4 Things To Know About Scam Job Offers

  1. See if the offer is too good to be true
  2. There is a fee to be paid to "process" your employment
  3. You get the job right away
  4. Unprofessional job interviews

Job scams

In 2013, a South African registered nurse was approached by a man outside the hospital she worked in. The 25-year old man was a recruitment agent for the KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) Department of Health. He offered her a job at another institution, for better pay and work hours.

The nurse saw this as a great opportunity. She accepted it, and he produced a contract and offered her the job. Then he requested USD220 in cash for the job.

Thankfully, the nurse grew suspicious, and realized she was being scammed. She immediately alerted hospital staff who arrested the man.

Grey's Hospital, where the incident happened.

Grey's Hospital, where the incident happened.

That could have ended a lot worse. Luckily in that nurse's case, she was able to spot the scam job offer. It is hoped that this post can help you to spot these harmful acts and avoid costing you your precious time, money, and dignity. Scammers know that finding a job can be tough, and they trick people by advertising where real employers do.

Scams are endlessly creative! This list might not encompass all of them, but it will help you in detecting these harmful job scams.


1. See If The Offer Is Too Good To Be True

If it seems like you’ve landed yourself the best offer in the world, DON’T. The hiring managers will say something to you like:

You can earn as much as you want, there is no upper limit on your salary. You decide what you earn. You can earn USD5,000 in one week by working at home!

Run away as fast as you can. These scams like to prey on those desperate for a new job. They take advantage of your desperation by having you excited of their offer. Once they’ve gotten you on their hook, those “employers” can start to demand money, information, and time, just to get your application moving.

Watch out for:

2. There is a fee to be paid to "process" your employment

insert image about money

If the hiring manager contacts you again and informs you that you have to pay [insert amount here] to complete your application, forget it.

You might see overseas job offers requiring you to pay a few hundred dollars to "process" your application. They'll claim it's to secure your employment. To sweeten the deal, some of them claim that you'll get back the money within days after you get in the company/institution.

Here are the most common ways job scams use to cheat your money, like:

Job scammers make all kinds of promises about your chances of employment, and an astounding amount of them require you to pay them for their services to employ you. It's important to note that the promise of a job is not the same thing as a job. If you have to pay for that promise, it's most definitely a scam.

3. You get the job right away

You get the job, without much interviewing, or even applying through anything. The "offer" gets sent to your inbox. They often mention that they got your email from Jobstreet, CareerBuilder, or LinkedIn.

Most of the time, these job offers are sent with emails that are similar to emails of legitimate employers. Be careful!

Imagine if a David Chen from Ramsay Sime Darby emailed you about a sweet job offer. If he really worked at RSD, his email would be something like david.c@simedarby.com. Watch out for david.c.simedarby@gmail.com, david.c@gmail.com, david.chen.HR.simedarby@yahoo.com, etc.

When in doubt, call up the company and ask for that employee!

A real company would want to talk to a candidate before hiring him or her.

4. Unprofessional job interviews

unprofessional job interview

Look out for interviews online, such as over Facebook Messenger. Worse still, are interviews using a software that the scammer asks you to install on you computer. You will risk having your computer infected with harmful malware that can record what you type , activate your webcam without notifying you, and hold your personal information as ransom.

Look out for interviewers with bad grammar or spelling. If it doesn't seem like what a real professional company would say, don't trust it.


With some common sense, and a bit of suspicion, you can easily spot scam job offers. The rule of thumb is that if it looks too good to be true, sounds too good to be true, and seems to good to be true, then it's definitely not true. Also look out for shady characters and language.

As mentioned above, there is no limit to the creativity of these scam artists and their job offers. The tips mentioned above might cover ALL the scam job methods out there, but at least you'll be better prepared, and more aware that these things can happen.

As a healthcare-focused job portal site, MIMS Career takes the legitimacy of any employer and job posting very seriously. We screen employers thoroughly, contacting them at various levels, to determine authenticity of said employers. Our privacy policy also dictates that we never share your personal information to unrelated third parties, nor do we sell them.

