbitant fees for his homemade cures. Most of his remedies were made of cheap ingredients and did nothing to improve patients’ conditions. Sometimes he even made it worse.

He shares the same name as a registered doctor in California, and used this fact to swerve past the authorities. He was finally arrested under charges of identity theft and grand theft.

4. William Hamman

picture here

Fake profession: Cardiologist and Medical Speaker

Everybody liked him; he flew commercial planes for a living, and was also a cardiologist with 15 years of experience at the side. He frequently published papers in academic journals. He went around delivering lectures at universities and Cardiology seminars.

One day he submitted an early draft to a university committee that oversaw publication for their medical journal. One staff member spotted a glaring flaw in the otherwise impeccable paper; he had no M.D. (medical doctor) qualification.

What makes Hamman so interesting is that his academic achievements as a fake cardiologist were particularly impressive. His focus was on team-based efforts and how to get cardiology teams to work better together to improve outcomes. It had real academic weight to it.

5. William Bailey

bailey

Fake profession: Doctor

Bailey was an eccentric man. Being born in the late 1800s, when radioactivity was still a poorly understood science, he was obsessed in marketing the health benefits of consuming radioactive substances for the masses.

In 1918, he released Radithor; a tonic that he claimed could cure diseases and restore health by stimulating the endocrine glands. Of course, there was no scientific basis to this. Radithor was made by adding radium crystals into water. It gave off an emission of 1 microcurie per mole of Ra.

Despite not being proven to be effective, the public lapped up Bailey’s bogus claims of the healing properties of Radithor. Eben Byers, a young Pennsylvanian competitive golf player, was urged to take the irradiated substance after a consultation with his doctor. He was suffering from pains in his side; so he bought and drank Radithor on a daily basis.

Byers died in 1932. He had holes in his skull due to radiation poisoning; his jaw even fell off as it degenerated. He had to be buried in a lead coffin to contain the radioactivity from his body.

Bailey died after the Second World War, after having suffered from multiple cancers and poisoning.


Source:

  1. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1330725/Kristina-Ross-pretended-plastic-surgeon-conduct-bar-room-breast-exams.html
  2. http://www.nbcchicago.com/news/local/francisco-rendon-fake-dentistry-charges-91216374.html
  3. http://www.nbcsandiego.com/news/local/Phony-Doctor-Keith-Barton-Claimed-He-Could-Cure-HIV-Cancer-DA-186240712.html
  4. http://abcnews.go.com/Health/MindMoodNews/fake-cardiologist-william-hamman-duped-real-doctors/story?id=12395288
  5. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radithor


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 A close relative of mine is a young nurse. Two years ago she started taking care of this nice lady who was partially paralysed; her breathing muscles would no longer function autonomously, hence a tracheostomy was done so she could breathe. The condition left her bed-ridden on bad days, and wheel-chair bound on good ones. 

 She cared for the lady to the best of her abilities, for about 18 months. One day the lady started feeling cold. She was sweating and shivering at the same time. She went unconscious, and had five cardiac arrests within 36 hours. 

 After unsuccessfully trying to stabilize her blood pressure, she died of heart failure. The young nurse was devastated. It wasn’t her own mother, but it might as well seemed like it. It was her first patient death while working as a nurse. It affected her so much she found it difficult to work for the next week. 

 This experience is shared by many nurses in the country. How nurses bond with their patients depends on circumstances and the length of time they provided care to them. A strong bond between patient and nurse is essential to effective nursing, but when death happens, it can deal a very significant blow. 

 The first death of your patient can massively impact you as a nurse. So will subsequent ones. 

 It is extremely important that this doesn’t mentally compromise your ability to do your work. 

 How can you, as a nurse, deal with it? 

 1. It’s okay to feel emotions. Embrace it fully. 

 You are human. You are in a compassionate profession: the very basis of nursing started on the principle to relieve pain, assuage suffering, and provide help to those of ailing health. 

 It is okay to feel overwhelmed at first, especially when you have cared for the patient for so long. 

 Empathy is good for your job, it makes you a better nurse, but it makes loss more painful. 

 Allow yourself some time to feel, and understand your emotions. 

 Your line of work is to care for people, the noblest of all human traits. Your grief on the death of your patient means that you have done your job. 

 2. Try to accept the death happened. 

 Some wards have it harder than others for this. 

 A geriatric ward would have the oldest, most needy patients. Conducting CPR on these patients can be cruel, especially if you or your team are not willing to “let go” of the patient. 

 However, death in these parts of the hospital would be a routine part of the day. It is wise to accept it, so you can continue giving out the best care to the other still-living patients without letting it affect the quality of your work. 

 Accept their deaths, and the fact that you have done all you could to alleviate their suffering. Know that you have done your best to keep them comfortable and retain their dignity. 

