4 Reasons You Should Apply For A New Job NOW

Finding a new job can be very tiring, and time-consuming. It can be difficult to schedule some time to your job-seeking activities. However, the end of the year is a period of time you don’t want to miss if you want to maximize your chances of landing that precious new job. Here are four reasons why:

1. Employers are getting ready for the New Year

picture.com

Traditionally people wouldn’t advise you to hunt for a job at the end of the year, when employers have maxed their yearly budgets and are just closing the financial year with some wrap-up activities.

But growing evidence seems to suggest otherwise: as employers return from the holidays with a renewed vigor, new goals, and new KPIs, they are more inclined to act upon your application immediately.

2. Employers have plans for 2018

Planning

Whether its a big hospital, a small clinic, or a humble retirement home, everybody uses the last few weeks of the year to reflect back on their performance in order to stay afloat. It is normally during these periods of time that they make the decision to allocate budgets to hire new staff…

So get to applying!

3. You’re ready to apply for one

you're ready

The best time to apply for a job is also whenever you feel you’re ready.

When you want new experiences, new training, different exposure, or an increase in salary… you know it’s time to go.

So update your resume, acquire new skills, and hunt for that job.

4. You’re starting to feel miserable at your job


Find yourself feeling unnaturally tired? Even if you’ve been getting enough sleep?

If you’ve been exhibiting signs of stress due to your current job like fatigue, headaches, migraines and depression, it’s probably a sign that you should cut your losses and look for opportunities elsewhere.

Don’t think it’s your fault for not being able to fit in… sometimes the shoe just doesn’t fit.



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 Palliative care is a multidisciplinary approach to specialized medical care for people with life-limiting illnesses. It focuses on providing people with relief from the symptoms, pain, physical and mental stresses of the terminal diagnosis. The goal of such therapy is to improve quality of life for both the person and their family. 

 Palliative care is provided by a team of physicians, nurses, physiotherapists, occupational therapists and other health professionals who work together with the primary care doctors and referred specialists. It is appropriate at any age and at any stage in a serious illness and can be provided as the main goal of care of along with curative treatment. 

 Although it is an important part of end-of-life care, it is not limited to that stage. Palliative care can be provided across multiple settings including in hospitals, in the patient’s home, as part of the community palliative care programs, and in nursing facilities. Spiritual support is often provided in more interdisciplinary teams. 

 When a medicine or treatment relieves symptoms, but has no curative properties, it is said to be palliative. The word noncurative is sometimes paired with palliative for clarification purposes. 

 Scope 

 Palliative care is for patients with any serious illness and who have a physical or mental distress as a result of the treatment they are undergoing. Palliative care increases comfort by reducing pain, alleviating symptoms, and lessening stress for the patient and family. It is mutually beneficial for both patient and caregiver. 

 Emergency care nurses and doctors have a critical role to begin discussions with patients and their families regarding palliative care as they see them go through difficult times in life. 

 Paediatric palliative care is a rapidly growing subset of this field, and services directed specifically for children with serious illness are in dire need of this. 

 Responsibilities 


 
  Assessment of symptoms
 

 A method fr the assessment of symptoms in patients admitted to palliative care is the Edmonton Symptoms Assessment Scare, in which there are eight visual analog scales of 0 to 10, indicating the levels of pain, activity, nausea, depression, anxiety, drowsiness, appetite and sensation of well-being. On the scale, 0 means absent, and 10 means the worst imaginable possible. Medications are often managed at home by family or nursing support. 


   Further actions 

 Effective methods to ensuring successful palliative care is to provide a safe way for the individual to address their physical and psychological distress, that is to say their total suffering. 

 Dealing with total suffering involves addressing a wide range of concerns, starting with treating physical symptoms such as pain, nausea, and breathlessness. The palliative care teams have become very skillful in prescribing drugs for physical symptoms, and have been instrumental in showing how drugs such as morphine can be used safely while maintaining a patient’s full functions. 