The next time you're in search of a job, apply through MIMS Career. Sign up, fill in your details, and apply for job vacancies from top healthcare institutions in Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, and the Philippines with one click.

Browse through our extensive database of job postings, updated daily. Our pages are mobile-responsive, so you can save jobs you're interested in on your desktop, and continue reading about it and apply later on your phone.

Can't find what you're looking for? Set a job alert, and we'll notify you once a job with your preferences is made available. Sign up now with MIMS Career. It's fast, convenient, and secure. We do the hard work of verifying scam jobs so you won't have to.

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 Recently there’s been talk about the Malaysian Nursing Board phasing out the Diploma in Nursing programme. As a result, soon all future nursing students that want to practice the profession in the country has to complete a four-year degree (Bachelor of Science in Nursing). 

 Many parties have been very vocal about this, citing that many nurses cannot afford the extra costs it takes to study for four years instead of the usual two for a diploma. Some students get into nursing for that reason; it offers a quick pathway to work in a respectable profession, without the added burden of a pre-university programme after completion of secondary school. 

 While I understand that some nurses have to support their families ASAP, I’m here to argue that there is a hidden benefit to all nurses being required to do their degree in order to be registered practitioners. 

 That benefit is the extra 2-4 years of age that nurses have upon graduation. 

 Older… Wiser? 

 A few days ago there was news of a 19-year old girl who will become the  youngest medical doctor in Malaysia  this year. The prodigy completed her secondary education at the age of 14, enrolling straight into an Australian pre-U programme, followed by medical school. 

 While I applaud her achievements (it is nothing to make light of), for the rest of us entering the healthcare workforce at 19 is not the best of ideas. 

 A doctor fresh out of medical school at the age of 25 is six years older than 19, and will have six years of extra life experiences that will make him or her relate better to patients. 

 The healthcare line, as we all know, is riddled with a lot of challenges and difficulties that are difficult to teach in training colleges. There are unexpected obstacles from patients, their relatives, and colleagues that are difficult to circumnavigate without emotional maturity. When these are not handled well they lead to burnouts and depression. 

 Forcing the degree programme for nurses rather than diploma grants student nurses extra time to prepare themselves. Most of the time, maturity comes with age. Being a nurse (or a doctor for that matter) is an arduous endeavor in itself. There will be times when you have to react to difficult situations requiring you to make a choice. Maturity grants the wisdom to make the right ones. 

 
 The healthcare line, as we all know, is riddled with a lot of challenges and difficulties that are difficult to teach in training colleges. 
 

 Being sure about oneself 

 As a patient, you would want nurses or doctors who are sure of themselves for your treatment. You want those who believe in what they do and believe in the importance of their work. Not the reluctant ones. 

 It is common for healthcare practitioners to leave the profession within the first 5 years of working. An extra few years of study provides the extra time to contemplate on whether this career path is really for them or not. This creates better rounded nurses and doctors. 

 Better clinicians 

 Better rounded nurses and doctors, who can find the balance between their personal growth and career, make for better clinicians. They are more likely to innovate and push medicine forward. This is why countries like the US and Sweden require prospective medical school students to have a Bachelor’s degree beforehand. These countries have the most number of medical innovations in history. 

 Removal of bad habits 

 
 Better rounded nurses and doctors make for better clinicians. 
 

 For nurses, making BSN degrees mandatory in order to be registered means an addition 4-5 years of study; 1-2 years for a pre-university course (like STPM) and another 4 years for the degree. Contrast this with immediately hopping on the diploma programme for two years after school. 

 The work involved to obtain a degree is very hard. It can only be done by being mentally sound, organized, and effective. These habits are not necessarily attained in school. 

 An older nursing graduate has more time to become a better, organized person; to know her strong points, faults, breaking points, things she cannot do, and learn how to deal with them knowing that a harder road lies ahead.

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 How do we define a great nurse? Is it one that fully accomplishes his/her tasks? Completes her shifts well without any issues? 

 Great nurses are those who alleviate suffering and heal the body, mind, and soul. 