 3. Remain in control and neutral if breaking the news to the family. Don’t add to the problem. 

 It is okay to share your emotions with the patient’s loved ones. 

 Respect the family; if they do not wish you to partake in their grief, then kindly leave them alone. They have also gone through much, just like you. 

 Some relatives will blame the doctor/nurse for causing the death. Don’t take this to heart. The Kubler-Ross model of grief lays out five stages, and anger is one of them. 
Find your own ways to vent, either through support groups, family, or colleagues. 

 4. Talk about it. Don’t bottle it in. 

 One of the best things about being in the nursing workforce is that you’re surrounded by people who have gone through similar experiences too. 

 Death is prevalent amongst healthcare professions, and sometimes just talking to a senior can help a lot. 

 Find someone you’re comfortable with. It can be a senior nurse, a matron, or even your other colleagues in the ward. 

 Ask them how they managed to overcome such periods of distress. Pour out whatever you’re feeling to them; it is very likely that they have felt everything you are feeling right now. 

 Talking about it helps you make sense of what you’re feeling. By articulating it into words, you can pinpoint exactly what’s bothering you, and help you to come to terms. 

 5. Realize that these things happen. 

 Things happen. Death is part and parcel of the life in a hospital. Some areas will be more prone to dealing with death than others, like the ER, surgical ward, the ICU. 
You might find yourself poring over the moments that led up to the death in your mind, going over what you could have done better, what you could have done differently. 

 This leads to a general feeling of guilt. This can be very destructive to your well-being, and can affect the performance of your work to other patient who also need your care. This is not a good coping mechanism if it jeopardizes the health of your other patients. 

 6. Believe that you are making a difference. 

 The death of a patient does not equal to failure. 

 How you deal with the patient’s relatives is an extension of how you treated their late relative. 

 For all the grief that you may be feeling right now, the patient’s family has it harder. 

 Showing that you cared provides a monumental difference, and leads the family to a safer path of acceptance. 

 Conclusion 

 The trait that sets humans apart from other species is our ability to empathize for our fellow brethren. 

 Other fauna have demonstrated this to a certain degree, but only humans have been able to take it to their very core, make it into their reason to live, and deliver it back to their community. 

 Nursing is more than just facts or skills or the amount of certifications that you can obtain to move your career. It is founded on empathy; the ability to understand others’ suffering and pain. 

 During times when you feel overwhelmed or devastated by the loss of your patient, stand firm and be proud of who you are, because nurses do things that not many will have the capacity to accomplish. 

 You will find your way to deal with it as you become more experienced, and become better at learning what is the best way to help families cope with grief over time. 

 Steel your heart, adjust that uniform, and carry on providing the best that you can give to your other patients.

How to Cope with Death and Loss, as A Nurse

A close relative of mine is a young nurse. Two years ago she started taking care of this nice lady who was partially paralysed; her breathing muscles would no longer function autonomously, hence a tracheostomy was done so she could breathe. The...

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 Emergency Nursing 

 Emergency medicine, formerly known in some countries as accident and emergency medicine (A&E), is the medical specialty involving care for  undifferentiated and unscheduled patients with illnesses or injuries requiring immediate medical attention.  

 Overview 

 As first-line providers, emergency nurses and doctors are responsible for: 

 
	 initiating investigations and interventions to diagnose and/or treat patients in the acute phase 
	 coordinating care with doctors from other specialties 
	 making decisions regarding a patient’s need for hospital admission, observation, or discharge. 
 

 Emergency nurses generally practice in hospital emergency departments, wards, units or intensive care units. They may also be working at pre-hospital settings via emergency medical services, such as in the event of a calamity like a road accident. Moreover, emergency nurses also may work in primary care, such as urgent care clinics. 

 History 

 During the 18th century the French Revolution brought upon the development of the ambulance. After seeing the speed with which the carriages f the French flying artillery maneuvered across the battlefields, French military surgeon Dominique Jean Larrey applied the idea for rapid transport of wounded soldiers to a central place where healthcare was accessible. 

 Emergency medicine and nursing is a relatively new field. It was only in 1979 that a vote by the American Board of Medical Specialties that emergency medicine became a recognized medical specialty in the United States. Other countries followed suit soon thereafter. 

 Scope of Work 

 Emergency nursing is a specialization based on the knowledge and skills for the prevention, diagnosis and management of acute and urgent aspects of illness and injury affecting patients of all age groups with a full spectrum of undifferentiated physical and behavioral disorders. 

 It further encompasses an understanding of the development of pre-hospital and in-hospital emergency medical systems and the skills necessary for this development. 

 Common Tasks 

 
	 Triaging of patients 
	 Suture complex lacerations 
	 reduce a fractured bone or dislocated joint 
	 treat a heart attack 
	 manage strokes 
	 stop severe nosebleeds 
	 placing a chest tube 
	 conducting emergency tracheostomy 
 

 Work location 

 Emergency nurses are tasked to provide the acute care of internal medical and surgical conditions. In many emergency departments, nurses are tasked with seeing an alarmingly large number of patients, treating their illnesses and arranging their next steps. 