 
  Importance of counselling
 

 Usually, a palliative care patient’s concerns are pain, fears of the future, uncertainties, and worries of their family and feeling like a burden. There are counselling, visual methods, cognitive therapy, and relaxation therapy to deal with it. 

 Pallliative care sees an increasingly wide range of conditions in patients at varying stage of their illness it follows that palliative care teams offer a range of care. This may range form managing the physical symptoms in patients receiving treatment for cancer, to treating depression in patients with advanced disease, to the care of patients in their last days and hours. 

 Training 

 In most countries hospice and palliative care is provided by an interdisciplinary team consisting of physicians, pharmacists, registered nurses, nursing assistant, social workers, and others. The focus on the team is to optimize the patient’s comfort. 

 Nurses in palliative care are given extensive training in counselling, medication dispensing, and support. The aim is about relieving distressing symptoms for the patient. Nurses are also part of the management of the imminently dying patient, more so than the physicians or doctors themselves. 

 Work Opportunities 

 The work opportunities that we get is aplenty. Palliative care is often used interchageably as a term with hospice care, albeit some slight differences. They share some similar goals of providing symptom relief and pain management. Palliative care services can be offered to any patient without restriction to disease or prognosis, and can be appropriate for anyone with a serious, complex illness, whether they are expected to recover fully or not. 

 Hospice is a type of care involving palliation without curative intent. usually it is used for people with no further options for curing their disease or in people who have decided to not pursue treatment that is hard on them. 

 Typically hospice and palliative care nurses work in non-hospital settings.

Career Highlight: Palliative Care

Palliative care is a multidisciplinary approach to specialized medical care for people with life-limiting illnesses. It focuses on providing people with relief from the symptoms, pain, physical and mental stresses of the terminal diagnosis. The...

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  source: Larm Rmah  

  1. Paediatrics  
 2. History  
 3. Key differences  
 4. Ethics  
 5. Training  
 6. Job scope  
 7. Required skills  
 8. Common Cases  
 9. Career Opportunities  

 Paediatrics 

 Paediatrics is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical of infants, children, and adolescents. The American Academy of Paediatrics recommends people be under paediatric care up to the age of 21. A medical practitioner who specializes in this area is known as a paediatrician. 

 The word paediatrics can be spelled as either  paediatrics , as per British English, or  pediatrics , as per the American counterpart. Both spellings are acceptable. 

 The word paediatrics comes from two Greek words: “ pais “, meaning children, and “ iaitros “, meaning “doctor” or “healer”. Paediatric nurses usually work in hospitals, assisting physicians in specialized subfields like  neonatology . 

 History 

 Paediatrics is considered to be a new subset of medicine today. Ancient Greek physicians like Hippocrates, Aristotle, Celsus, Soranus, and Galen understood the differences in growing organisms like children; as compared to fully-mature adults. Soranus, a Greek physician and gynaecologist from Ephesus (located in modern-day Turkey) has published  records dealing with neonatal paediatrics . 

   

  source: EIT Mental Health  

 Paediatrics as a specialized field of medicine continued to develop in the mid-19th century. The first generally accepted paediatric hospital is the L’Hopital des Enfants Malades, which literally translates from French as “The Hospital for Ill Children.” It opened in Paris in the month of June, 1802. It accepted patients up to the age of 15 years, and still continues to operate today. 

 Key Differences Between Adult and Paediatric Medicine 

 Maturation of the human body is paralleled by differences in body size. In other words, the smaller the infant, the more different the physiology of the said patient. The smaller body of an infant or a neonate (a baby) provides a greater concern to physicians or nurses in the paediatric ward. Congenital defects, genetic variance, and developmental issues adversely affect children more than adults. 

 Children, therefore, must not be treated as “a smaller version of adults.” 

 Nurses and physicians in the paediatric specialty must take into account the immature physiology of the infant or child when considering symptoms, prescribing medications, and diagnosing illnesses. 