 Compassion 

 Compassion is the feeling of concern and sympathy for others. 

 The word compassion literally means to “suffer together.” It arises when a person sees another suffering, and feels a deep desire to relieve the said suffering. It is a central tenet of nursing; the very mature of the work originates from the compassion of individuals to relieve suffering and pain. 

 A compassionate nurse will always do what is right for her patients. In times of fatigue, tiredness, or exhaustion, compassion for that patient will drive this nurse to trudge onwards and do her job. 

  On developing compassion:  

 
 Make it a daily practice: Think about it in the morning during rounds. At night during late shifts. When you talk to patients. It is a simple philosophy of kindness. 
 If you’re finding it hard to develop compassion in your nursing life, remind yourself that everyone you meet is seeking happiness, avoiding suffering, has lost something, and is learning about what it means to be human. 
 Think about a person you know who’s recently suffering. Imagine if the suffering happened to you. Now imagine if there is another person who realizes your situation and is trying her very best to make you feel better. You would appreciate that a lot. 
 This helps you develop the feeling of wanting to relieve others’ suffering, which is the definition of compassion. 
 

 Compassion has many benefits: it has been proven that compassionate people produce 23% less cortisol, the “stress” hormone. 

 Empathy: 

 The ability to understand and share the feelings of another. 

 Understanding the feelings of patients is crucial to their recovery. 

 It does not mean you completely understand what they are going through. It also does not mean you agree with everything they are feeling. 

 It means that you are willing to make a voluntary effort to listen to them and understand their challenges. 

 It is shown that patients are more receptive to treatments when they feel that their caregivers understand their situation. 

  On developing empathy:  

 
 It needs to be done without judgement. 
 Everyone has a different set of values. Two similar patients can have completely different challenges. 
 Understand what they are fighting against, and what they are fearful of. Use it to better develop a relationship with your patient, so he/she may continue to recover holistically. 
 



 Selflessness 

 The ability to think less about ourselves, and more about other people. Nurses need this trait, mostly for their own benefit over the patient’s. 

 Being selfless means to give to others at the expense of their own selves. By being selfless, it makes working the stressful nursing life a lot better. 

 Some nurses miss their lunches just to hold their patient’s hand. Some stay up the night to make sure their patient manages to live through it. 

 The reason why these kind of nurses are great is that they would do it all over again. For many more years to come. They also have to. Selflessness prevents these nurses from burning out on their work by caring for others more. 

  On developing selflessness:  

 
 Take pleasure in the happiness of your patients. 
 Don’t hurt another person for the sake of hurting them. 
 Watch your selfish thoughts; like when a patient irritates you, threatens you, you get the idea. That kind of thinking gets in the way of compassion as well. 
 

  Good communicator  

 Not only will you be needing to administer IVs, triage patients in the ER, or carry out CPR, you will also need to be dealing with your patients as humans. 

 There are instances where you will have to help patients and their relatives to understand their medical situation, in a comprehensible way. 

 Moreover, you will need to deal with your superiors, and sometimes you might not agree with what they would have you do. Being a solid communicator allows you to express those feelings of disagreement, and come to a favorable conclusion. 

 If deciding to go into teaching, being a great communicator is essential that you can impart your knowledge onto junior nurses effectively. 

  On developing communication skills:  

 
 Practice practice practice. Try to be as understandable as possible. It helps to realize what kind of patient or relative you’re talking to, their proficiency in the language you speak and their terminologies. 
 Some states of malaysia have a different colloquial grammar compared to the standard Bahasa. It helps to understand these nuances in language. Mirror their way of speaking and you’ll come off as more approachable. 
 Never EVER condescend someone else for not understanding what you were trying to tell them. More often than not it is the inability of the speaker to explain, not the inability of the listener to understand. 
 

  Possess mental fortitude  

 Some days are pleasant. Some are rewarding. 

 But some are difficult. Some are downright devastating, like when you lose a patient you cared for. 

 It is important not to let these things mentally incapacitate you, and compromise your ability to care for your patients. 

 It is okay to feel sad, angry, frustrated, or even shattered. We are all human. 