 Training 

 There are a variety of models for emergency nursing training across the globe. In some countries the emergency nurse rides in the ambulance to and fro the scene of emergency. This is done to provide stabilizing care to the affected patient. 

 Nurses in emergency departments require a broad field of knowledge and advanced procedural skills of many nursing fields. They must know how to: 

 
	 Resuscitate a patient 
	 Carry out surgical procedures 
	 provide cardiac life support 
	 Manage patients’ airways 
 

 Specialization for emergency nursing often happens after a post-basic certification proceeding three years of service as a registered nurse. 

 Required skillset 

 Emergency nurses require an extensive amount of cool-headedness to handle the oncoming onslaught of daily tasks that present themselves. A great number of emergency ward cases are urgent and time-sensitive in nature, therefore the nurse needs to exercise great caution and patient, while being curt and efficient at the same time. 

 Good teamworking skills is essential. The role of an emergency nurse also involves proper triaging of patients into in- or out-patient services, and work with various specialists or fields to determine the best course of action following prognosis. A positive, proactive, and supportive nurse is beneficial in any emergency setting. 

 Clear communication skills are required in order to convey the correct information to emergency dispatchers or hospital emergency personnel. Failure in conveying correct medical info will prove to be disastrous for the patient, incur financial losses, and increase chances of litigation due to malpractice. 

 Career opportunities 

 Emergency nurses can work in a wide variety of settings, and they include: 

 
	 First aid volunteers 
	 Emergency medical services (BOMBA, paramedics) 
	 paediatric emergency medicine 
	 rescue squads 
	 emergency medical technician 
	 traumatology 
 

 It is not uncommon for nurses to leave clinical work in order to focus on research, especially at the post-graduate levels of study. 

 Search for high-paying nursing jobs on  MIMS Career . Browse, save, and apply for nursing jobs, all in one-click. Take the opportunity for higher pay and better work locations. Our pages are all mobile-responsive, allowing you to take that leap for a better job whenever, wherever you are. All our job postings are  heavily screened to prevent scams and mistrustful behavior.  
   

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Career Highlight: Emergency Nursing

Emergency Nursing Emergency medicine, formerly known in some countries as accident and emergency medicine (A&E), is the medical specialty involving care for undifferentiated and unscheduled patients with illnesses or injuries...

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 For those nurses serving with  Kementrian Kesihatan Malaysia  (KKM), the start of your work life will present you with one of the toughest choices you’ll make: 

 
 EPF (Employees’ Provident Fund, also known as KWSP), or choose the pension fund? 
 

 Both are viable options in securing your financial health after you retire. Although retirement might seem like ages away, a good amount of planning and successful investments can mean the difference between being able to live comfortably in your golden years, or struggle with daily or medical expenses. 

 So which to choose? We’ll break down the points below. 

 Pension fund 

  What is it?  
It’s a monthly stipend of a set amount, provided by the Public Services Department upon your retirement. In addition to that, you also receive a  gratuity  payment, and medical/health benefits. 

  Calculation  
Here we will be assuming that you start work at 20 years old, with a starting salary of RM2,000, and continue working until you retire at 55 with a salary of RM5,600 (3% annual pay increase). 

 Your monthly pension will be your last drawn salary, divided by two. For example, if your base salary is RM5,000 when you retire, your monthly stipend will be RM2,800/mo. 

 In addition to that, you will receive gratuity payment, which is calculated as such: 

 
 gratuity = 7.5% x 35yrs x 12 months x RM5,600 (final drawn salary) 
= RM 176,400. 
 

 RM176,400 will be given as a lump sum, while RM2,800 will be given per month. Again, this is all assuming you retire at 55, with a final salary of RM5,600. 

  Benefits  

 
	 No subtraction from base pay. 
 

 Unlike EPF, as we will see later, there is no subtraction from your base salary. 

 
	 Guaranteed monthly retirement funding 
 

 Again, unlike EPF, where your money can be withdrawn for other uses, pension takers are guaranteed to have a monthly source of income. 

  Disadvantages  

 
	 You have to start and end your service in the public/government sector. It might hamper your ability to seek work overseas, better base salaries, or even some chances to study. 
 

 EPF or Employees Provident Fund (KWSP - Kumpulan Simpanan Wang Pekerja) 

  What is it?  
EPF is the accumulation of savings generated from deductions of your base salary. Currently, you can choose either 11%, or 8%, as  recently announced . 

 This accumulation of money is further grown by annual dividends. On average the dividend is around 6%, depending on the GDP (gross domestic product) of the country. 