 Ethics 

 Another major difference between adult and paediatric medicine, is that  children cannot make decisions for themselves . This is important enough to warrant its own subsection in this article. 

 The issues of guardianship, privacy, legal responsibility and informed consent must  always  be considered in every procedure. 

 
 … children cannot make decisions for themselves. 
 

 Rather than just treating the child, those working in paediatrics often have to treat the parents and the family. Adolescents are in their own legal class, depending on the country, and they have rights to their own health care decisions in certain circumstances. 

 Not only will a paediatric nurse or doctor take into account the desires of a child when considering treatment options, he or she will conform to the wishes of many people. This becomes especially  important when dealing with conditions of poor prognosis, and complicated or painful procedures.  

 Training 

 Courses are available to registered nurses who have completed a minimum number of service years. The number of years differ according to country. The qualifications range from advanced diplomas, to PhD research focusing on paediatric care. Many academicians forgo clinical practice in order to pursue research that will improve the quality of healthcare or bring about favourable policies to the care of children and adolescents. 

   

  source: paediatricemergencies.podbean.com  

 It is very common for paediatric nursing training to be comprised of  didactic  and clinical components covering the management and treatment of acute and complex child patients. 

 In Malaysia, paediatric training also comprises of management of sophisticated technology, providing nurses with the capability to offer quality care in a variety of situations. Training for disease prevention and recuperative treatment are also common modules in a paediatric nursing course. 

 Core modules of training would include  interpersonal skills and counselling ,  values and ethics ,  paediatric principles and practice ,  nursing of children with special needs ,  paediatric oncology , and some clinical practice. 

 Job scope and responsibilities 

 Typical activites may vary according to the role and work setting of the paediatric nurse. Children with special needs often require a different level of care compared to others. With that said, responsibilities include: 

 
	 assessment and critical reporting of patients 
	 preparing patients for pre- or post-op 
	 setting up drips, transfusions 
	 administering drugs and injections 
	 explaining procedures, treatments, to patients or guardians to acquire their consent to treatment 
	 support, comfort, and advise the child and family 
 

 Required skills 

 Children are sensitive, therefore tread lightly when giving care. Paediatric nurses need to display: 

 
	 respect towards the patients and their family’s decisions 
	 excellent communication skills 
	 be able to communicate on a level that the child would understand (if required) 
	 ability to deal with a range of patients at one time 
	 emotional resilience, and mentally strong to handle patients under difficult conditions 
	 compassion to others’ suffering 
 

 Common cases 

 Flat feet 

   

  source: smartlivingnetwork.com  

 Usually happens when the bar ossifies, about 8-12 years old. The tarsal area coalesces and causes rigid and painful flat feet. Operative treatment is not usually needed, unless severe. Usually managed non-operatively. 

 SUFE (Slipped Upper Femoral Epiphysis - also known as SCFE) 

   

  source: Raymond Liu, MD  

 This is a disease that afflicts adolescents (13-18 years old). The growth plate widens during growth spurt and some factors then predispose to slip. Adolescents who suffer from obesity, femoral neck retroversion, endocrinopathies, and trauma are particularly likely to be diagnosed with this. 

 Bradycardia 

   

  source: cardiachealth.org  

 Bradycardia is defined by a heart rate less than the lower limit of normal for age. For infants below 3 years, it is 100 bpm. For children 3-9 years, it is 60 bpm. For 9-16 years, it is 50 bpm. Bradycardial abnormalities can be diagnosed using the 12-lead ECG or the 24-hour holter monitor. 

 Exercise stress testing is not needed in the diagnosis, but may be helpful to determine chronotropic competence. 

 Non-neonatal jaundice 

   

  source: patient.info  

 Jaundice is a yellowish discolouration of the skin, sclera, and mucous membranes due to high counts of bilirubin. It occurs as a result of abnormal bilirubin metabolism and/or secretion. Typically occuring in neonates, jaundice can occur in all age groups. 