 Great nurses have the mental fortitude to weather these types of events. It might not be easy, but they still return to practise their art of healing. 

  On developing mental fortitude:  

 
 Identify the obstacle in your path. Is it a difficult patient? An angry relative? Death? 
 Understand how your emotions are making you react. Are you upset? Why? 
 Know that the obstacle can sometimes be the way. A difficult patient can teach you patience. An angry relative can teach you to deal with irrational people with stride. Death can teach you to be compassionate of other people’s loss. 
 

 Focus on making the obstacle that’s disturbing you. Ask yourself, “If I can’t solve this for myself, how can I make this better for othe people?” 



 Calm under pressure 

 Great nurses remain calm and composed under great duress. 

 Diamonds are forged under high pressure. Great nurses too, are like that; the do not cave under the load, they emerge stronger and better. 

 Being calm under pressure-filled situations allows you to perceive problems with better accuracy. It leads to better decision making, which can mean life or death for your patients. 

 Remain calm, and you will make better sense of things around you. 

  On developing mental calm:  

 
 The events that we see as negative all have a positive benefit that we can act on. A computer glitch that destroys your work in the hospital is now an opportunity to become two times better at your job because you’re going to do it twice. 
 Having a terrible supervisor in the wards is now an opportunity to learn from his/her faults while you fill up your resume and look for better opportunities elsewhere.  
Being mentally calm is seeing through the negative, past its underside and through to the positive. 
 



 Lifelong learner 

 A carpenter is only as good as the tools he is given. 

 Same thing applies to a nurse. However, in this case, the tools to a nurse are her knowledge and skillset. 

 A diverse skillset will make you valuable at a lot of situations. 

 A deep understanding of a certain skillset will make you highly valued at that field. 

 Whatever it is, learning new things and constantly studying to make yourself better is always a good idea. 

  On developing lifelong learning skills:  

 
 Develop a passion for the latest advancements in nursing policy, technology, and laws. The changes in those areas will ultimately affect the future of your work. 
 Have a career plan, and work towards getting the skills, certifications, or knowledge that you need to move on to the next stage of your career. 
 Follow great medical podcasts to listen to on your commute. 
 Subscribe to nursing-related journals and publications, and make it a point to read in your spare time. 
 



 Conclusion 

 It is said that in times that require greatness,  we do not rise to the occasion but we fall back on our training.  These habits may not be in you, but with deliberate and constant practice, you can cultivate these, and continue on your path of becoming not only a good nurse, but a great one. 

 Great nurses are always on the lookout for new, exciting, and better opportunities to grow their career. Find out your next employment with MIMS Career, a fast, secure, and convenient portal to connect you to top-class healthcare employers in MY, SG, ID, and PH.

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 Want to work in the United States? Opportunities are aplenty; the American over-65 population is about to triple by the year 2030.  Most of them will suffer from chronic conditions, be obese, and suffer from arthtritis.  This leads to an overwhelming demand for nurses to assist healthcare institutions in providing care to these aging patients. 

 Living in the United States can be an interesting and rewarding period of time. You get great education, infrastructure, and one of the highest standards of living in the world. The  salary  is great too: the median salary for US registered nurses is $60,616, or about RM250,000 per annum. 

 Here’s what you need to do: 



 1. Ensure your academic requirements are met 

 You need to: 

 
 Graduate from a program with accredited Registered Nursing 
 Have a valid RN license 
 Practiced as an RN for not less than two years  
-Some states (like  Texas  or California, for example), require you to complete a Foreign Educated Nurses (FEN) course. It’s a refresher course consisting of 240 hours divided equally into classroom and clinical practice. You will do it under the supervision of a licensed RN. 
 



 2. Pass English proficiency test 

 You need to do this if: 

 
 You graduated from a school not in the UK, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, or Ireland 
 Your school’s spoken language is anything other than English 
 Your school’s textbooks were written in English 
 

 You can take: 

 
 TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) 
 TOEIC (Test of English for International Communication) 
 IELTS (International English Language Testing System) 
 

 Send the test results directly to the state board you’re applying to. 