 What makes EPF great as long term savings is due to the magic of  compound interest. . Your employer also contributes to your fund (12% of your pay). These two things make an EPF account grow substantially when properly managed. 

  2 accounts  

 Your EPF savings are divided into two accounts. 70% goes into account 1, and the rest to account 2. Account 1 is your retirement funds. Account 2 is withdrawable, under a few conditions: 

 
	 more than 50 years old 
	 Housing downpayment for your 1st house 
	 housing loan payment 
	 education 
	 medical costs 
	 Hajj pilgrimage 
 

 Upon reaching the age of 55, you will be able to withdraw from account 1. You will have to choose to withdraw one lump sum, or as a monthly stipend like a pension. 

  Calculation  

 Let’s take the same example as just now. Start work at 20, salary RM2,000, retire at 55, salary RM5,000. 

 
 Deduction from pay = 11% = RM220 
Employer contribution = 12% = RM240 
 We will assume no withdrawals are made over entire working period  
EPF annual dividend = 6% 
 

 The interest adds up year over year, and with the help of EPF’s  online calculator , 

 Total EPF savings at 55 years old = RM461,900 

 It is a marginally higher amount than RM176,400 gratuity you will receive from a pension. 

  Benefits  

 
	 Flexibility. At the age of 55, you can withdraw that money and invest in another scheme, venture, or fund that offers greater returns. 
	 Faster growth. As shown, even with a contribution of 11% of your pay, over the course of 35 years it balloons into a large amount of money. 
	 Freedom of employment. You no longer have to work within the constraints of the government or public service. You are free to pursue study or work opportunities as you wish. 
 

  Disadvantages  

 
	 Sometimes things don’t go as planned. You might hit a financial roadblock that forces you to withdraw from your EPF fund. An example of this is a medical emergency. 
	 It subtracts 11% of your base salary. 11% might not seem like much, but for people who live paycheck to paycheck, it can be a bitter pill to swallow. 
	 Annual dividend from EPF can decrease, depending on economic climate. 
 

 Making a comparison 

 Monthly funds 

 Assuming that you live until the mean life expectancy age in Malaysia, which is 76 years old. 

 
 Years to live off retirement fund (pension) = 76-55 = 21 years 
 

 To make a fair comparison, let’s subtract the gratuity amount of a pension scheme from the lump sum of EPF savings. 

 
 EPF at 55 years old - gratuity of pension at 55 years old = RM461,900 - RM176,400 = RM285,500 

 Stipend per month that EPF provides = RM285,500 / 21 years / 12 months = RM1,132.94/month 
 

 Even if we did not subtract the gratuity value, it would be: 

 
 RM461,900 / 21 years / 12 months = RM1,832.94/ month 
 

  It is far less than RM2,600/month from a pension scheme . 

 What if we invest all of EPF savings? 

 Say at the age of 55, you embark on another investment with better returns. We will assume 8%. You pile up all your savings into it. 

 Investment return x EPF savings = 8% x RM 461,900 = RM36,952/year or RM3,079.33/month. 

  It is more than what you’ll obtain from a pension.  However you’ll need to ensure that the second investment has better returns than EPF dividends. That in itself can sometimes be a challenge. 

 Conclusion 

 They both have their advantages and drawbacks. It seems like it is up to you to play it well, to ensure you can lead a comfortable life upon retirement. 

 However the main question of choosing either EPF or pension as retirement savings often boils down to your choice of employer. 

 Will you stay with the government sector for another 30+ years? You don’t want to end up with no retirement fund… No EPF or no pension. That’d be the worst. 

 If yes, go for the pension scheme. It is safe, guaranteed, and offers great peace of mind in your golden years. 

 However, with EPF, you are free to take up opportunities that come your way. Countries like Saudi Arabia, Singapore, and Australia are actively seeking out Malaysian nurses with extremely attractive pay. Opportunities for post-graduate education are more limited in the government sector; if in private, you get to choose when you want to do it. You can also fund it with your EPF savings, something you can’t do on a pension. 

 Choose the freedom of choice. Search for high-paying nursing jobs, and overseas jobs on MIMS Career. Browse, save, and apply for nursing jobs, all in one-click. Take the opportunity for higher pay and better work locations. Our pages are all mobile-responsive, allowing you to take that leap for a better job whenever, wherever you are. All our job postings are heavily screened to prevent scams and mistrustful behavior. 
   

 
 Our Most Popular Articles 

  Think About These 5 Things Before You Decide On A Specialization  

  5 Things Nurses Need To Know To Be Paid More  

  10 Ways Malaysian Nurses Can Increase Their Income

EPF (KWSP), or Pension? Which to choose?

For those nurses serving with Kementrian Kesihatan Malaysia (KKM), the start of your work life will present you with one of the toughest choices you’ll make: EPF (Employees’ Provident Fund, also known as KWSP), or choose...

Read More