 Treatment is done after classifying the jaundice as conjugated or unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia in the older child. Jaundice in older children may be the first clinical manifestation of unrecognized chronic liver disease. 

 Career opportunities 

 Paediatrics is one of those specialties that becomes deeper with more things to explore the more experience you have. Subspecialties in hospitals and community areas include: 

 
	  neonatal intensive care  
	 paediatric oncology 
	 child protection 
	 ambulatory care 
	 asthma 
	 diabetes 
	 counselling 
	 special needs 
 

 A more senior paediatric nurse is likely to have less and less clinical duties as a ward manager or ward sister. A future as a clinical unit manager is entirely within reach. 

 Outside clinical settings, opportunities to work in private healthcare, social services, NGOs, charities, or volunteer organizations are aplenty. 

 Search for high-paying nursing jobs on  MIMS Career . Browse, save, and apply for nursing jobs, all in one-click. Take the opportunity for higher pay and better work locations. Our pages are all mobile-responsive, allowing you to take that leap for a better job whenever, wherever you are. All our job postings are heavily screened to  prevent scams and mistrustful behavior.  
   

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Career Highlight: Paediatric Nursing

source: Larm Rmah 1. Paediatrics 2. History 3. Key differences 4. Ethics 5. Training 6. Job scope 7. Required skills 8. Common Cases 9. Career Opportunities Paediatrics Paediatrics is the...

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 As incidences of chronic kidney disease and other related renal issues continue to rise, the need for adequately trained nurses in those fields continue to grow. Similar conditions are seen in various parts of the world. In 1999, the incidence of patients with kidney conditions requiring long-term care is 340,261. In 2010 it is over 600,000. 

 The diagnosis of renal conditions can be done with a primary care doctor. However, treatment and care of those patients require an understanding of risks, comorbid conditions, complications, and probabilities for loss of kidneys by both physicians and nurses. 

 For nurses, a post-basic renal course can open the doors to working in this area which is sorely lacking in manpower. Here are the reasons why you should consider pursuing a renal post-basic certification. 

 From bedside to business 

 There are a lot of CKD (chronic kidney disease) clinics opening up. Having a renal certification enables you to work at these clinics as your training is aligned with what they have to offer their patients. 

  Pusat Hemodialisis Mawar  is one of them. They are the largest private charity haemodialysis organization in the country. They have 13 centres spread throughout the country. 

 A short search on Google Maps also reveals a lot of haemodialysis centres in Klang Valley. 

 Being a nurse at institutions like those will train your patient management skills as you run the day-to-day administrative tasks in parallel with your nursing duties. 

 Better work setting 

 You’ll have a less erratic schedule than your peers. Dialysis patients require a regular timing on their treatment. Your shifts would be on more regular hours. A more fixed routine can be better for your health and well-being. 

 Better pay 

  On average, renal nurses with post basic certification get about 10% more pay.  

 Hospital dialysis nurses may be offered more pay, but they may also be required for emergency dialysis treatments, making their schedule less average than others in their field of focus. 

 Adjustable pace 

 You can choose to work in smaller dialysis centres for slower pace, or larger nephrology units in hospitals if you wish for a faster paced working environment. Unlike other specialties, you have a choice to work in the kind of environment that suits your working style. 

 Rapid changes in the field 

 Technological advances in the renal treatment field progresses at a rapid pace. Previously, it was slow. Kidney diseases were complex and difficult to study. Therefore treatments were vaguely ineffective. 

 The 21st century brought in upgraded transplantation technologies with breakthroughs in biocompatible materials. 

 As a renal nurse, you will handle the care of post-transplant patients. The tasks and how you perform your duties to these patients have a high probability of changing with the frenetic pace of research. 

 High Demand 

 Renal nurses have good experience in interpreting telemetric data. This makes them efficient at being support units in surgical wards to ensure successful procedures. 

 Dialysis is expensive, costly, and there’re not enough facilities and manpower in public and private hospitals. 