 3. Sit and pass your NCLEX-RN (National Council Licensing Examination - Registered Nurse) 

 To take the exam, you have to register with Pearson VUE. The instructions are all on the website. 



 4. Find an employer, or a recruiting agency based in the US 

 A recruiter can also be your employer. They will help you get your immigrant visa. Not only that, but they will also assist you in finding a job at a hospital or institution that they are partnered with. 



 5. Get an RN immigrant visa/green card 

 You are going to need these documents for your visa: 

 
 Visa Screen Certificate (VSC) 
 Evidence of US-based employer who will petition for your visa. As mentioned, a recruiter can also be your petitioner. 
 



 6. Obtain visa and accept job offer 

 You might have to take a medical exam for this. 



 7. Get certified for Resuscitation courses 

 You’ll need to take (depending on the area that you will practice in): 

 
 Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) course 
 Paediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) course[10] 
 

 And there you have it! All you have to do next is to emigrate to the US. We’d like to wish you good luck with your endeavours! 

 Great nurses are always on the lookout for new, exciting, and better opportunities to grow their career. Find out your next employment with MIMS Career, a fast, secure, and convenient portal to connect you to top-class healthcare employers in MY, SG, ID, and PH.

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 Why do we, as nursing professionals, have to put in effort to continuously learn? 

 The rate of progress in technology is growing at an exponential rate. The more things we discover, the faster we do it. What we learnt in nursing school 10 years ago might already be obsolete next year. As nurses, we are at risk of endangering our patients as our skills are steadily becoming more outdated. 

 Lifelong learning is a term that is freely being thrown around these past two decades. Lifelong learning means that education does not end at the academic level upon graduation; it means new skills, knowledge, and practices are always there to be learnt to improve oneself. 

 New Methods of Nursing 

 Take CPR, for example. 

 A vital procedure, many lives are saved with it. You would think that for something used so much in hospitals, it would be a science that’s very well established. 

 Unfortunately, no. Researchers and new observations change the way CPR is done. A decade ago, CPR was considered futile after a certain amount of time. Now, you are encouraged to  not give up  those chest compressions until medical help arrives. 

 Even the steps for CPR ten years ago are in different order. It used to be A-B-C; clear Airway, apply rescue breaths, then begin compressions.  Now compressions come first and foremost . The reason is because rescue breaths lower chest cavity air pressure, slowing circulation (which is exactly what we do not want in cardiac arrest). 

 The new methods are more effective than the older ones. And it took only ten years for the old methods to become obsolete. 

 Not knowing the newer, more effective method could cost someone his/her life. 

 Renewing Your Nursing License 

 In Malaysia, you have to renew your license every year. 

 When you renew your license, they will check your CPD points:  Continuous Professional Development  points. These are points that you gain when you go for any nursing related courses. 

 For example, attend a Midwifery course and gain 5 CPD points. Attend a Wound Management course and get 3. 

 These points accumulate throughout the year, and when you want to renew your license, you need about 20-30 points. Otherwise, you will not be able to renew, thus leaving you without any form of registration. Meaning you can’t practice nursing! 

 Improving care towards patients 

 Nurses with a higher level of education are able to think more critically of their patients. They are able to aid in diagnosis, notice patterns in communication, and other physical cues that would help in determining the best course of treatment. 

 A nurse with a post-basic in cardiology is much more useful to a cardiologist compared to a general staff nurse. They can work together, exchange information, and execute procedures that the latter would not normally have the ability to do. 

 21st Century patients 

 Nowadays, patients are have more access to information than ever before. They are more learned, and have different set of expectations. They query a lot; so nurses have to be armed with the right set of information to cater to these patients. It goes a long way in establishing their trust towards you. 

 A good nurse-patient relationship is very important to achieve successful recovery. 

 Great nurses are always on the lookout for new, exciting, and better opportunities to grow their career. Find out your next employment with MIMS Career, a fast, secure, and convenient portal to connect you to top-class healthcare employers in MY, SG, ID, and PH.

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