 Conclusion 

 Pursuing a renal post-basic certification is a solid pathway to consider. Nurses with this certification are more in demand, have better pay, and all the listed advantages above. For people who like clinical challenges, treading this path is for you. 

 Already have a post-basic in renal care? Head over to MIMS Career to search and apply for renal care jobs in your area. Just signup and experience our convenient 1-click application process. It’s fast, safe, and easy. MIMS Career also allows you to search in our huge database of employers seeking new staff. You can also save potential jobs for later viewing, and create your own personalized job alert.

Renal Post-Basic, a certification to consider

As incidences of chronic kidney disease and other related renal issues continue to rise, the need for adequately trained nurses in those fields continue to grow. Similar conditions are seen in various parts of the world. In 1999, the incidence...

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 For those nurses serving with  Kementrian Kesihatan Malaysia  (KKM), the start of your work life will present you with one of the toughest choices you’ll make: 

 
 EPF (Employees’ Provident Fund, also known as KWSP), or choose the pension fund? 
 

 Both are viable options in securing your financial health after you retire. Although retirement might seem like ages away, a good amount of planning and successful investments can mean the difference between being able to live comfortably in your golden years, or struggle with daily or medical expenses. 

 So which to choose? We’ll break down the points below. 

 Pension fund 

  What is it?  
It’s a monthly stipend of a set amount, provided by the Public Services Department upon your retirement. In addition to that, you also receive a  gratuity  payment, and medical/health benefits. 

  Calculation  
Here we will be assuming that you start work at 20 years old, with a starting salary of RM2,000, and continue working until you retire at 55 with a salary of RM5,600 (3% annual pay increase). 

 Your monthly pension will be your last drawn salary, divided by two. For example, if your base salary is RM5,000 when you retire, your monthly stipend will be RM2,800/mo. 

 In addition to that, you will receive gratuity payment, which is calculated as such: 

 
 gratuity = 7.5% x 35yrs x 12 months x RM5,600 (final drawn salary) 
= RM 176,400. 
 

 RM176,400 will be given as a lump sum, while RM2,800 will be given per month. Again, this is all assuming you retire at 55, with a final salary of RM5,600. 

  Benefits  

 
	 No subtraction from base pay. 
 

 Unlike EPF, as we will see later, there is no subtraction from your base salary. 

 
	 Guaranteed monthly retirement funding 
 

 Again, unlike EPF, where your money can be withdrawn for other uses, pension takers are guaranteed to have a monthly source of income. 

  Disadvantages  

 
	 You have to start and end your service in the public/government sector. It might hamper your ability to seek work overseas, better base salaries, or even some chances to study. 
 

 EPF or Employees Provident Fund (KWSP - Kumpulan Simpanan Wang Pekerja) 

  What is it?  
EPF is the accumulation of savings generated from deductions of your base salary. Currently, you can choose either 11%, or 8%, as  recently announced . 

 This accumulation of money is further grown by annual dividends. On average the dividend is around 6%, depending on the GDP (gross domestic product) of the country. 

 What makes EPF great as long term savings is due to the magic of  compound interest. . Your employer also contributes to your fund (12% of your pay). These two things make an EPF account grow substantially when properly managed. 

  2 accounts  

 Your EPF savings are divided into two accounts. 70% goes into account 1, and the rest to account 2. Account 1 is your retirement funds. Account 2 is withdrawable, under a few conditions: 

 
	 more than 50 years old 
	 Housing downpayment for your 1st house 
	 housing loan payment 
	 education 
	 medical costs 
	 Hajj pilgrimage 
 

 Upon reaching the age of 55, you will be able to withdraw from account 1. You will have to choose to withdraw one lump sum, or as a monthly stipend like a pension. 

  Calculation  

 Let’s take the same example as just now. Start work at 20, salary RM2,000, retire at 55, salary RM5,000. 

 
 Deduction from pay = 11% = RM220 
Employer contribution = 12% = RM240 
 We will assume no withdrawals are made over entire working period  
EPF annual dividend = 6% 
 

 The interest adds up year over year, and with the help of EPF’s  online calculator , 

 Total EPF savings at 55 years old = RM461,900 

 It is a marginally higher amount than RM176,400 gratuity you will receive from a pension. 

  Benefits  

 
	 Flexibility. At the age of 55, you can withdraw that money and invest in another scheme, venture, or fund that offers greater returns. 
	 Faster growth. As shown, even with a contribution of 11% of your pay, over the course of 35 years it balloons into a large amount of money. 
	 Freedom of employment. You no longer have to work within the constraints of the government or public service. You are free to pursue study or work opportunities as you wish. 
 

  Disadvantages  

 
	 Sometimes things don’t go as planned. You might hit a financial roadblock that forces you to withdraw from your EPF fund. An example of this is a medical emergency. 
	 It subtracts 11% of your base salary. 11% might not seem like much, but for people who live paycheck to paycheck, it can be a bitter pill to swallow. 
	 Annual dividend from EPF can decrease, depending on economic climate. 
 

 Making a comparison 

 Monthly funds 

 Assuming that you live until the mean life expectancy age in Malaysia, which is 76 years old. 

 
 Years to live off retirement fund (pension) = 76-55 = 21 years 
 

 To make a fair comparison, let’s subtract the gratuity amount of a pension scheme from the lump sum of EPF savings. 

 
 EPF at 55 years old - gratuity of pension at 55 years old = RM461,900 - RM176,400 = RM285,500 

 Stipend per month that EPF provides = RM285,500 / 21 years / 12 months = RM1,132.94/month 
 

 Even if we did not subtract the gratuity value, it would be: 

 
 RM461,900 / 21 years / 12 months = RM1,832.94/ month 
 

  It is far less than RM2,600/month from a pension scheme . 

 What if we invest all of EPF savings? 

 Say at the age of 55, you embark on another investment with better returns. We will assume 8%. You pile up all your savings into it. 

 Investment return x EPF savings = 8% x RM 461,900 = RM36,952/year or RM3,079.33/month. 

  It is more than what you’ll obtain from a pension.  However you’ll need to ensure that the second investment has better returns than EPF dividends. That in itself can sometimes be a challenge. 

 Conclusion 

 They both have their advantages and drawbacks. It seems like it is up to you to play it well, to ensure you can lead a comfortable life upon retirement. 

 However the main question of choosing either EPF or pension as retirement savings often boils down to your choice of employer. 

 Will you stay with the government sector for another 30+ years? You don’t want to end up with no retirement fund… No EPF or no pension. That’d be the worst. 

 If yes, go for the pension scheme. It is safe, guaranteed, and offers great peace of mind in your golden years. 

 However, with EPF, you are free to take up opportunities that come your way. Countries like Saudi Arabia, Singapore, and Australia are actively seeking out Malaysian nurses with extremely attractive pay. Opportunities for post-graduate education are more limited in the government sector; if in private, you get to choose when you want to do it. You can also fund it with your EPF savings, something you can’t do on a pension. 

 Choose the freedom of choice. Search for high-paying nursing jobs, and overseas jobs on MIMS Career. Browse, save, and apply for nursing jobs, all in one-click. Take the opportunity for higher pay and better work locations. Our pages are all mobile-responsive, allowing you to take that leap for a better job whenever, wherever you are. All our job postings are heavily screened to prevent scams and mistrustful behavior. 
   

 
 Our Most Popular Articles 

  Think About These 5 Things Before You Decide On A Specialization  

  5 Things Nurses Need To Know To Be Paid More  

  10 Ways Malaysian Nurses Can Increase Their Income

EPF (KWSP), or Pension? Which to choose?

For those nurses serving with Kementrian Kesihatan Malaysia (KKM), the start of your work life will present you with one of the toughest choices you’ll make: EPF (Employees’ Provident Fund, also known as KWSP), or choose...

Read More